Peter J Hudson

Summary

Affiliation: University of Stirling
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Prevention of population cycles by parasite removal
    P J Hudson
    Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK NJ 08544 1003, USA
    Science 282:2256-8. 1998
  2. ncbi request reprint Tick-borne encephalitis virus in northern Italy: molecular analysis, relationships with density and seasonal dynamics of Ixodes ricinus
    P J Hudson
    Department of Biological and Molecular Science, University of Stirling, Scotland
    Med Vet Entomol 15:304-13. 2001
  3. pmc Trophic interactions and population growth rates: describing patterns and identifying mechanisms
    Peter J Hudson
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:1259-71. 2002
  4. pmc Ticks need not bite their red grouse hosts to infect them with louping ill virus
    Lucy Gilbert
    Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S202-5. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint The role of non-viraemic transmission on the persistence and dynamics of a tick borne virus--Louping ill in red grouse ( Lagopus lagopus scoticus) and mountain hares ( Lepus timidus)
    Rachel Norman
    Stirling Mathematical Ecology Group, Department of Computing Science and Mathematics, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
    J Math Biol 48:119-34. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Empirical evidence for key hosts in persistence of a tick-borne disease
    Sarah E Perkins
    Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
    Int J Parasitol 33:909-17. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Testing the role of parasites in driving the cyclic population dynamics of a gamebird
    Stephen M Redpath
    Ecol Lett 9:410-8. 2006
  8. pmc Sacred cows and sympathetic squirrels: the importance of biological diversity to human health
    Andy Dobson
    Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
    PLoS Med 3:e231. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Localized deer absence leads to tick amplification
    Sarah E Perkins
    Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, 208 Mueller Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
    Ecology 87:1981-6. 2006
  10. pmc Seasonality, cohort-dependence and the development of immunity in a natural host-nematode system
    Stephen J Cornell
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:511-8. 2008

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. ncbi request reprint Prevention of population cycles by parasite removal
    P J Hudson
    Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK NJ 08544 1003, USA
    Science 282:2256-8. 1998
    ..Treatment of the grouse population prevented population crashes, demonstrating that parasites were the cause of the cyclic fluctuations...
  2. ncbi request reprint Tick-borne encephalitis virus in northern Italy: molecular analysis, relationships with density and seasonal dynamics of Ixodes ricinus
    P J Hudson
    Department of Biological and Molecular Science, University of Stirling, Scotland
    Med Vet Entomol 15:304-13. 2001
    ..ricinus was observed. This study provides evidence to suggest that roe deer may have an important role to play in the maintenance of tick density and in the persistence of TBE virus...
  3. pmc Trophic interactions and population growth rates: describing patterns and identifying mechanisms
    Peter J Hudson
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:1259-71. 2002
    ..Models can be tested further to explore how the community of predators and others interact with their prey...
  4. pmc Ticks need not bite their red grouse hosts to infect them with louping ill virus
    Lucy Gilbert
    Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S202-5. 2004
    ..This has potential implications for the understanding of other biting vector-borne pathogens where hosts may ingest vectors through foraging or grooming...
  5. ncbi request reprint The role of non-viraemic transmission on the persistence and dynamics of a tick borne virus--Louping ill in red grouse ( Lagopus lagopus scoticus) and mountain hares ( Lepus timidus)
    Rachel Norman
    Stirling Mathematical Ecology Group, Department of Computing Science and Mathematics, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
    J Math Biol 48:119-34. 2004
    ..More importantly, if the level of non-viraemic transmission is high enough the virus can persist in the absence of the viraemic host. This result has important implications for the control of tick borne diseases...
  6. ncbi request reprint Empirical evidence for key hosts in persistence of a tick-borne disease
    Sarah E Perkins
    Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
    Int J Parasitol 33:909-17. 2003
    ..However, individuals can change their functional status over time making it difficult to predict the contribution of these individuals to future transmission...
  7. ncbi request reprint Testing the role of parasites in driving the cyclic population dynamics of a gamebird
    Stephen M Redpath
    Ecol Lett 9:410-8. 2006
    ..Another process was operating to drive the populations down. Together with our other results these findings emphasize that both trophic and intrinsic processes may act within populations to cause unstable dynamics...
  8. pmc Sacred cows and sympathetic squirrels: the importance of biological diversity to human health
    Andy Dobson
    Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
    PLoS Med 3:e231. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Localized deer absence leads to tick amplification
    Sarah E Perkins
    Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, 208 Mueller Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
    Ecology 87:1981-6. 2006
    ..We propose that localized absence of deer (loss of a dilution host) increases tick feeding on rodents, leading to the potential for tick-borne disease hotspots...
  10. pmc Seasonality, cohort-dependence and the development of immunity in a natural host-nematode system
    Stephen J Cornell
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:511-8. 2008
    ..These observations have important and broad implications for the ecology of parasite infection in seasonal natural herbivore systems...
  11. pmc Interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms in a cyclic species: testosterone increases parasite infection in red grouse
    Linzi J Seivwright
    Hill of Brathens, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Banchory, Aberdeenshire AB31 4BW, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2299-304. 2005
    ..We discuss possible physiological and behavioural mechanisms linking testosterone and increased parasite intensity, and the implications for our understanding of complex, unstable population dynamics...
  12. ncbi request reprint Prevalence, intensity and aggregation of intestinal parasites in mountain hares and their potential impact on population dynamics
    Scott Newey
    Game Conservancy Trust, Drumochter Lodge, Dalwhinnie, Inverness shire PH19 1AF, UK
    Int J Parasitol 35:367-73. 2005
    ..retortaeformis and the significant negative effect of intensity of infection on body condition are in accordance with the hypothesis that the host-parasite interaction is the causative destabilising mechanism for mountain hare dynamics...
  13. ncbi request reprint Competition and mutualism among the gut helminths of a mammalian host
    Joanne Lello
    CSIRO Livestock Industries, F D McMaster Laboratories, Locked Bag 1, PO Armidale, New South Wales 2350, Australia
    Nature 428:840-4. 2004
    ..In contrast, a clear understanding of such interactions may provide the basis for the development of more environmentally acceptable methods of parasite control...
  14. ncbi request reprint Ecology. Vole stranglers and lemming cycles
    Peter J Hudson
    Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    Science 302:797-8. 2003
  15. ncbi request reprint Separating behavioral and physiological mechanisms in testosterone-mediated trade-offs
    Francois Mougeot
    Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Hill of Brathens, Banchory AB31 4BW, Scotland, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 166:158-68. 2005
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Pathogen interactions, population cycles, and phase shifts
    Joanne Lello
    School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3TL, Wales, UK
    Am Nat 171:176-82. 2008
    ..Finally, because the model structure used here is analogous to models of a simple predator-prey system, we also consider the consequences of these findings in the context of that system...
  17. pmc Analysing noisy time-series: describing regional variation in the cyclic dynamics of red grouse
    Daniel T Haydon
    Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH25 9RG, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:1609-17. 2002
    ..Average periodicity increases significantly from 6.8 to 8.9 years from the most southerly to most northerly populations. However, latitude explains only 5.3% of the variation in periodicity of the cycles...
  18. ncbi request reprint Field evidence for leech-borne transmission of amphibian Ichthyophonus sp
    Thomas R Raffel
    Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Department of Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
    J Parasitol 92:1256-64. 2006
    ..infection in amphibians...
  19. ncbi request reprint Thresholds for disease persistence in models for tick-borne infections including non-viraemic transmission, extended feeding and tick aggregation
    Roberto Rosa
    Centre for Alpine Ecology, Viote del Monte Bondone, 38040 Trento, Italy
    J Theor Biol 224:359-76. 2003
    ..Finally, we incorporated the effects of tick aggregation on the hosts and correlation of tick stages and found that both had an important effect on infection persistence, if non-viraemic transmission occurred...
  20. ncbi request reprint Is a healthy ecosystem one that is rich in parasites?
    Peter J Hudson
    Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:381-5. 2006
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Parasites and climate synchronize red grouse populations
    Isabella M Cattadori
    Center for Infectious Diseases Dynamics, Mueller Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
    Nature 433:737-41. 2005
    ..This in turn forces grouse populations into synchrony. We conclude that specific climatic events may lead to outbreaks of infectious diseases or pests that may cause dramatic, synchronized changes in the abundance of their hosts...
  22. ncbi request reprint Parasites prevent summer breeding in white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus
    Kurt J Vandegrift
    Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Biology Department, Mueller Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
    Ecology 89:2251-8. 2008
    ..These results provide evidence that gastrointestinal helminths reduce P. leucopus reproductive output in central Pennsylvania, and these effects on reproduction could play a role in the unstable dynamics of small mammals...