Robert Harris

Summary

Affiliation: University of Birmingham
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Effects of endocrine disruptors on dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase and enzymes involved in PAPS synthesis: genomic and nongenomic pathways
    Robert Harris
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Environ Health Perspect 115:51-4. 2007
  2. ncbi Sulfotransferase inhibition: potential impact of diet and environmental chemicals on steroid metabolism and drug detoxification
    R M Harris
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Curr Drug Metab 9:269-75. 2008
  3. ncbi Phytoestrogens are potent inhibitors of estrogen sulfation: implications for breast cancer risk and treatment
    R M Harris
    School of Biosciences and Medical School, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab 89:1779-87. 2004
  4. ncbi Phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens: the contribution of diet and environment to endocrine disruption
    R H Waring
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 108:213-20. 2008
  5. ncbi Endocrine disrupters: a human risk?
    R H Waring
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, UK
    Mol Cell Endocrinol 244:2-9. 2005
  6. ncbi Sulfation of "estrogenic" alkylphenols and 17beta-estradiol by human platelet phenol sulfotransferases
    R M Harris
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    J Biol Chem 275:159-66. 2000
  7. ncbi Do dietary phytoestrogens influence susceptibility to hormone-dependent cancer by disrupting the metabolism of endogenous oestrogens?
    C J Kirk
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, U K
    Biochem Soc Trans 29:209-16. 2001
  8. ncbi Effects of culture with TNF-alpha, TGF-beta and insulin on sulphotransferase (SULT 1A1 and 1A3) activity in human colon and neuronal cell lines
    E Davies
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Toxicol In Vitro 18:749-54. 2004
  9. ncbi Non-genomic effects of endocrine disrupters: inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferase by phenols and chlorinated phenols
    R M Harris
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK
    Mol Cell Endocrinol 244:72-4. 2005
  10. pmc Bone marrow-derived cells contribute to epithelial engraftment during wound healing
    Xenia Borue
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, P O Box 208035, New Haven, CT 06520 8035, USA
    Am J Pathol 165:1767-72. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. pmc Effects of endocrine disruptors on dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase and enzymes involved in PAPS synthesis: genomic and nongenomic pathways
    Robert Harris
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Environ Health Perspect 115:51-4. 2007
    ..Studies in rodents have shown that the conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to DHEA-sulfate is involved in learning and the memory process...
  2. ncbi Sulfotransferase inhibition: potential impact of diet and environmental chemicals on steroid metabolism and drug detoxification
    R M Harris
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
    Curr Drug Metab 9:269-75. 2008
    ....
  3. ncbi Phytoestrogens are potent inhibitors of estrogen sulfation: implications for breast cancer risk and treatment
    R M Harris
    School of Biosciences and Medical School, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab 89:1779-87. 2004
    ..Hence, dietary flavonoids may be able to influence the bioavailability of endogenous estrogens, and disrupt endocrine balance, by increasing the ratio of active estrogens to inactive estrogen sulfates in human tissues...
  4. ncbi Phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens: the contribution of diet and environment to endocrine disruption
    R H Waring
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 108:213-20. 2008
    ..Endocrine disrupting effects in man may be multifactorial when components from both the diet and the environment act at the same point in steroid metabolism...
  5. ncbi Endocrine disrupters: a human risk?
    R H Waring
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, UK
    Mol Cell Endocrinol 244:2-9. 2005
    ..This may be of long-term concern since traces of EDs such as plasticisers, brominated fire retardants, sunscreen agents and cosmetic ingredients are widely distributed in the environment and in human biofluids...
  6. ncbi Sulfation of "estrogenic" alkylphenols and 17beta-estradiol by human platelet phenol sulfotransferases
    R M Harris
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    J Biol Chem 275:159-66. 2000
    ..We conclude that by acting either as substrates or inhibitors of SULT1A1/2, alkylphenols may influence the sulfation, and hence the excretion, of estrogens and other phenol sulfotransferase substrates in humans...
  7. ncbi Do dietary phytoestrogens influence susceptibility to hormone-dependent cancer by disrupting the metabolism of endogenous oestrogens?
    C J Kirk
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, U K
    Biochem Soc Trans 29:209-16. 2001
    ..Hence the inhibition of sulphotransferases by dietary phytoestrogens may have complex effects upon human susceptibility to breast cancer...
  8. ncbi Effects of culture with TNF-alpha, TGF-beta and insulin on sulphotransferase (SULT 1A1 and 1A3) activity in human colon and neuronal cell lines
    E Davies
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Toxicol In Vitro 18:749-54. 2004
    ....
  9. ncbi Non-genomic effects of endocrine disrupters: inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferase by phenols and chlorinated phenols
    R M Harris
    School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK
    Mol Cell Endocrinol 244:72-4. 2005
    ..Our results demonstrate a potential non-genomic mechanism of action for these compounds and suggest that, where viable alternatives exist, both phenols substituted in the 2-position and their metabolic precursors should be avoided...
  10. pmc Bone marrow-derived cells contribute to epithelial engraftment during wound healing
    Xenia Borue
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, P O Box 208035, New Haven, CT 06520 8035, USA
    Am J Pathol 165:1767-72. 2004
    ....