Chris D Frith

Summary

Affiliation: University College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Predictive coding: an account of the mirror neuron system
    James M Kilner
    The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, WC1N 3BG, London, UK
    Cogn Process 8:159-66. 2007
  2. pmc The psychology of volition
    Chris Frith
    Interacting Minds Centre, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
    Exp Brain Res 229:289-99. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Explaining delusions of control: the comparator model 20 years on
    Chris Frith
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London, UK
    Conscious Cogn 21:52-4. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Interacting minds--a biological basis
    C D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Science 286:1692-5. 1999
  5. pmc The role of social cognition in decision making
    Chris D Frith
    Center for Functional Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, Building 30, 8000 Arhus C, Denmark
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:3875-86. 2008
  6. pmc Social cognition
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:2033-9. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Explaining the symptoms of schizophrenia: abnormalities in the awareness of action
    C D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology and Sobell Department of Physiology, Institute of Neurology, University College, 12 Queen Square, London, UK
    Brain Res Brain Res Rev 31:357-63. 2000
  8. doi request reprint The self and its reputation in autism
    Chris D Frith
    Center for Functional Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, Building 30, 8000 Arhus C, Denmark
    Neuron 57:331-2. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Social cognition in humans
    Chris D Frith
    Welcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London, UK
    Curr Biol 17:R724-32. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Comments on Shaun Gallagher: neurocognitive models of schizophrenia: a neurophenomenological critique
    Chris Frith
    Functional Imaging Laboratory, Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK
    Psychopathology 37:20-2. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications108 found, 100 shown here

  1. pmc Predictive coding: an account of the mirror neuron system
    James M Kilner
    The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, WC1N 3BG, London, UK
    Cogn Process 8:159-66. 2007
    ..This account identifies a precise role for the mirror system in our ability to infer intentions from actions and provides the outline of the underlying computational mechanisms...
  2. pmc The psychology of volition
    Chris Frith
    Interacting Minds Centre, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
    Exp Brain Res 229:289-99. 2013
    ..As a result, agency, regret and responsibility are cultural phenomena that are unique to humans. ..
  3. doi request reprint Explaining delusions of control: the comparator model 20 years on
    Chris Frith
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London, UK
    Conscious Cogn 21:52-4. 2012
    ..However, we will still need to explain why symptoms can be so variable and we still do not understand the origin of the most mysterious symptom of all: thought insertion...
  4. ncbi request reprint Interacting minds--a biological basis
    C D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Science 286:1692-5. 1999
    ..These observations suggest that the ability to mentalize has evolved from a system for representing actions...
  5. pmc The role of social cognition in decision making
    Chris D Frith
    Center for Functional Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, Building 30, 8000 Arhus C, Denmark
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:3875-86. 2008
    ..In these cases, social motivations and emotions compete with each other, while higher-level control processes modulate the interactions of these low-level biases...
  6. pmc Social cognition
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:2033-9. 2008
    ..I speculate that it is this ability to recognize and learn from instructions rather than mere observation which permitted that advanced ability to benefit from cultural learning that seems to be unique to the human race...
  7. ncbi request reprint Explaining the symptoms of schizophrenia: abnormalities in the awareness of action
    C D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology and Sobell Department of Physiology, Institute of Neurology, University College, 12 Queen Square, London, UK
    Brain Res Brain Res Rev 31:357-63. 2000
    ..The lack of attenuation may arise from long range cortico-cortical disconnections which prevent inhibitory signals arising in the frontal areas which generate motor commands from reaching the appropriate sensory areas...
  8. doi request reprint The self and its reputation in autism
    Chris D Frith
    Center for Functional Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, Building 30, 8000 Arhus C, Denmark
    Neuron 57:331-2. 2008
    ..We speculate that this may arise because autistic individuals are unaware that they will also gain or lose reputation in their partner's eyes...
  9. ncbi request reprint Social cognition in humans
    Chris D Frith
    Welcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London, UK
    Curr Biol 17:R724-32. 2007
    ..We speculate that the development of these high level social signalling systems goes hand in hand with the development of consciousness...
  10. ncbi request reprint Comments on Shaun Gallagher: neurocognitive models of schizophrenia: a neurophenomenological critique
    Chris Frith
    Functional Imaging Laboratory, Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK
    Psychopathology 37:20-2. 2004
  11. pmc Abnormalities in the awareness and control of action
    C D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 355:1771-88. 2000
    ....
  12. pmc The social brain?
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:671-8. 2007
    ..These cognitive processes are not specifically social, since they can be applied in other domains. However, these cognitive processes have been driven to ever higher levels of sophistication by the complexities of social interaction...
  13. ncbi request reprint How we predict what other people are going to do
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Brain Res 1079:36-46. 2006
    ..In this way, they provide an escape from the tyranny of strong emotions that are readily aroused in social interactions...
  14. ncbi request reprint The self in action: lessons from delusions of control
    Chris Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, UK
    Conscious Cogn 14:752-70. 2005
    ..We know that we are agents and that we are successfully causing the world to change. But as actors we move through the world like shadows glimpsed only occasional from the corner of an eye...
  15. ncbi request reprint Is autism a disconnection disorder?
    Chris Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK
    Lancet Neurol 3:577. 2004
  16. ncbi request reprint Attention to action and awareness of other minds
    Chris Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Conscious Cogn 11:481-7. 2002
    ..This common system enables us to communicate mental states and thereby share our experiences...
  17. pmc Neural correlates of observing pretend play in which one object is represented as another
    Charles Whitehead
    Wellcome Centre for Neuroimaging at UCL, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N3BG, UK
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 4:369-78. 2009
    ..However, this leaves open the question as to whether pretence or mentalizing is the more basic process...
  18. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of hallucinations and delusions
    Chris Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    C R Biol 328:169-75. 2005
    ..Further research is needed to explore the precise involvement of long-range connections in the mechanisms of forward modelling...
  19. pmc Role of facial expressions in social interactions
    Chris Frith
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at UCL, Centre of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:3453-8. 2009
    ..These gestures indicate, first, that the sender is to be trusted and, second, that any following signals are of importance to the receiver...
  20. ncbi request reprint Images of psychopathology
    C Frith
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, University College London, UK
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 8:259-62. 1998
    ..It is becoming increasingly evident that a lesion model is inappropriate and that a more relevant characterisation will be found in terms of disorders of functional interconnections between brain regions...
  21. ncbi request reprint In for a penny, in for a pound: methylphenidate reduces the inhibitory effect of high stakes on persistent risky choice
    Daniel Campbell-Meiklejohn
    Centre of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark
    J Neurosci 32:13032-8. 2012
    ..Trait reward responsiveness also reduced the impact of high stakes. The findings suggest that elevated catecholamine activity by MPH can disrupt inhibitory influences on persistent risky choice in healthy adults...
  22. pmc Distinct roles for lateral and medial rostral prefrontal cortex in source monitoring of perceived and imagined events
    Martha S Turner
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychology, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Neuropsychologia 46:1442-53. 2008
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Discriminating imagined from perceived information engages brain areas implicated in schizophrenia
    Jon S Simons
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychology, University College London, UK
    Neuroimage 32:696-703. 2006
    ..These results indicate a possible link between the brain areas implicated in schizophrenia and the regions supporting the ability to discriminate between perceived and imagined information...
  24. ncbi request reprint Comment on "Wandering minds: the default network and stimulus-independent thought"
    Sam J Gilbert
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychology, University College London, London, UK
    Science 317:43; author reply 43. 2007
    ..g., watchfulness). Consideration of both possibilities is required to resolve this ambiguity...
  25. ncbi request reprint The mirror-neuron system: a Bayesian perspective
    James M Kilner
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL, London, UK
    Neuroreport 18:619-23. 2007
    ..This account identifies a precise role for the mirror-neuron system in our ability to infer intentions from observed movement and outlines possible computational mechanisms...
  26. pmc Evidence of mirror neurons in human inferior frontal gyrus
    James M Kilner
    The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, UCL, London, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 29:10153-9. 2009
    ..This pattern of responses is consistent with that predicted by mirror neurons and is evidence of mirror neurons in the human IFG...
  27. ncbi request reprint Brain responses to the acquired moral status of faces
    Tania Singer
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College of London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Neuron 41:653-62. 2004
    ..Our data indicate that rapid learning regarding the moral status of others is expressed in altered neural activity within a system associated with social cognition...
  28. pmc Subliminal instrumental conditioning demonstrated in the human brain
    Mathias Pessiglione
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N3BG, UK
    Neuron 59:561-7. 2008
    ..We conclude that, even without conscious processing of contextual cues, our brain can learn their reward value and use them to provide a bias on decision making...
  29. pmc Dopamine-dependent prediction errors underpin reward-seeking behaviour in humans
    Mathias Pessiglione
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Nature 442:1042-5. 2006
    ..We conclude that dopamine-dependent modulation of striatal activity can account for how the human brain uses reward prediction errors to improve future decisions...
  30. pmc Empathic neural responses are modulated by the perceived fairness of others
    Tania Singer
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, University College of London, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Nature 439:466-9. 2006
    ....
  31. doi request reprint Dopaminergic modulation of striato-frontal connectivity during motor timing in Parkinson's disease
    Marjan Jahanshahi
    Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK
    Brain 133:727-45. 2010
    ..In contrast, our results establish for the first time that administration of dopaminergic medication increases striatal-frontal connectivity between the caudate nucleus and prefrontal cortex during motor timing...
  32. ncbi request reprint The neural consequences of conflict between intention and the senses
    G R Fink
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Brain 122:497-512. 1999
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint Inattentional blindness versus inattentional amnesia for fixated but ignored words
    G Rees
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Science 286:2504-7. 1999
    ..These results demonstrate true inattentional blindness for words and show that visual recognition wholly depends on attention even for highly familiar and meaningful stimuli at the center of gaze...
  34. pmc The role of metacognition in human social interactions
    Chris D Frith
    University College London, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:2213-23. 2012
    ..I suggest, therefore, that explicit metacognition is a uniquely human ability that has evolved through its enhancement of collaborative decision-making...
  35. pmc Modulation of social influence by methylphenidate
    Daniel K Campbell-Meiklejohn
    Center for Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
    Neuropsychopharmacology 37:1517-25. 2012
    ..We provide a new working hypothesis of a neurocognitive mechanism by which MPH reduces socially disruptive behavior. We also provide novel evidence of catecholamine mediation of social learning [corrected]...
  36. doi request reprint Mechanisms of social cognition
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Trust Center for Neuroimaging, London, UK
    Annu Rev Psychol 63:287-313. 2012
    ..We suggest that they also underlie the ability to explicitly share experiences with other agents, as in reflective discussion and teaching. These are key in increasing the accuracy of the models of the world that we construct...
  37. pmc The Kuleshov Effect: the influence of contextual framing on emotional attributions
    Dean Mobbs
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Functional Imaging Laboratory, University College London, London, UK
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 1:95-106. 2006
    ..These prefrontal regions may act to guide appropriate choices across altering contexts. Together, these findings offer a neurobiological basis for contextual framing effects on social attributions...
  38. ncbi request reprint Activation in posterior superior temporal sulcus parallels parameter inducing the percept of animacy
    Johannes Schultz
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Neuron 45:625-35. 2005
    ....
  39. ncbi request reprint Evidence for sensory prediction deficits in schizophrenia
    Sukhwinder S Shergill
    Institute of Neurology, University College London
    Am J Psychiatry 162:2384-6. 2005
    ..The authors test the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia have defects in their ability to predict the sensory consequences of their actions...
  40. ncbi request reprint Differential components of prospective memory? Evidence from fMRI
    Jon S Simons
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Department of Psychology, University College London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 44:1388-97. 2006
    ..Together, the results suggest that whilst cue identification and intention retrieval may be behaviorally separable, they share at least some common neural basis in anterior prefrontal cortex...
  41. pmc How humans integrate the prospects of pain and reward during choice
    Deborah Talmi
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London UCL, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 29:14617-26. 2009
    ....
  42. ncbi request reprint Serotoninergic effects on judgments and social learning of trustworthiness
    Arndis Simonsen
    Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University, 8000, Aarhus, Denmark
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 231:2759-69. 2014
    ..This effect may manifest socially as reduced apparent trustworthiness of others. Trustworthiness judgments can emerge from either direct observation or references provided by third parties...
  43. ncbi request reprint Activation of the human superior temporal gyrus during observation of goal attribution by intentional objects
    Johannes Schultz
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, London, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 16:1695-705. 2004
    ..These data implicate the superior temporal gyrus in the identification of objects displaying complex goal-directed motion...
  44. ncbi request reprint Attentional effects of noradrenaline vary with arousal level: selective activation of thalamic pulvinar in humans
    Jennifer T Coull
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Neuroimage 22:315-22. 2004
    ..Therefore, for the same level of sedation, the behavioural and anatomical attributes identifying the quality of sedation can vary...
  45. pmc Optimally interacting minds
    Bahador Bahrami
    University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Science 329:1081-5. 2010
    ..These seemingly discrepant patterns of group behavior can be explained by a model in which two heads are Bayes optimal under the assumption that individuals accurately communicate their level of confidence on every trial...
  46. doi request reprint Follow you, follow me: continuous mutual prediction and adaptation in joint tapping
    Ivana Konvalinka
    Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital Aårhus Sygehus, University of Aarhus, Nørrebrogade 44, Aarhus, Denmark
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 63:2220-30. 2010
    ..We thus propose that interpersonal coordination is facilitated by the mutual abilities to (a) predict the other's subsequent action and (b) adapt accordingly on a millisecond timescale...
  47. doi request reprint Action observation: inferring intentions without mirror neurons
    James M Kilner
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, UCL, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Curr Biol 18:R32-3. 2008
    ..A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand...
  48. ncbi request reprint Neural correlates of change detection and change blindness
    D M Beck
    Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Neurosci 4:645-50. 2001
    ....
  49. pmc Does interaction matter? Testing whether a confidence heuristic can replace interaction in collective decision-making
    Dan Bang
    Interacting Minds Centre, Aarhus University, Jens Chr Skous vej 4, Building 1483, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD, United Kingdom Calleva Research Centre for Evolution and Human Sciences, Magdalen College, High Street, Oxford OX1 4AU, United Kingdom Electronic address
    Conscious Cogn 26:13-23. 2014
    ..Interaction allows individuals to alleviate, but not fully resolve, differences in the reliability of their judgements. We discuss the implications of these findings for models of confidence and collective decision-making. ..
  50. pmc Structure of orbitofrontal cortex predicts social influence
    Daniel K Campbell-Meiklejohn
    Center for Neural Science, New York University, 4 Washington Place, NY 10003, USA Danish Neuroscience Centre, Aarhus University, Nørrebrogade 44, 10 G, Arhus Universitetshospital, Arhus Sygehus, Aarhus, Denmark
    Curr Biol 22:R123-4. 2012
    ..These findings indicate that the tendency to conform one's values to those expressed by other people has an anatomical correlate in the human brain...
  51. pmc Modulation of the mirror system by social relevance
    James M Kilner
    The Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 1:143-8. 2006
    ..We suggest that this modulation reflects a mechanism that filters information into the 'mirror system', allowing only socially relevant information to pass...
  52. pmc Relationship between activity in human primary motor cortex during action observation and the mirror neuron system
    James M Kilner
    The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 4:e4925. 2009
    ..These results are discussed in terms of the firing patterns of mirror neurons in F5 which have been reported to have similar properties...
  53. doi request reprint Implicit and explicit processes in social cognition
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, WC1N 3AR UK
    Neuron 60:503-10. 2008
    ..On the other hand, higher-level conscious processes are as likely to be selfish as prosocial...
  54. ncbi request reprint The role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: evidence from the effects of contextual constraint in a sentence completion task
    D A Nathaniel-James
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Neuroimage 16:1094-1102. 2002
    ..This function resembles the biasing of competition between stimuli in the model of Desimone and Duncan and is analogous to the component of the Supervisory Attentional System that modulates the contention scheduling system...
  55. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of mentalizing
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Neuron 50:531-4. 2006
    ..Finally, the human brain has the unique ability to represent the mental states of the self and the other and the relationship between these mental states, making possible the communication of ideas...
  56. doi request reprint Social cognition: hi there! here's something interesting
    Chris D Frith
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Curr Biol 18:R524-5. 2008
    ..A new study of gaze following shows that human infants are highly sensitive to the communicative intent of the person they are interacting with...
  57. pmc Dysconnection in schizophrenia: from abnormal synaptic plasticity to failures of self-monitoring
    Klaas E Stephan
    Schizophr Bull 35:509-27. 2009
    ..Finally, we test the explanatory power of our theory against a list of empirical facts about schizophrenia...
  58. ncbi request reprint Multimodal spatial representations engaged in human parietal cortex during both saccadic and manual spatial orienting
    Emiliano Macaluso
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Street, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 13:990-9. 2003
    ..Here we crossed sensory stimulation of different modalities (vision or touch, in left or right hemifield) with spatially directed responses to such stimulation by different effector-systems (saccadic or manual)...
  59. ncbi request reprint Noradrenergically mediated plasticity in a human attentional neuronal network
    J T Coull
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Neuroimage 10:705-15. 1999
    ..More generally, the results illustrate the dynamic plasticity of cognitive brain systems following neurochemical challenge...
  60. ncbi request reprint Recoding, storage, rehearsal and grouping in verbal short-term memory: an fMRI study
    R N Henson
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 38:426-40. 2000
    ....
  61. ncbi request reprint Orienting attention in time: behavioural and neuroanatomical distinction between exogenous and endogenous shifts
    J T Coull
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 38:808-19. 2000
    ..These findings suggest that distinct brain areas are involved in redirecting attention based upon sensory events (bottom-up, exogenous shifts) and based upon cognitive expectations (top-down, endogenous shifts)...
  62. ncbi request reprint Spatio-temporal prediction modulates the perception of self-produced stimuli
    S J Blakemore
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 11:551-9. 1999
    ..e., its tickliness) is proportional to the error between the sensory feedback predicted by an internal forward model of the motor system and the actual sensory feedback produced by the movement...
  63. ncbi request reprint The functional neuroanatomy of comprehension and memory: the importance of prior knowledge
    E A Maguire
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, UK
    Brain 122:1839-50. 1999
    ..Knowledge of how distinct brain regions contribute differentially to aspects of comprehension and memory has implications for understanding how these processes break down in conditions of brain injury or disease...
  64. pmc Navigation-related structural change in the hippocampi of taxi drivers
    E A Maguire
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:4398-403. 2000
    ..It seems that there is a capacity for local plastic change in the structure of the healthy adult human brain in response to environmental demands...
  65. pmc Hemispheric specialization for global and local processing: the effect of stimulus category
    G R Fink
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 264:487-94. 1997
    ..The results suggest that the relative differential hemispheric activations in the prestriate areas during global and local processing are modified by stimulus category...
  66. ncbi request reprint Dissociating neuromodulatory effects of diazepam on episodic memory encoding and executive function
    J T Coull
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 145:213-22. 1999
    ..Deficits in tests of executive function are also reported. In this study, we ask whether the latter effects are secondary to mnemonic impairment, or reflect specific and distinct effects of benzodiazepines on executive function...
  67. ncbi request reprint Differential neural response to positive and negative feedback in planning and guessing tasks
    R Elliott
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, U K
    Neuropsychologia 35:1395-404. 1997
    ....
  68. ncbi request reprint Modulating irrelevant motion perception by varying attentional load in an unrelated task
    G Rees
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Science 278:1616-9. 1997
    ..These findings fulfill the prediction that perception of irrelevant distractors depends on the relevant processing load...
  69. ncbi request reprint Knowing where things are parahippocampal involvement in encoding object locations in virtual large-scale space
    E A Maguire
    Wellcome Institute of Neurology, Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK, WC1N 3BG
    J Cogn Neurosci 10:61-76. 1998
    ....
  70. ncbi request reprint Knowing where and getting there: a human navigation network
    E A Maguire
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Science 280:921-4. 1998
    ..These findings outline a network of brain areas that support navigation in humans and link the functions of these regions to physiological observations in other mammals...
  71. ncbi request reprint The functional roles of prefrontal cortex in episodic memory. II. Retrieval
    P C Fletcher
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Brain 121:1249-56. 1998
    ..The results provide evidence for functional specialization of the right prefrontal cortex for discrete cognitive processes during episodic memory retrieval...
  72. ncbi request reprint The functional anatomy of attention to visual motion. A functional MRI study
    C Buchel
    The Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Brain 121:1281-94. 1998
    ..Given the similarity of our attentional network to that controlling eye movements, the results of this study are in accord with theories linking oculomotor control and attention...
  73. ncbi request reprint How do we predict the consequences of our actions? A functional imaging study
    S J Blakemore
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London
    Neuropsychologia 36:521-9. 1998
    ..These observations support theoretical approaches to cognition that postulate the existence of a self-monitoring system...
  74. ncbi request reprint Differential activation of right superior parietal cortex and intraparietal sulcus by spatial and nonspatial attention
    J T Coull
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Neuroimage 8:176-87. 1998
    ..Finally, PPC activations in spatial WM tasks are likely to be due to a combination of spatial perception, attention, and WM, rather than to any of these individually...
  75. pmc How do we select perceptions and actions? Human brain imaging studies
    G Rees
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 353:1283-93. 1998
    ..Evidence from behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of ignored visual motion processing is presented in support of this proposal...
  76. ncbi request reprint Learning to find your way: a role for the human hippocampal formation
    E A Maguire
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, U K
    Proc Biol Sci 263:1745-50. 1996
    ..Our results shed light on the neural basis of the human representation of large-scale space pinpointing a particular role for the human hippocampal formation in learning to find one's way...
  77. ncbi request reprint Monitoring for target objects: activation of right frontal and parietal cortices with increasing time on task
    J T Coull
    Wellcome Dept of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 36:1325-34. 1998
    ....
  78. ncbi request reprint Central cancellation of self-produced tickle sensation
    S J Blakemore
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK
    Nat Neurosci 1:635-40. 1998
    ..This difference suggests that the cerebellum is involved in predicting the specific sensory consequences of movements, providing the signal that is used to cancel the sensory response to self-generated stimulation...
  79. pmc How does the brain sustain a visual percept?
    C M Portas
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 267:845-50. 2000
    ..This observation suggests that sustaining a visual percept involves neuroanatomical systems which are implicated in memory function and which are distinct from those engaged during perceptual synthesis...
  80. ncbi request reprint Brain regions involved in prospective memory as determined by positron emission tomography
    P W Burgess
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, WC1N 3AR, London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 39:545-55. 2001
    ..It is argued that the first set of region play a role in the maintenance of an intention, with the second set involved additionally in its realisation...
  81. ncbi request reprint Inferring false beliefs from the actions of oneself and others: an fMRI study
    J Grezes
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Neuroimage 21:744-50. 2004
    ..We suggest that this reflects a mismatch between the perceived action and the predicted action's outcomes derived from simulation...
  82. ncbi request reprint Delusions of alien control in the normal brain
    S J Blakemore
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Neuropsychologia 41:1058-67. 2003
    ..These results have implications for the brain mechanisms underlying delusions of control, which may be associated with overactivation of the cerebellar-parietal network...
  83. ncbi request reprint Preparatory states in crossmodal spatial attention: spatial specificity and possible control mechanisms
    E Macaluso
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Exp Brain Res 149:62-74. 2003
    ....
  84. ncbi request reprint Crossmodal spatial influences of touch on extrastriate visual areas take current gaze direction into account
    E Macaluso
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, United Kingdom
    Neuron 34:647-58. 2002
    ..This indicates that crossmodal influences of touch upon visual cortex depend on spatial alignment for the multimodal stimuli, with gaze posture taken into account...
  85. ncbi request reprint Supramodal effects of covert spatial orienting triggered by visual or tactile events
    Emiliano Macaluso
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 14:389-401. 2002
    ....
  86. ncbi request reprint Directing attention to locations and to sensory modalities: multiple levels of selective processing revealed with PET
    E Macaluso
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK
    Cereb Cortex 12:357-68. 2002
    ..These jointly contribute to boost processing of stimuli at the attended location in the relevant modality...
  87. ncbi request reprint Reward value of attractiveness and gaze
    K K Kampe
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Nature 413:589. 2001
    ..Depending on the direction of gaze, attractiveness can thus activate dopaminergic regions that are strongly linked to reward prediction, indicating that central reward systems may be engaged during the initiation of social interactions...
  88. ncbi request reprint Multimodal mechanisms of attention related to rates of spatial shifting in vision and touch
    E Macaluso
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK
    Exp Brain Res 137:445-54. 2001
    ..They also suggest that anterior and posterior regions of the spatial-attention network play different roles in attention shifting...
  89. ncbi request reprint Distinct neural systems for the encoding and recognition of topography and faces
    E A Maguire
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Neuroimage 13:743-50. 2001
    ....
  90. ncbi request reprint Modulation of human visual cortex by crossmodal spatial attention
    E Macaluso
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, UK Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
    Science 289:1206-8. 2000
    ..This provides a neural explanation for crossmodal links in spatial attention...
  91. ncbi request reprint The noradrenergic alpha2 agonist clonidine modulates behavioural and neuroanatomical correlates of human attentional orienting and alerting
    J T Coull
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Cereb Cortex 11:73-84. 2001
    ..Furthermore, we have demonstrated lateralized neuroanatomical substrates for the noradrenergic modulation of human attentional orienting in the spatial and temporal domains...
  92. ncbi request reprint The role of working memory in visual selective attention
    J W de Fockert
    Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Science 291:1803-6. 2001
    ..These findings confirm a major role for working memory in the control of visual selective attention...
  93. ncbi request reprint Auditory processing across the sleep-wake cycle: simultaneous EEG and fMRI monitoring in humans
    C M Portas
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, United Kingdom
    Neuron 28:991-9. 2000
    ..These data suggests that the sleeping brain can process auditory stimuli and detect meaningful events...
  94. pmc How the opinion of others affects our valuation of objects
    Daniel K Campbell-Meiklejohn
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Curr Biol 20:1165-70. 2010
    ..Influence at such a low level could contribute to rapid learning and the swift spread of values throughout a population...
  95. ncbi request reprint Empathy for pain involves the affective but not sensory components of pain
    Tania Singer
    Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College of London, 12 Queen Square, WC1N 3AR London, UK
    Science 303:1157-62. 2004
    ..We conclude that only that part of the pain network associated with its affective qualities, but not its sensory qualities, mediates empathy...
  96. pmc How the brain translates money into force: a neuroimaging study of subliminal motivation
    Mathias Pessiglione
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Science 316:904-6. 2007
    ..Our findings thus reveal this region as a key node in brain circuitry that enables expected rewards to energize behavior, without the need for the subjects;awareness...
  97. pmc Brain response to a humanoid robot in areas implicated in the perception of human emotional gestures
    Thierry Chaminade
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e11577. 2010
    ..We can read the emotions depicted in its gestures, yet might utilize different neural processes than those used for reading the emotions in human agents...
  98. doi request reprint Detecting deception: the scope and limits
    Kamila E Sip
    Center for Functional Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, Building 30, DK 8000 Arhus C, Denmark
    Trends Cogn Sci 12:48-53. 2008
    ..The problems that bedevilled the old technology have not been eliminated by the new. Advances will only be possible if experiments are designed that take account of the intentions of the subject and the context in which these occur...
  99. pmc Kinematic cues in perceptual weight judgement and their origins in box lifting
    A F de C Hamilton
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK
    Psychol Res 71:13-21. 2007
    ..The differences between perceptual and motor behaviour are evidence against a strong version of the motor simulation hypothesis...
  100. ncbi request reprint Activity in prefrontal cortex, not hippocampus, varies parametrically with the increasing remoteness of memories
    E A Maguire
    Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, University College London, UK
    Neuroreport 12:441-4. 2001
    ..These findings are concordant with a view of hippocampal involvement in autobiographical memory retrieval throughout the lifetime...