Angela Hodge

Summary

Affiliation: University of York
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Are microorganisms more effective than plants at competing for nitrogen?
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, PO Box 373, University of York, York, YO10 5YW UK
    Trends Plant Sci 5:304-8. 2000
  2. pmc Substantial nitrogen acquisition by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from organic material has implications for N cycling
    Angela Hodge
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5YW, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:13754-9. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Root decisions
    Angela Hodge
    Department of Biology, Area 14, University of York, York YO105YW, UK
    Plant Cell Environ 32:628-40. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Plastic plants and patchy soils
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, Area 14, PO Box 373, University of York, York YO10 5YW, UK
    J Exp Bot 57:401-11. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint N capture by Plantago lanceolata and Brassica napus from organic material: the influence of spatial dispersion, plant competition and an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, Area 2, The University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    J Exp Bot 54:2331-42. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint An arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus accelerates decomposition and acquires nitrogen directly from organic material
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York, YO10 5YW, UK
    Nature 413:297-9. 2001
  7. doi request reprint Growth and symbiotic effectiveness of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in organic matter in competition with soil bacteria
    Joanne Leigh
    Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York, UK
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 76:428-38. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Mycorrhizal respiration: implications for global scaling relationships
    John K Hughes
    Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK
    Trends Plant Sci 13:583-8. 2008
  9. doi request reprint Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can transfer substantial amounts of nitrogen to their host plant from organic material
    Joanne Leigh
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    New Phytol 181:199-207. 2009
  10. doi request reprint Temperature dependence of respiration in roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
    Owen K Atkin
    Department of Biology, The University of York, York, UK
    New Phytol 182:188-99. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications12

  1. ncbi request reprint Are microorganisms more effective than plants at competing for nitrogen?
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, PO Box 373, University of York, York, YO10 5YW UK
    Trends Plant Sci 5:304-8. 2000
    ..Consequently, it is not possible to discuss plant-microorganism competition without taking into account this spatiotemporal context...
  2. pmc Substantial nitrogen acquisition by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from organic material has implications for N cycling
    Angela Hodge
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5YW, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:13754-9. 2010
    ..The large biomass and high N demand of AM fungi means that they represent a global N pool equivalent in magnitude to fine roots and play a substantial and hitherto overlooked role in the nitrogen cycle...
  3. doi request reprint Root decisions
    Angela Hodge
    Department of Biology, Area 14, University of York, York YO105YW, UK
    Plant Cell Environ 32:628-40. 2009
    ..Finally, there is increasing evidence that root-root interactions are much more sophisticated than previously thought, and the evidence for roots to identify self from non-self roots will be briefly discussed...
  4. ncbi request reprint Plastic plants and patchy soils
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, Area 14, PO Box 373, University of York, York YO10 5YW, UK
    J Exp Bot 57:401-11. 2006
    ..This could potentially be important to the host plant, as generally, root proliferation responses are more important for interspecific plant, than plant-microbial, competition...
  5. ncbi request reprint N capture by Plantago lanceolata and Brassica napus from organic material: the influence of spatial dispersion, plant competition and an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, Area 2, The University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    J Exp Bot 54:2331-42. 2003
    ..mosseae inoculum was present compared to when G. mosseae was absent (i.e. 35% versus 19% of the N originally added)...
  6. ncbi request reprint An arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus accelerates decomposition and acquires nitrogen directly from organic material
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York, YO10 5YW, UK
    Nature 413:297-9. 2001
    ..Hyphal growth of the fungal partner was increased in the presence of the organic material, independently of the host plant...
  7. doi request reprint Growth and symbiotic effectiveness of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in organic matter in competition with soil bacteria
    Joanne Leigh
    Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York, UK
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 76:428-38. 2011
    ..Collectively, these data demonstrate antagonistic interactions between AM fungi and bacteria that reflect resource competition for decomposition products...
  8. doi request reprint Mycorrhizal respiration: implications for global scaling relationships
    John K Hughes
    Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK
    Trends Plant Sci 13:583-8. 2008
    ..Failure to examine properly the role of colonization in determining root R means that current interpretations of root and soil respiration data might be flawed...
  9. doi request reprint Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can transfer substantial amounts of nitrogen to their host plant from organic material
    Joanne Leigh
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    New Phytol 181:199-207. 2009
    ..20% of plant N may have been patch derived. These findings indicate that uptake from organic N could be important in AM symbiosis for both plant and fungal partners and that some AM fungi may acquire inorganic N from organic sources...
  10. doi request reprint Temperature dependence of respiration in roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
    Owen K Atkin
    Department of Biology, The University of York, York, UK
    New Phytol 182:188-99. 2009
    ..Overall, these results highlight the way in which AM colonization alters the underlying components of respiratory metabolism and the response of root R to sustained changes in growth temperature...
  11. doi request reprint Mycorrhizas and biomass crops: opportunities for future sustainable development
    Deirdre C Rooney
    Department of Biology, University of York, York, YO10 5YW, UK
    Trends Plant Sci 14:542-9. 2009
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Real-time PCR and microscopy: are the two methods measuring the same unit of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal abundance?
    Hannes A Gamper
    University of York, Department of Biology, P O Box 373, Heslington, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Fungal Genet Biol 45:581-96. 2008
    ..Therefore, although real-time PCR can reproducibly and accurately quantify AMF nucleic acids, these are poorly correlated with visual measures because of spatial heterogeneity...