V French

Summary

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Pattern formation in colour on butterfly wings
    V French
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratory, UK
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 7:524-9. 1997
  2. ncbi request reprint Pattern formation: a focus on notch in butterfly eyespots
    Vernon French
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Curr Biol 14:R663-5. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Insect segmentation: Genes, stripes and segments in "Hoppers"
    V French
    ICAPB, Ashworth Laboratory, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Curr Biol 11:R910-3. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Insect wings. Patterns upon patterns
    G North
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Curr Biol 4:611-4. 1994
  5. ncbi request reprint Pattern formation. The beginning and the end of insect limbs
    V French
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Curr Biol 4:34-7. 1994
  6. ncbi request reprint Evolution: have wings come, gone and come again?
    Graham Stone
    ICAPB, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratory, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Curr Biol 13:R436-8. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Developmental and genetic mechanisms for evolutionary diversification of serial repeats: eyespot size in Bicyclus anynana butterflies
    Patricia Beldade
    Institute of Biology, University of Leiden, Kaisertraat 63, 2311 GP Leiden, The Netherlands
    J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol 310:191-201. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary developmental biology: how and why to spot fly wings
    Paul M Brakefield
    Nature 433:466-7. 2005
  9. pmc Conserved developmental processes and the formation of evolutionary novelties: examples from butterfly wings
    Suzanne V Saenko
    Institute of Biology, Leiden University, Kaiserstraat 63, 2311 GP Leiden, The Netherlands
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:1549-55. 2008

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi request reprint Pattern formation in colour on butterfly wings
    V French
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratory, UK
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 7:524-9. 1997
    ..Many loci are known (e.g. in Heliconius) that have major effects on the colour pattern and these invite molecular analysis...
  2. ncbi request reprint Pattern formation: a focus on notch in butterfly eyespots
    Vernon French
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Curr Biol 14:R663-5. 2004
    ..New observations of early and dynamic expression of Notch in developing lepidopteran wings suggests that this signalling pathway may function in defining the central focus that will specify the butterfly eyespot colour pattern...
  3. ncbi request reprint Insect segmentation: Genes, stripes and segments in "Hoppers"
    V French
    ICAPB, Ashworth Laboratory, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Curr Biol 11:R910-3. 2001
    ..This suggests that, despite great differences between the embryos, a hierarchy of gap/pair-rule/segment polarity gene function may be a shared and ancestral feature of insect segmentation...
  4. ncbi request reprint Insect wings. Patterns upon patterns
    G North
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Curr Biol 4:611-4. 1994
    ..Butterfly wing patterns may be generated by an extra coordinate system superimposed on a basic wing-patterning system similar to that of the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster...
  5. ncbi request reprint Pattern formation. The beginning and the end of insect limbs
    V French
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK
    Curr Biol 4:34-7. 1994
    ..Recent results shed light on the mechanisms underlying pattern formation in the development of Drosophila imaginal discs, which give rise to the appendages of the adult fly...
  6. ncbi request reprint Evolution: have wings come, gone and come again?
    Graham Stone
    ICAPB, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratory, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Curr Biol 13:R436-8. 2003
    ..Can complex traits be re-evolved by lineages that have lost them? Phylogenetic study now suggests that wings may indeed have reappeared several times within the ancestrally wingless stick insects...
  7. ncbi request reprint Developmental and genetic mechanisms for evolutionary diversification of serial repeats: eyespot size in Bicyclus anynana butterflies
    Patricia Beldade
    Institute of Biology, University of Leiden, Kaisertraat 63, 2311 GP Leiden, The Netherlands
    J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol 310:191-201. 2008
    ..We also report on the phenotypic analysis of a number of mutant stocks demonstrating how single alleles can affect different eyespots in concert or independently, and thus contribute to the individualization of serially repeated traits...
  8. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary developmental biology: how and why to spot fly wings
    Paul M Brakefield
    Nature 433:466-7. 2005
  9. pmc Conserved developmental processes and the formation of evolutionary novelties: examples from butterfly wings
    Suzanne V Saenko
    Institute of Biology, Leiden University, Kaiserstraat 63, 2311 GP Leiden, The Netherlands
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:1549-55. 2008
    ....