Rosalind E Howes

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oxford
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Spatial distribution of G6PD deficiency variants across malaria-endemic regions
    Rosalind E Howes
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Malar J 12:418. 2013
  2. pmc G6PD deficiency prevalence and estimates of affected populations in malaria endemic countries: a geostatistical model-based map
    Rosalind E Howes
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS Med 9:e1001339. 2012
  3. doi request reprint G6PD deficiency: global distribution, genetic variants and primaquine therapy
    Rosalind E Howes
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Adv Parasitol 81:133-201. 2013
  4. pmc Global epidemiology of sickle haemoglobin in neonates: a contemporary geostatistical model-based map and population estimates
    Frédéric B Piel
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Lancet 381:142-51. 2013
  5. pmc The global public health significance of Plasmodium vivax
    Katherine E Battle
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Adv Parasitol 80:1-111. 2012
  6. pmc The distribution of haemoglobin C and its prevalence in newborns in Africa
    Frédéric B Piel
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, United Kingdom
    Sci Rep 3:1671. 2013
  7. pmc Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders
    Frédéric B Piel
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Hum Mutat 34:937-44. 2013
  8. pmc A long neglected world malaria map: Plasmodium vivax endemicity in 2010
    Peter W Gething
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 6:e1814. 2012
  9. ncbi request reprint Geographical variation in Plasmodium vivax relapse
    Katherine E Battle
    Department of Zoology, Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Malar J 13:144. 2014
  10. pmc Global distribution of the sickle cell gene and geographical confirmation of the malaria hypothesis
    Frédéric B Piel
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Commun 1:104. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. pmc Spatial distribution of G6PD deficiency variants across malaria-endemic regions
    Rosalind E Howes
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Malar J 12:418. 2013
    ..The risk of such an outcome varies widely among G6PD gene variants...
  2. pmc G6PD deficiency prevalence and estimates of affected populations in malaria endemic countries: a geostatistical model-based map
    Rosalind E Howes
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS Med 9:e1001339. 2012
    ..We present a continuous evidence-based prevalence map of G6PDd and estimates of affected populations, together with a national index of relative haemolytic risk...
  3. doi request reprint G6PD deficiency: global distribution, genetic variants and primaquine therapy
    Rosalind E Howes
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Adv Parasitol 81:133-201. 2013
    ....
  4. pmc Global epidemiology of sickle haemoglobin in neonates: a contemporary geostatistical model-based map and population estimates
    Frédéric B Piel
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Lancet 381:142-51. 2013
    ..Moreover, the precision of available national estimates of heterozygous (AS) and homozygous (SS) neonates is unknown. We aimed to provide evidence-based estimates at various scales, with uncertainty measures...
  5. pmc The global public health significance of Plasmodium vivax
    Katherine E Battle
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Adv Parasitol 80:1-111. 2012
    ..This information along with recent data documenting the severe morbid and fatal consequences of P. vivax infection indicates that the public health significance of P. vivax is likely to have been seriously underestimated...
  6. pmc The distribution of haemoglobin C and its prevalence in newborns in Africa
    Frédéric B Piel
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, United Kingdom
    Sci Rep 3:1671. 2013
    ..The expected annual numbers of AC and CC newborns in Africa were 672,117 (interquartile range (IQR): 642,116-705,163) and 28,703 (IQR: 26,027-31,958), respectively. These numbers are about two times previous estimates...
  7. pmc Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders
    Frédéric B Piel
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, United Kingdom
    Hum Mutat 34:937-44. 2013
    ..As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed...
  8. pmc A long neglected world malaria map: Plasmodium vivax endemicity in 2010
    Peter W Gething
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 6:e1814. 2012
    ..falciparum, representing a barrier to rational strategies for control and elimination. Here we present the first systematic effort to map the global endemicity of this hitherto neglected parasite...
  9. ncbi request reprint Geographical variation in Plasmodium vivax relapse
    Katherine E Battle
    Department of Zoology, Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Malar J 13:144. 2014
    ..Here observed patterns of relapse periodicity are used to generate predictions of relapse incidence within geographic regions representative of varying parasite transmission...
  10. pmc Global distribution of the sickle cell gene and geographical confirmation of the malaria hypothesis
    Frédéric B Piel
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Commun 1:104. 2010
    ..We find geographical support for the malaria hypothesis globally; the relationship is relatively strong in Africa but cannot be resolved in the Americas or in Asia...
  11. pmc The global distribution of the Duffy blood group
    Rosalind E Howes
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Tinbergen Building, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Nat Commun 2:266. 2011
    ..vivax malaria parasite...
  12. pmc The international limits and population at risk of Plasmodium vivax transmission in 2009
    Carlos A Guerra
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 4:e774. 2010
    ..vivax malaria, together with estimates of the human population at risk (PAR) of any level of transmission in 2009...
  13. doi request reprint Global spread of dengue virus types: mapping the 70 year history
    Jane P Messina
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK Electronic address
    Trends Microbiol 22:138-46. 2014
    ..These show the worldwide expansion of the types, the expansion of disease hyperendemicity, and the establishment of an increasingly important infectious disease of global public health significance. ..
  14. pmc Developing global maps of the dominant anopheles vectors of human malaria
    Simon I Hay
    Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
    PLoS Med 7:e1000209. 2010
    ..Simon Hay and colleagues describe how the Malaria Atlas Project has collated anopheline occurrence data to map the geographic distributions of the dominant mosquito vectors of human malaria...