U Frith

Summary

Affiliation: University College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Reputation management: in autism, generosity is its own reward
    Uta Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Curr Biol 21:R994-5. 2011
  2. ncbi request reprint Autism--the quest continues: reflections on the Novartis symposium on autism, June 2002
    Uta Frith
    Department of Psychology, UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Neuroreport 13:1703-5. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Mind blindness and the brain in autism
    U Frith
    UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17 Queen Square, WC1N 3AR, London, United Kingdom
    Neuron 32:969-79. 2001
  4. pmc The social brain: allowing humans to boldly go where no other species has been
    Uta Frith
    ICN, UCL, London, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:165-76. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint Are there sex differences in the brain basis of literacy related skills? Evidence from reading and spelling impairments after early unilateral brain damage
    U Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Neuropsychologia 39:1485-8. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint Q & A. Uta Frith
    Uta Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK
    Curr Biol 18:R451-3. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Egocentrism, allocentrism, and Asperger syndrome
    Uta Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Conscious Cogn 14:719-38. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Emanuel Miller lecture: confusions and controversies about Asperger syndrome
    Uta Frith
    UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 45:672-86. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint What framework should we use for understanding developmental disorders?
    U Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, England
    Dev Neuropsychol 20:555-63. 2001
  10. ncbi request reprint Fractionation of visual memory: evidence from a case with multiple neurodevelopmental impairments
    L Cipolotti
    Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 37:455-65. 1999

Detail Information

Publications61

  1. doi request reprint Reputation management: in autism, generosity is its own reward
    Uta Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Curr Biol 21:R994-5. 2011
    ..A recent study has found that autistic people donate the same to charity regardless of whether they are observed. This is not because they are oblivious to others, but because they are free of hypocrisy...
  2. ncbi request reprint Autism--the quest continues: reflections on the Novartis symposium on autism, June 2002
    Uta Frith
    Department of Psychology, UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Neuroreport 13:1703-5. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Mind blindness and the brain in autism
    U Frith
    UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17 Queen Square, WC1N 3AR, London, United Kingdom
    Neuron 32:969-79. 2001
    ..The brain abnormality that results in mentalizing failure in autism may involve weak connections between components of this system...
  4. pmc The social brain: allowing humans to boldly go where no other species has been
    Uta Frith
    ICN, UCL, London, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:165-76. 2010
    ..The use of deliberate social signals can serve to increase reputation and trust and facilitates teaching. This is likely to be a critical factor in the steep cultural ascent of mankind...
  5. ncbi request reprint Are there sex differences in the brain basis of literacy related skills? Evidence from reading and spelling impairments after early unilateral brain damage
    U Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Neuropsychologia 39:1485-8. 2001
    ..The results support the hypothesis that specialised substrates, which underlie literacy acquisition, have limited plasticity and may be more strongly lateralised to the left hemisphere in males than in females...
  6. ncbi request reprint Q & A. Uta Frith
    Uta Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK
    Curr Biol 18:R451-3. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Egocentrism, allocentrism, and Asperger syndrome
    Uta Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Conscious Cogn 14:719-38. 2005
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Emanuel Miller lecture: confusions and controversies about Asperger syndrome
    Uta Frith
    UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 45:672-86. 2004
    ..Hans Asperger drew attention to individuals who show the core symptoms of autism in the presence of high verbal intelligence...
  9. ncbi request reprint What framework should we use for understanding developmental disorders?
    U Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, England
    Dev Neuropsychol 20:555-63. 2001
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Fractionation of visual memory: evidence from a case with multiple neurodevelopmental impairments
    L Cipolotti
    Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 37:455-65. 1999
    ..These findings indicate that different domains of the visual memory system can be fractionated developmentally. In particular, it demonstrates that topographical memory can develop independently from other aspects of visual memory...
  11. ncbi request reprint Interacting minds--a biological basis
    C D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Science 286:1692-5. 1999
    ..These observations suggest that the ability to mentalize has evolved from a system for representing actions...
  12. ncbi request reprint "Hey John": signals conveying communicative intention toward the self activate brain regions associated with "mentalizing," regardless of modality
    Knut K W Kampe
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3AR, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 23:5258-63. 2003
    ..These regions are part of a network that has been consistently activated when people are asked to think about the mental states of others. Activation of this network is independent of arousal as measured by changes in pupil diameter...
  13. ncbi request reprint Exploring the cognitive phenotype of autism: weak "central coherence" in parents and siblings of children with autism: II. Real-life skills and preferences
    J Briskman
    Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College, London, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 42:309-16. 2001
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint An islet of social ability in Asperger Syndrome: judging social attributes from faces
    Sarah White
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Brain Cogn 61:69-77. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that there are dissociable subcomponents to social cognition and that not all of these are compromised in Asperger Syndrome...
  15. doi request reprint Mindblind eyes: an absence of spontaneous theory of mind in Asperger syndrome
    Atsushi Senju
    Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck, University of London, London, UK
    Science 325:883-5. 2009
    ..This was not the case for individuals with Asperger syndrome (n = 19). Thus, these individuals do not attribute mental states spontaneously, but they may be able to do so in explicit tasks through compensatory learning...
  16. ncbi request reprint Thinking about intentions
    H E M den Ouden
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University College London, UK
    Neuroimage 28:787-96. 2005
    ..This was a different region from a more anterior, inferior dorsal mPFC region that responded to intentional causality. This suggests that different regions of mPFC play different roles in thinking about intentions...
  17. ncbi request reprint Left posterior BA37 is involved in object recognition: a TMS study
    L Stewart
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Alexander House, 17 Queen Square, WC1N 3AR, London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 39:1-6. 2001
    ..This study corroborates the finding from a recent imaging study, that the most posterior part of left hemispheric BA37 has a necessary role in object recognition...
  18. ncbi request reprint Social cognition in humans
    Chris D Frith
    Welcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London, UK
    Curr Biol 17:R724-32. 2007
    ..We speculate that the development of these high level social signalling systems goes hand in hand with the development of consciousness...
  19. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of mentalizing
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Neuron 50:531-4. 2006
    ..Finally, the human brain has the unique ability to represent the mental states of the self and the other and the relationship between these mental states, making possible the communication of ideas...
  20. ncbi request reprint Vagaries of visual perception in autism
    Steven Dakin
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, Bath Street, London EC1V 9EL, United Kingdom
    Neuron 48:497-507. 2005
    ..Such an explanation may also provide a link between perceptual abnormalities and specific deficits in social cognition associated with autism...
  21. ncbi request reprint The role of sensorimotor impairments in dyslexia: a multiple case study of dyslexic children
    Sarah White
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Dev Sci 9:237-55; discussion 265-9. 2006
    ..Visual stress seems to account for a small proportion of dyslexics, independently of the commonly reported phonological deficit. However, there is little evidence for a causal role of auditory, motor or other visual impairments...
  22. ncbi request reprint Attention does not modulate neural responses to social stimuli in autism spectrum disorders
    Geoffrey Bird
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Neuroimage 31:1614-24. 2006
    ..We discuss how these results may suggest a mechanism to explain the reduced salience of social stimuli in ASD...
  23. pmc Genes for susceptibility to violence lurk in the brain
    Essi Viding
    Department of Psychology and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:6085-6. 2006
  24. ncbi request reprint How we predict what other people are going to do
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Brain Res 1079:36-46. 2006
    ..In this way, they provide an escape from the tyranny of strong emotions that are readily aroused in social interactions...
  25. ncbi request reprint The learning brain: lessons for education: a précis
    Sarah Jayne Blakemore
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Dev Sci 8:459-65. 2005
  26. ncbi request reprint Reading music modifies spatial mapping in pianists
    Lauren Stewart
    University College London, London, England
    Percept Psychophys 66:183-95. 2004
    ..We suggest that, as a result of learning to read and play keyboard music, pianists acquire vertical-to-horizontal visuomotor mappings that generalize outside the musical context...
  27. ncbi request reprint Social cognitive neuroscience: where are we heading?
    Sarah Jayne Blakemore
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3AR, UK
    Trends Cogn Sci 8:216-22. 2004
    ..Here, we explore some of the reasons why social cognitive neuroscience is captivating the interest of many researchers. We focus on its future, and what we believe are priority areas for further research...
  28. ncbi request reprint How does the brain deal with the social world?
    Sarah Jayne Blakemore
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Neuroreport 15:119-28. 2004
    ..In this review, we summarize recent work that has illuminated the neuro-cognitive basis of complex social interaction and communication in humans...
  29. doi request reprint Developing the Frith-Happé animations: a quick and objective test of Theory of Mind for adults with autism
    Sarah J White
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3AR, United Kingdom
    Autism Res 4:149-54. 2011
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Your own action influences how you perceive another person's action
    Antonia Hamilton
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Alexandra House, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 14:493-8. 2004
    ..We hypothesize that this effect can be understood in terms of overlapping neural systems for motor control and action-understanding if multiple models of possible observed and performed actions are processed...
  31. doi request reprint Revisiting the strange stories: revealing mentalizing impairments in autism
    Sarah White
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, United Kingdom
    Child Dev 80:1097-117. 2009
    ..Thus, a mentalizing deficit may affect understanding of biologic agents even when this does not explicitly require understanding others' mental states...
  32. ncbi request reprint Evidence for implicit sequence learning in dyslexia
    Steve W Kelly
    Department of Psychology, University of Keele, UK
    Dyslexia 8:43-52. 2002
    ..Learning of the sequence did not seem to depend on awareness of the sequence structure. These results suggest that automatic skill learning is intact in dyslexic individuals...
  33. doi request reprint Big heads, small details and autism
    Sarah White
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Neuropsychologia 47:1274-81. 2009
    ..Macrocephaly in the context of autism may therefore be a biological marker of abnormal neural connectivity, and of a local processing bias...
  34. pmc Understanding autism: insights from mind and brain
    Elisabeth L Hill
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 358:281-9. 2003
    ..In this paper, recent developments in the field of autism are outlined. In particular, we review the findings of the three main neuro-cognitive theories of autism: theory-of-mind deficit, weak central coherence and executive dysfunction...
  35. doi request reprint Implicit and explicit processes in social cognition
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, WC1N 3AR UK
    Neuron 60:503-10. 2008
    ..On the other hand, higher-level conscious processes are as likely to be selfish as prosocial...
  36. doi request reprint The self and its reputation in autism
    Chris D Frith
    Center for Functional Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, Building 30, 8000 Arhus C, Denmark
    Neuron 57:331-2. 2008
    ..We speculate that this may arise because autistic individuals are unaware that they will also gain or lose reputation in their partner's eyes...
  37. ncbi request reprint Brain changes after learning to read and play music
    Lauren Stewart
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N3AR, UK
    Neuroimage 20:71-83. 2003
    ..These activations suggest that music reading involves the automatic sensorimotor translation of a spatial code (written music) into a series of motor responses (keypresses)...
  38. ncbi request reprint Becoming a pianist. An fMRI study of musical literacy acquisition
    Lauren Stewart
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Alexandra House, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 999:204-8. 2003
    ..When subjects played melodies from musical notation after training, activation was seen in a cluster of voxels within the right superior parietal cortex consistent with the view that music reading involves spatial sensorimotor mapping...
  39. ncbi request reprint The impact of extensive medial frontal lobe damage on 'Theory of Mind' and cognition
    Chris M Bird
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK
    Brain 127:914-28. 2004
    ..Possible reasons for the discrepancies between our results and neuroimaging studies are discussed. We conclude that our findings urge caution against using functional imaging as the sole method of establishing cognitive neuroanatomy...
  40. ncbi request reprint Tactile sensitivity in Asperger syndrome
    Sarah Jayne Blakemore
    Department of Psychology, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Brain Cogn 61:5-13. 2006
    ..An abnormality in this process cannot therefore account for their tactile hypersensitivity...
  41. ncbi request reprint Reward value of attractiveness and gaze
    K K Kampe
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Nature 413:589. 2001
    ..Depending on the direction of gaze, attractiveness can thus activate dopaminergic regions that are strongly linked to reward prediction, indicating that central reward systems may be engaged during the initiation of social interactions...
  42. doi request reprint Levels of emotional awareness and autism: an fMRI study
    Giorgia Silani
    University College London, London, UK
    Soc Neurosci 3:97-112. 2008
    ....
  43. ncbi request reprint Autism spectrum disorder
    Uta Frith
    UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Curr Biol 15:R786-90. 2005
  44. pmc Development and neurophysiology of mentalizing
    Uta Frith
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Queen Square, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 358:459-73. 2003
    ..The activation of these components in concert appears to be critical to mentalizing...
  45. ncbi request reprint Brief report: cognitive processing of own emotions in individuals with autistic spectrum disorder and in their relatives
    Elisabeth Hill
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, United Kingdom
    J Autism Dev Disord 34:229-35. 2004
    ..The individuals with autism spectrum disorders were significantly more impaired in their emotion processing and were more depressed than those in the control and relative groups...
  46. ncbi request reprint TMS produces two dissociable types of speech disruption
    L Stewart
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, United Kingdom
    Neuroimage 13:472-8. 2001
    ..The findings provide a basis for the use of subthreshold stimulation over the extrarolandic speech disruption site in order to probe the functional properties of this area and to test psychological theories of linguistic function...
  47. ncbi request reprint Fractionation of visual memory: agency detection and its impairment in autism
    R J R Blair
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, WC1H 3AR, London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 40:108-18. 2002
    ..The data is interpreted in terms of reduced sensitivity to agency cues in individuals with autism and general information processing capacity...
  48. ncbi request reprint Family risk of dyslexia is continuous: individual differences in the precursors of reading skill
    Margaret J Snowling
    Department of Psychology, University of York, Heslington, United Kingdom
    Child Dev 74:358-73. 2003
    ..The findings are interpreted within an interactive model of reading development in which problems in establishing a phonological pathway in dyslexic families may be compensated early by children who have strong language skills...
  49. ncbi request reprint Theories of developmental dyslexia: insights from a multiple case study of dyslexic adults
    Franck Ramus
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK
    Brain 126:841-65. 2003
    ..Overall, the present data support the phonological theory of dyslexia, while acknowledging the presence of additional sensory and motor disorders in certain individuals...
  50. ncbi request reprint Autism, Asperger syndrome and brain mechanisms for the attribution of mental states to animated shapes
    Fulvia Castelli
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Brain 125:1839-49. 2002
    ..This finding suggests a physiological cause for the mentalizing dysfunction in autism: a bottleneck in the interaction between higher order and lower order perceptual processes...
  51. ncbi request reprint Theory of mind
    Chris Frith
    Functional Imaging Laboratory and Institute of Cognitive Neurosciences, University College London, UK
    Curr Biol 15:R644-6. 2005
  52. ncbi request reprint Evidence for an articulatory awareness deficit in adult dyslexics
    Sarah Griffiths
    UCL, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London, UK
    Dyslexia 8:14-21. 2002
    ..We hypothesize that information about articulatory movements for specific phonemes is less accessible to dyslexics because of a deficient phonological processing system...
  53. ncbi request reprint The relationship between motor control and phonology in dyslexic children
    Franck Ramus
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 44:712-22. 2003
    ..Tests administered included the Phonological Assessment Battery, postural stability, bead threading, finger to thumb and time estimation...
  54. ncbi request reprint The weak coherence account: detail-focused cognitive style in autism spectrum disorders
    Francesca Happe
    Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, UK
    J Autism Dev Disord 36:5-25. 2006
    ..Local bias appears not to be a mere side-effect of executive dysfunction, and may be independent of theory of mind deficits. Possible computational and neural models are discussed...
  55. pmc Forty years on: Uta Frith's contribution to research on autism and dyslexia, 1966-2006
    Dorothy V M Bishop
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 61:16-26. 2008
    ..In this enterprise she has encouraged psychologists to work in a theoretical framework that distinguishes between observed behaviour and the underlying cognitive and neurobiological processes that mediate that behaviour...
  56. ncbi request reprint Can autistic children predict behavior by social stereotypes?
    Lawrence Hirschfeld
    Curr Biol 17:R451-2. 2007
  57. ncbi request reprint Imitation and action understanding in autistic spectrum disorders: how valid is the hypothesis of a deficit in the mirror neuron system?
    Antonia F de C Hamilton
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, USA
    Neuropsychologia 45:1859-68. 2007
    ....
  58. ncbi request reprint More than words: a common neural basis for reading and naming deficits in developmental dyslexia?
    Eamon J McCrory
    Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, U
    Brain 128:261-7. 2005
    ..Our investigation points to a common neurological basis for deficits in word reading and picture naming in developmental dyslexia...
  59. ncbi request reprint Autism spectrum disorder and psychopathy: shared cognitive underpinnings or double hit?
    John Rogers
    Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, UK
    Psychol Med 36:1789-98. 2006
    ....
  60. ncbi request reprint Where does your own action influence your perception of another person's action in the brain?
    Antonia F de C Hamilton
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, 6162 Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    Neuroimage 29:524-35. 2006
    ....
  61. ncbi request reprint Do readers with autism make bridging inferences from world knowledge?
    David Saldana
    Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, University of Seville, 41018 Seville, Spain
    J Exp Child Psychol 96:310-9. 2007
    ..Instead, we suggest that these problems must be sought at a higher level of text processing...