Jane K Hill

Summary

Affiliation: University of York
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Climate change and evolutionary adaptations at species' range margins
    Jane K Hill
    Department of Biology, University of York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
    Annu Rev Entomol 56:143-59. 2011
  2. pmc Responses of butterflies to twentieth century climate warming: implications for future ranges
    J K Hill
    Department of Biology, PO Box 373, University of York, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:2163-71. 2002
  3. pmc Genetic diversity in butterflies: Interactive effects of habitat fragmentation and climate-driven range expansion
    Jane K Hill
    Department of Biology Area 18, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Biol Lett 2:152-4. 2006
  4. doi request reprint Temperature-dependent alterations in host use drive rapid range expansion in a butterfly
    Rachel M Pateman
    Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK
    Science 336:1028-30. 2012
  5. pmc Ecological impacts of tropical forest fragmentation: how consistent are patterns in species richness and nestedness?
    Jane K Hill
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:3265-76. 2011
  6. pmc Protected areas facilitate species' range expansions
    Chris D Thomas
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:14063-8. 2012
  7. pmc Habitat associations of species show consistent but weak responses to climate
    Andrew J Suggitt
    Department of Biology, University of York, Wentworth Way, York Y010 5DD, UK
    Biol Lett 8:590-3. 2012
  8. doi request reprint Rapid range shifts of species associated with high levels of climate warming
    I Ching Chen
    Department of Biology, University of York, Wentworth Way, York YO10 5DD, UK
    Science 333:1024-6. 2011
  9. ncbi request reprint Role of larval host plants in the climate-driven range expansion of the butterfly Polygonia c-album
    Brigitte Braschler
    Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York, UK
    J Anim Ecol 76:415-23. 2007
  10. pmc Species richness changes lag behind climate change
    Rosa Menéndez
    University of York, Department of Biology, Area 18, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:1465-70. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. doi request reprint Climate change and evolutionary adaptations at species' range margins
    Jane K Hill
    Department of Biology, University of York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
    Annu Rev Entomol 56:143-59. 2011
    ..A better understanding of the extent and speed of adaptation will be crucial to the responses of biodiversity and ecosystems to climate change...
  2. pmc Responses of butterflies to twentieth century climate warming: implications for future ranges
    J K Hill
    Department of Biology, PO Box 373, University of York, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:2163-71. 2002
    ..These revised estimates are likely to be more realistic predictions of future butterfly range sizes...
  3. pmc Genetic diversity in butterflies: Interactive effects of habitat fragmentation and climate-driven range expansion
    Jane K Hill
    Department of Biology Area 18, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Biol Lett 2:152-4. 2006
    ..The continued widespread loss of suitable habitats in the future may increase the likelihood of loss of genetic diversity in expanding species, which may affect whether or not species can adapt to future environmental change...
  4. doi request reprint Temperature-dependent alterations in host use drive rapid range expansion in a butterfly
    Rachel M Pateman
    Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK
    Science 336:1028-30. 2012
    ..Interactions among species are often seen as constraints on species' responses to climate change, but we show that temperature-dependent changes to interspecific interactions can also facilitate change...
  5. pmc Ecological impacts of tropical forest fragmentation: how consistent are patterns in species richness and nestedness?
    Jane K Hill
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:3265-76. 2011
    ..Although all four taxa exhibited high levels of nestedness, patterns of species turnover were also idiosyncratic, and thus even species-poor sites contributed to landscape-scale biodiversity, particularly for insects...
  6. pmc Protected areas facilitate species' range expansions
    Chris D Thomas
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:14063-8. 2012
    ..These findings highlight the importance of current PAs for facilitating range expansions and show that a small subset of the landscape receives a high proportion of colonizations by range-expanding species...
  7. pmc Habitat associations of species show consistent but weak responses to climate
    Andrew J Suggitt
    Department of Biology, University of York, Wentworth Way, York Y010 5DD, UK
    Biol Lett 8:590-3. 2012
    ..1.3% of individuals from open to shade, per degree Celsius) is unlikely to buffer species from impacts of regional climate warming...
  8. doi request reprint Rapid range shifts of species associated with high levels of climate warming
    I Ching Chen
    Department of Biology, University of York, Wentworth Way, York YO10 5DD, UK
    Science 333:1024-6. 2011
    ..Rapid average shifts derive from a wide diversity of responses by individual species...
  9. ncbi request reprint Role of larval host plants in the climate-driven range expansion of the butterfly Polygonia c-album
    Brigitte Braschler
    Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York, UK
    J Anim Ecol 76:415-23. 2007
    ..Our findings suggest that observed differences in climate-driven range shifts of generalist vs. specialist species may increase in the future and are likely to lead to greatly altered community composition...
  10. pmc Species richness changes lag behind climate change
    Rosa Menéndez
    University of York, Department of Biology, Area 18, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:1465-70. 2006
    ..Our results imply that it may be decades or centuries before the species richness and composition of biological communities adjusts to the current climate...
  11. ncbi request reprint Range retractions and extinction in the face of climate warming
    Chris D Thomas
    Department of Biology Area 18, University of York, PO Box373, York, UK
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:415-6. 2006
    ..The new evidence suggests that climate-driven extinctions and range retractions are already widespread...
  12. pmc Evolutionary trade-offs between reproduction and dispersal in populations at expanding range boundaries
    Clare L Hughes
    Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 270:S147-50. 2003
    ....
  13. pmc Elevation increases in moth assemblages over 42 years on a tropical mountain
    I Ching Chen
    Department of Biology, University of York, P O Box 373, York YO10 5YW, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:1479-83. 2009
    ..As the highest mountain in one of the most biodiverse regions of the world, Mount Kinabalu is a globally important refuge for terrestrial species that become restricted to high altitudes by climate warming...
  14. ncbi request reprint The response of avian feeding guilds to tropical forest disturbance
    Michael A Gray
    Department of Biology Area 18, University of York, York YO10 5YW, United Kingdom
    Conserv Biol 21:133-41. 2007
    ..Overall, general patterns governed the responses of species to habitat disturbance, and the differential responses of guilds suggested that disturbance affects trophic organization and thus ecosystem functioning...
  15. doi request reprint Wind selection and drift compensation optimize migratory pathways in a high-flying moth
    Jason W Chapman
    Plant and Invertebrate Ecology Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 18:514-8. 2008
    ..We conclude that nocturnally migrating moths use a compass and an inherited preferred direction to optimize their migratory track...