W O H Hughes

Summary

Affiliation: University of Leeds
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Ancestral monogamy shows kin selection is key to the evolution of eusociality
    William O H Hughes
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
    Science 320:1213-6. 2008
  2. pmc Genetic polymorphism in leaf-cutting ants is phenotypically plastic
    William O H Hughes
    Department of Population Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1625-30. 2007
  3. pmc Caste-specific expression of genetic variation in the size of antibiotic-producing glands of leaf-cutting ants
    W O H Hughes
    Department of Biology, Centre for Social Evolution, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark
    Proc Biol Sci 277:609-15. 2010
  4. doi request reprint Multiple paternity or multiple queens: two routes to greater intracolonial genetic diversity in the eusocial Hymenoptera
    W O H Hughes
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Evol Biol 21:1090-5. 2008
  5. pmc Genetic royal cheats in leaf-cutting ant societies
    William O H Hughes
    Centre for Social Evolution, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:5150-3. 2008
  6. doi request reprint Antimicrobial defense shows an abrupt evolutionary transition in the fungus-growing ants
    William O H Hughes
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Evolution 62:1252-7. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Size and asymmetry: are there costs to winning the royalty race?
    R E Mitchell
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Evol Biol 25:522-31. 2012
  8. ncbi request reprint Does genetic diversity hinder parasite evolution in social insect colonies?
    W O H Hughes
    Department of Population Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    J Evol Biol 19:132-43. 2006
  9. pmc Let your enemy do the work: within-host interactions between two fungal parasites of leaf-cutting ants
    W O H Hughes
    Zoological Institute, Department of Population Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S104-6. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Diversity of entomopathogenic fungi near leaf-cutting ant nests in a neotropical forest, with particular reference to Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae
    W O H Hughes
    Department of Population Ecology, Zoological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark
    J Invertebr Pathol 85:46-53. 2004

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. doi request reprint Ancestral monogamy shows kin selection is key to the evolution of eusociality
    William O H Hughes
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
    Science 320:1213-6. 2008
    ..These results provide the first evidence that monogamy was critical in the evolution of eusociality, strongly supporting the prediction of inclusive fitness theory...
  2. pmc Genetic polymorphism in leaf-cutting ants is phenotypically plastic
    William O H Hughes
    Department of Population Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1625-30. 2007
    ....
  3. pmc Caste-specific expression of genetic variation in the size of antibiotic-producing glands of leaf-cutting ants
    W O H Hughes
    Department of Biology, Centre for Social Evolution, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark
    Proc Biol Sci 277:609-15. 2010
    ..This is consistent with the hypothesis that there is individual selection on disease defence in founding queens and colony-level selection on disease defence in the worker castes...
  4. doi request reprint Multiple paternity or multiple queens: two routes to greater intracolonial genetic diversity in the eusocial Hymenoptera
    W O H Hughes
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Evol Biol 21:1090-5. 2008
    ..These results strongly suggest that fitness benefits resulting from increased intracolonial genetic diversity have played an important role in the evolution of polyandry, and possibly polygyny, in social insects...
  5. pmc Genetic royal cheats in leaf-cutting ant societies
    William O H Hughes
    Centre for Social Evolution, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:5150-3. 2008
    ..The results demonstrate that cheating can be widespread in even the most cooperative of societies and illustrate that identical principles govern social evolution in highly diverse systems...
  6. doi request reprint Antimicrobial defense shows an abrupt evolutionary transition in the fungus-growing ants
    William O H Hughes
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Evolution 62:1252-7. 2008
    ....
  7. doi request reprint Size and asymmetry: are there costs to winning the royalty race?
    R E Mitchell
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Evol Biol 25:522-31. 2012
    ..Our results suggest that queen-biased patrilines do not incur a fitness cost in terms of body size, but may face more subtle costs in developmental stability. Such costs may constrain the evolution of royal cheating in social insects...
  8. ncbi request reprint Does genetic diversity hinder parasite evolution in social insect colonies?
    W O H Hughes
    Department of Population Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    J Evol Biol 19:132-43. 2006
    ..These results indicate that host genetic diversity may indeed hinder the ability of parasites to adapt while cycling within social insect colonies...
  9. pmc Let your enemy do the work: within-host interactions between two fungal parasites of leaf-cutting ants
    W O H Hughes
    Zoological Institute, Department of Population Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S104-6. 2004
    ..This result is strikingly similar to that seen in immunocompromised vertebrate hosts and indicates that avirulent parasites may play a more important role in host life histories than is generally realized...
  10. ncbi request reprint Diversity of entomopathogenic fungi near leaf-cutting ant nests in a neotropical forest, with particular reference to Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae
    W O H Hughes
    Department of Population Ecology, Zoological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark
    J Invertebr Pathol 85:46-53. 2004
    ..While leaf-cutting ants at this site must, therefore, regularly come into contact with a diversity of entomopathogenic fungi, they do not appear to be normally infected by them...
  11. doi request reprint Multiple gains and losses of Wolbachia symbionts across a tribe of fungus-growing ants
    C L Frost
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Mol Ecol 19:4077-85. 2010
    ..We suggest that infection loss and horizontal transmission have driven epidemics or selective sweeps of Wolbachia, resulting in multiple gains and losses of infection across the fungus-growing ants...
  12. ncbi request reprint Genetic diversity and disease resistance in leaf-cutting ant societies
    William O H Hughes
    Zoological Institute, Department of Population Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
    Evolution 58:1251-60. 2004
    ..That this genetic variation can improve the resistance of groups even under the limited conditions tested suggests that polyandry may indeed produce colonies with improved resistance to disease...
  13. ncbi request reprint Ant parasite queens revert to mating singly
    Seirian Sumner
    Biological Institute, Department of Population Biology, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
    Nature 428:35-6. 2004
    ..This rapid and surprising reversion to single mating in a socially parasitic ant indicates that the costs of polyandry are probably specific to a free-living lifestyle...
  14. pmc Worker caste polymorphism has a genetic basis in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants
    William O H Hughes
    Department of Population Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, Copenhagen 2100, Denmark
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:9394-7. 2003
    ..The results suggest that a significant role of genetics may have been overlooked in our understanding of other complex polymorphisms of social insects...
  15. pmc Trade-offs in group living: transmission and disease resistance in leaf-cutting ants
    William O H Hughes
    Department of Population Ecology, Zoological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
    Proc Biol Sci 269:1811-9. 2002
    ..Unlike most organisms, group living in these ants may actually be associated with a net benefit in terms of disease dynamics...
  16. pmc Adaptive social immunity in leaf-cutting ants
    Tom N Walker
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Biol Lett 5:446-8. 2009
    ..The results thus indicate that the social immune response of this leaf-cutting ant is adaptive, with the group exhibiting a greater and more effective response to a parasite that it has previously been exposed to...
  17. pmc Density-dependence and within-host competition in a semelparous parasite of leaf-cutting ants
    William O H Hughes
    Department of Population Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
    BMC Evol Biol 4:45. 2004
    ..anisopliae, and its leaf-cutting ant host Acromyrmex echinatior as the model system...
  18. ncbi request reprint Field evaluation of potential of alarm pheromone compounds to enhance baits for control of grass-cutting ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
    William O H Hughes
    Biodiversity and Ecology Division, School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, United Kingdom
    J Econ Entomol 95:537-43. 2002
    ..The possible reasons for the lack of an enhancement of harvest and the potential for using alarm pheromone compounds as leaf-cutting ant bait enhancers are discussed...