A Rus Hoelzel

Summary

Affiliation: University of Durham
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Evolution of population genetic structure of the British roe deer by natural and anthropogenic processes (Capreolus capreolus)
    Karis H Baker
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
    Ecol Evol 3:89-102. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Evolution of population structure in a highly social top predator, the killer whale
    A Rus Hoelzel
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 24:1407-15. 2007
  3. pmc Genetic and morphometric differentiation between island and mainland southern elephant seal populations
    A R Hoelzel
    Department of Biological Sciences, Durham University, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 268:325-32. 2001
  4. pmc Low worldwide genetic diversity in the killer whale (Orcinus orca): implications for demographic history
    A Rus Hoelzel
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:1467-73. 2002
  5. pmc Ancient genomes
    A Rus Hoelzel
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Genome Biol 6:239. 2005
  6. pmc Habitat structure and the dispersal of male and female bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)
    Ada Natoli
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 272:1217-26. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Population structure and speciation in the genus Tursiops based on microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA analyses
    Ada Natoli
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, UK
    J Evol Biol 17:363-75. 2004
  8. pmc Rapid response of a marine mammal species to holocene climate and habitat change
    Mark de Bruyn
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
    PLoS Genet 5:e1000554. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Female philopatry in coastal basins and male dispersion across the North Atlantic in a highly mobile marine species, the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus)
    Daniel Engelhaupt
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:4193-205. 2009
  10. ncbi request reprint Long-range paternal gene flow in the southern elephant seal
    Anna Fabiani
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
    Science 299:676. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. pmc Evolution of population genetic structure of the British roe deer by natural and anthropogenic processes (Capreolus capreolus)
    Karis H Baker
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
    Ecol Evol 3:89-102. 2012
    ..We discuss the implications for the evolution of diversity of the integration of natural processes with anthropogenic influences on population size and distribution...
  2. ncbi request reprint Evolution of population structure in a highly social top predator, the killer whale
    A Rus Hoelzel
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 24:1407-15. 2007
    ..Our data indicate a key role for social and foraging behavior in the evolution of genetic structure among conspecific populations of the killer whale...
  3. pmc Genetic and morphometric differentiation between island and mainland southern elephant seal populations
    A R Hoelzel
    Department of Biological Sciences, Durham University, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 268:325-32. 2001
    ..Morphological differences may suggest different selective environments at the two sites...
  4. pmc Low worldwide genetic diversity in the killer whale (Orcinus orca): implications for demographic history
    A Rus Hoelzel
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:1467-73. 2002
    ..The regional lack of variation is likely to be due to the strict matrilineal expansion of local populations. The worldwide pattern and paucity of diversity may indicate a historical bottleneck as an additional factor...
  5. pmc Ancient genomes
    A Rus Hoelzel
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Genome Biol 6:239. 2005
    ..In an application of modern genomic methods to material from the Pleistocene, a recent study has instead undertaken to clone and sequence a portion of the ancient genome of the cave bear...
  6. pmc Habitat structure and the dispersal of male and female bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)
    Ada Natoli
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 272:1217-26. 2005
    ..These data imply a mechanism for the evolutionary structuring of populations based on local habitat dependence for both males and females...
  7. ncbi request reprint Population structure and speciation in the genus Tursiops based on microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA analyses
    Ada Natoli
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, UK
    J Evol Biol 17:363-75. 2004
    ..aduncus, were each highly differentiated from populations of the truncatus morphotype, and from each other, suggesting a possible third species represented by the South African aduncus type...
  8. pmc Rapid response of a marine mammal species to holocene climate and habitat change
    Mark de Bruyn
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
    PLoS Genet 5:e1000554. 2009
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Female philopatry in coastal basins and male dispersion across the North Atlantic in a highly mobile marine species, the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus)
    Daniel Engelhaupt
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:4193-205. 2009
    ..Our analyses indicate a previously unknown fidelity of females to coastal basins either side of the North Atlantic, and suggest the movement of males among these populations for breeding...
  10. ncbi request reprint Long-range paternal gene flow in the southern elephant seal
    Anna Fabiani
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
    Science 299:676. 2003
  11. doi request reprint Unexpected panmixia in a long-lived, deep-sea fish with well-defined spawning habitat and relatively low fecundity
    Thomas A White
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:2563-73. 2009
    ..We discuss possible evolutionary mechanisms that could explain the results, which show the opposite pattern, with effective panmixia across thousands of kilometres in the North Atlantic...
  12. pmc Low worldwide genetic diversity in the basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus)
    A Rus Hoelzel
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH13LE, UK
    Biol Lett 2:639-42. 2006
    ..We provide evidence for a bottleneck event within the Holocene, estimate an effective population size (Ne) that is low for a globally distributed species, and discuss the implications...
  13. doi request reprint Recent diversification of a marine genus (Tursiops spp.) tracks habitat preference and environmental change
    Andre E Moura
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, DH1 3LE, UK Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5 7, DK 1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark Biological Department, UAE University, P O Box 17551, Al Ain, UAE and School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia
    Syst Biol 62:865-77. 2013
    ..Together these data suggest the tracking of habitat preference during geographic expansions, followed by transition points reflecting habitat shifts, which were likely associated with periods of environmental change...
  14. ncbi request reprint Social kin associations and genetic structuring of striped dolphin populations (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the Mediterranean Sea
    Stefania Gaspari
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK
    Mol Ecol 16:2922-33. 2007
    ..Together these data emphasize the importance of the social cohesion of kin in small groups to the structuring of striped dolphin populations in this environment...
  15. pmc Genetic isolation of a now extinct population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)
    Courtney Nichols
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1611-6. 2007
    ..The data indicate that this was a local extinction, and not a case of historical range shift or contraction. One possible interpretation is a declining metapopulation and conservation need for this species in the UK...
  16. pmc A Romani mitochondrial haplotype in England 500 years before their recorded arrival in Britain
    Ana L Töpf
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Biol Lett 1:280-2. 2005
    ....
  17. doi request reprint Rapid increase in southern elephant seal genetic diversity after a founder event
    Mark de Bruyn
    Molecular Ecology and Fisheries Genetics Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, Bangor University, Deiniol Road, Bangor, UK, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA, Climate Change Institute and School of Earth and Climate Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME, USA, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Pisa, Pisa, Italy, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20133078. 2014
    ....
  18. pmc Dietary differentiation and the evolution of population genetic structure in a highly mobile carnivore
    Małgorzata Pilot
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e39341. 2012
    ....
  19. pmc Killer whales are capable of vocal learning
    Andrew D Foote
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Biol Lett 2:509-12. 2006
    ..We also find differences in call usage (compared to the natal pod) that may reflect the absence of a repertoire model from tutors or some unknown effect related to isolation or context...
  20. doi request reprint Balancing and directional selection at exon-2 of the MHC DQB1 locus among populations of odontocete cetaceans
    Demetrios Vassilakos
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 26:681-9. 2009
    ..However, outliers in the F(ST) comparisons and the analysis of putative functional residues suggested incidences of directional selection in local populations...
  21. pmc Sex-specific foraging strategies and resource partitioning in the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina)
    Rebecca Lewis
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:2901-7. 2006
    ..We discuss the possibility that individual southern elephant seals are pursuing specialist foraging strategies to avoid competition, both with one another, and with the South American sea lions that breed nearby...
  22. ncbi request reprint Tracing the phylogeography of human populations in Britain based on 4th-11th century mtDNA genotypes
    A L Töpf
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 23:152-61. 2006
    ..This is in contrast with a late Saxon site in Norwich, where the genetic signature is consistent with more recent immigrations from the south, possibly as part of the Saxon invasions...
  23. ncbi request reprint Phylogeography and alpha taxonomy of the common dolphin (Delphinus sp.)
    A Natoli
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, UK
    J Evol Biol 19:943-54. 2006
    ..We observed low genetic differentiation among the short-beaked populations across a large geographical scale. We interpret these phylogeographical patterns in the context of life history and population structure in related species...
  24. ncbi request reprint Environment: whale-call response to masking boat noise
    Andrew D Foote
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Nature 428:910. 2004
    ..This result indicates that these whales adjust their behaviour to compensate for anthropogenic noise once it reaches a threshold level...
  25. doi request reprint Social cohesion among kin, gene flow without dispersal and the evolution of population genetic structure in the killer whale (Orcinus orca)
    M Pilot
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, UK
    J Evol Biol 23:20-31. 2010
    ..Taken together our results show how the killer whale breeding system, coupled with social, dispersal and foraging behaviour, contributes to the evolution of population genetic structure...
  26. ncbi request reprint Molecular genetic diversity and evolution at the MHC DQB locus in four species of pinnipeds
    A R Hoelzel
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, England
    Mol Biol Evol 16:611-8. 1999
    ..These results suggest a pattern of evolution of the immune response in pinnipeds similar to that in terrestrial mammal species...
  27. pmc Ancient human mtDNA genotypes from England reveal lost variation over the last millennium
    A L Töpf
    School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Biol Lett 3:550-3. 2007
    ..There was also increased representation of one of the ancient haplotypes in modern populations. We consider these results in the context of possible selection or stochastic processes...
  28. ncbi request reprint A phylogeny of Chinese species in the genus Phrynocephalus (Agamidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences
    Junfeng Pang
    Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223, China
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 27:398-409. 2003
    ..The phylogenies further suggest that the monophyly of the viviparous species may have resulted from vicariance, while recent dispersal may have been important in generating the pattern of variation among the oviparous species...