Vincent M Janik

Summary

Affiliation: University of St Andrews
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Communication in bottlenose dolphins: 50 years of signature whistle research
    Vincent M Janik
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, KY16 8LB, UK
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 199:479-89. 2013
  2. doi request reprint Cognitive skills in bottlenose dolphin communication
    Vincent M Janik
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, UK
    Trends Cogn Sci 17:157-9. 2013
  3. pmc Signature whistle shape conveys identity information to bottlenose dolphins
    V M Janik
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:8293-7. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Call usage learning in gray seals (Halichoerus grypus)
    Ari D Shapiro
    School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom
    J Comp Psychol 118:447-54. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint The animal cultures debate
    Kevin N Laland
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Queen s Terrace, St Andrews, Fife, UK
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:542-7. 2006
  6. pmc Bottlenose dolphins exchange signature whistles when meeting at sea
    Nicola J Quick
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2539-45. 2012
  7. ncbi request reprint Understanding culture across species
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9JU, UK
    Trends Cogn Sci 8:341-6. 2004
  8. pmc Vocal copying of individually distinctive signature whistles in bottlenose dolphins
    Stephanie L King
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20130053. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Aversiveness of sounds in phocid seals: psycho-physiological factors, learning processes and motivation
    Thomas Gotz
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, KY16 8LB, UK
    J Exp Biol 213:1536-48. 2010
  10. pmc Repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to sensitisation in subsequent avoidance behaviour and induces fear conditioning
    Thomas Gotz
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, UK
    BMC Neurosci 12:30. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. doi request reprint Communication in bottlenose dolphins: 50 years of signature whistle research
    Vincent M Janik
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, KY16 8LB, UK
    J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 199:479-89. 2013
    ..We show how these signals stand out amongst recognition calls in animals and how they contribute to our understanding of complexity in animal communication...
  2. doi request reprint Cognitive skills in bottlenose dolphin communication
    Vincent M Janik
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, UK
    Trends Cogn Sci 17:157-9. 2013
    ....
  3. pmc Signature whistle shape conveys identity information to bottlenose dolphins
    V M Janik
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:8293-7. 2006
    ..Thus, dolphins are the only animals other than humans that have been shown to transmit identity information independent of the caller's voice or location...
  4. ncbi request reprint Call usage learning in gray seals (Halichoerus grypus)
    Ari D Shapiro
    School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom
    J Comp Psychol 118:447-54. 2004
    ..However, novel moan and growl stimuli tended to elicit growls. This casts doubt on the possibility that gray seals can reach the 4th level, but it demonstrates that they are capable of the first 3 levels of usage learning...
  5. ncbi request reprint The animal cultures debate
    Kevin N Laland
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Queen s Terrace, St Andrews, Fife, UK
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:542-7. 2006
    ..Here we suggest that, rather than attributing behaviour to explanatory categories, researchers would often be better advised to partition variance in behaviour to alternative sources...
  6. pmc Bottlenose dolphins exchange signature whistles when meeting at sea
    Nicola J Quick
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2539-45. 2012
    ..The data show that signature whistle exchanges are a significant part of a greeting sequence that allows dolphins to identify conspecifics when encountering them in the wild...
  7. ncbi request reprint Understanding culture across species
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9JU, UK
    Trends Cogn Sci 8:341-6. 2004
    ..Exploring six views of culture, this article highlights the fundamental contrast of whether culture evolves as a by-product of cumulative change in cognitive mechanisms, or whether it is actively selected for its advantages...
  8. pmc Vocal copying of individually distinctive signature whistles in bottlenose dolphins
    Stephanie L King
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 280:20130053. 2013
    ..This use of vocal copying is similar to its use in human language, where the maintenance of social bonds appears to be more important than the immediate defence of resources...
  9. doi request reprint Aversiveness of sounds in phocid seals: psycho-physiological factors, learning processes and motivation
    Thomas Gotz
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, KY16 8LB, UK
    J Exp Biol 213:1536-48. 2010
    ..Our results highlight the importance of considering the effects of acoustic parameters other than the received level as well as animal motivation and previous experience when assessing the impacts of anthropogenic noise on animals...
  10. pmc Repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to sensitisation in subsequent avoidance behaviour and induces fear conditioning
    Thomas Gotz
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, UK
    BMC Neurosci 12:30. 2011
    ..In this study we investigate the follow-up behaviour associated with the startle reflex in wild-captured animals using an experimental setup that allows individuals to exhibit avoidance behaviour...
  11. doi request reprint Whistle vocalizations of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) inhabiting the south-west Indian Ocean
    Tess Gridley
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 8LB, United Kingdom
    J Acoust Soc Am 132:4032-40. 2012
    ..Comparisons within the genus showed that T. aduncus from the SWIO have amongst the lowest start and minimum frequency of whistles within Tursiops...
  12. doi request reprint Whistle rates of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus): influences of group size and behavior
    Nicola J Quick
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
    J Comp Psychol 122:305-11. 2008
    ..Our results show that although bottlenose dolphins whistle more in social situations they also decrease vocal output in large groups where the potential for signal masking by other dolphin whistles increases...
  13. ncbi request reprint A gray seal's (Halichoerus grypus) responses to experimenter-given pointing and directional cues
    Ari D Shapiro
    School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom
    J Comp Psychol 117:355-62. 2003
    ..Like many animals in similar studies, this gray seal probably did not understand the referential character of these gestures but rather used signal generalization and experience from initial operant conditioning to solve these tasks...
  14. pmc Bottlenose dolphins can use learned vocal labels to address each other
    Stephanie L King
    Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:13216-21. 2013
    ..Bottlenose dolphins therefore appear to be unique as nonhuman mammals to use learned signals as individually specific labels for different social companions in their own natural communication system. ..