Thomas House

Summary

Affiliation: University of Warwick
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Estimation of outbreak severity and transmissibility: Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in households
    Thomas House
    Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK
    BMC Med 10:117. 2012
  2. doi request reprint Deterministic epidemic models with explicit household structure
    Thomas House
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    Math Biosci 213:29-39. 2008
  3. pmc Modelling behavioural contagion
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    J R Soc Interface 8:909-12. 2011
  4. pmc Modelling the impact of local reactive school closures on critical care provision during an influenza pandemic
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 278:2753-60. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Epidemic prediction and control in clustered populations
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    J Theor Biol 272:1-7. 2011
  6. pmc Insights from unifying modern approximations to infections on networks
    Thomas House
    Department of Biological Sciences, Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, UK
    J R Soc Interface 8:67-73. 2011
  7. pmc The impact of contact tracing in clustered populations
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom
    PLoS Comput Biol 6:e1000721. 2010
  8. pmc Contingency planning for a deliberate release of smallpox in Great Britain--the role of geographical scale and contact structure
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    BMC Infect Dis 10:25. 2010
  9. doi request reprint A motif-based approach to network epidemics
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute and Dept Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    Bull Math Biol 71:1693-706. 2009
  10. pmc Household structure and infectious disease transmission
    T House
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    Epidemiol Infect 137:654-61. 2009

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. pmc Estimation of outbreak severity and transmissibility: Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in households
    Thomas House
    Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK
    BMC Med 10:117. 2012
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Deterministic epidemic models with explicit household structure
    Thomas House
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    Math Biosci 213:29-39. 2008
    ..Finally we consider the use of prophylactic vaccination, responsive vaccination, or antivirals to combat epidemic spread and focus on whether it is optimal to target controls at entire households or to treat individuals independently...
  3. pmc Modelling behavioural contagion
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    J R Soc Interface 8:909-12. 2011
    ..A parsimonious model is proposed that incorporates several observed features of behavioural contagion not seen in existing epidemic model schemes, leading to metastable behavioural dynamics...
  4. pmc Modelling the impact of local reactive school closures on critical care provision during an influenza pandemic
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 278:2753-60. 2011
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Epidemic prediction and control in clustered populations
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    J Theor Biol 272:1-7. 2011
    ....
  6. pmc Insights from unifying modern approximations to infections on networks
    Thomas House
    Department of Biological Sciences, Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, UK
    J R Soc Interface 8:67-73. 2011
    ..The success of these new models provides improved understanding about the interaction of network structure and transmission dynamics...
  7. pmc The impact of contact tracing in clustered populations
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom
    PLoS Comput Biol 6:e1000721. 2010
    ..In this way we contribute to the general theory of network-based interventions against infectious disease...
  8. pmc Contingency planning for a deliberate release of smallpox in Great Britain--the role of geographical scale and contact structure
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    BMC Infect Dis 10:25. 2010
    ..consider two key questions currently unanswered in the literature: firstly, what is the optimal spatial scale for intervention; and secondly, how sensitive are results to the modelling assumptions made about the pattern of human contacts?..
  9. doi request reprint A motif-based approach to network epidemics
    Thomas House
    Warwick Mathematics Institute and Dept Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    Bull Math Biol 71:1693-706. 2009
    ..We present a more general approach, based on the prevalence of different four-motifs, in the context of ODE approximations to network dynamics. This is shown to outperform existing models for a range of small world networks...
  10. pmc Household structure and infectious disease transmission
    T House
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
    Epidemiol Infect 137:654-61. 2009
    ..Since these benefits of childhood vaccination are a product of correlations between household size and number of dependent children in the household, our results are qualitatively robust for a variety of disease scenarios...
  11. doi request reprint The role of routine versus random movements on the spread of disease in Great Britain
    Leon Danon
    Department of Biological Sciences and Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    Epidemics 1:250-8. 2009
    ..We also show that spurious long distance movements present in the census data do not have a significant impact on the development of a potential epidemic in Great Britain...
  12. pmc Networks and the epidemiology of infectious disease
    Leon Danon
    School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    Interdiscip Perspect Infect Dis 2011:284909. 2011
    ..As such, considerable importance is placed on analytical approaches and statistical methods which are both rapidly expanding fields. Throughout this review we restrict our attention to epidemiological issues...
  13. ncbi request reprint Endemic infections are always possible on regular networks
    Charo I Del Genio
    Warwick Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, United Kingdom and Centre for Complexity Science, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, United Kingdom and Warwick Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research WIDER Centre, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, United Kingdom and Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Nothnitzer Strasse 38, Dresden D 01187, Germany
    Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 88:040801. 2013
    ..Our work indicates that intrinsic structural properties always allow the spread of epidemics on regular networks. ..
  14. doi request reprint The rate of convergence to early asymptotic behaviour in age-structured epidemic models
    Christopher A Rhodes
    Warwick Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK
    Theor Popul Biol 85:58-62. 2013
    ..We make use of dynamical systems theory to show that for some reasonable parameter values, this convergence can be slow. Such a possibility should therefore be considered when parametrising age-structured epidemic models...