A H Fitter

Summary

Affiliation: University of York
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Ecology. Making allelopathy respectable
    Alastair Fitter
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Science 301:1337-8. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Common ground
    Alastair Fitter
    Department of Biology, University of York, UK
    Curr Biol 15:R185-7. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Rapid changes in flowering time in British plants
    A H Fitter
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK
    Science 296:1689-91. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint Co-existing grass species have distinctive arbuscular mycorrhizal communities
    P Vandenkoornhuyse
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Mol Ecol 12:3085-95. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Respiration of the external mycelium in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis shows strong dependence on recent photosynthates and acclimation to temperature
    A Heinemeyer
    Centre for Terrestrial Carbon Dynamics CTCD York, Stockholm Environment Institute SEI York Centre, Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5DD, UK
    New Phytol 171:159-70. 2006
  6. doi request reprint Molecular diversity of Frankia in root nodules of Alnus incana grown with inoculum from polluted urban soils
    K P Ridgway
    Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 50:255-63. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Ribosomal small subunit sequence variation within spores of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Scutellospora sp
    J P Clapp
    Department of Biology, University of York, UK
    Mol Ecol 8:915-21. 1999
  8. ncbi request reprint An arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus accelerates decomposition and acquires nitrogen directly from organic material
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York, YO10 5YW, UK
    Nature 413:297-9. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Arbuscular mycorrhizal community composition associated with two plant species in a grassland ecosystem
    P Vandenkoornhuyse
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, YO10 5YW, UK
    Mol Ecol 11:1555-64. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Impact of temperature on the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis: growth responses of the host plant and its AM fungal partner
    A Heinemeyer
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    J Exp Bot 55:525-34. 2004

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. ncbi request reprint Ecology. Making allelopathy respectable
    Alastair Fitter
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Science 301:1337-8. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Common ground
    Alastair Fitter
    Department of Biology, University of York, UK
    Curr Biol 15:R185-7. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Rapid changes in flowering time in British plants
    A H Fitter
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK
    Science 296:1689-91. 2002
    ..Annuals are more likely to flower early than congeneric perennials, and insect-pollinated species more than wind-pollinated ones...
  4. ncbi request reprint Co-existing grass species have distinctive arbuscular mycorrhizal communities
    P Vandenkoornhuyse
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Mol Ecol 12:3085-95. 2003
    ..Conversely, in plots where insecticide was applied, we found higher AM fungal diversity and, in F. rubra roots, a statistically different AM fungal community...
  5. ncbi request reprint Respiration of the external mycelium in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis shows strong dependence on recent photosynthates and acclimation to temperature
    A Heinemeyer
    Centre for Terrestrial Carbon Dynamics CTCD York, Stockholm Environment Institute SEI York Centre, Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5DD, UK
    New Phytol 171:159-70. 2006
    ..The results indicate a fast ERM acclimation to temperature, and that light is the key factor controlling carbon allocation to the fungus...
  6. doi request reprint Molecular diversity of Frankia in root nodules of Alnus incana grown with inoculum from polluted urban soils
    K P Ridgway
    Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 50:255-63. 2004
    ..Inoculation with site-adapted Frankia under greenhouse conditions could thus be an appropriate strategy to increase the symbiotic capacity of A. incana and to improve its chances of survival and growth when planted on polluted soils...
  7. ncbi request reprint Ribosomal small subunit sequence variation within spores of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Scutellospora sp
    J P Clapp
    Department of Biology, University of York, UK
    Mol Ecol 8:915-21. 1999
    ..In addition to glomalean sequences, a number of different sequences, apparently from ascomycetes, were obtained from both root and spore samples...
  8. ncbi request reprint An arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus accelerates decomposition and acquires nitrogen directly from organic material
    A Hodge
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York, YO10 5YW, UK
    Nature 413:297-9. 2001
    ..Hyphal growth of the fungal partner was increased in the presence of the organic material, independently of the host plant...
  9. ncbi request reprint Arbuscular mycorrhizal community composition associated with two plant species in a grassland ecosystem
    P Vandenkoornhuyse
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, YO10 5YW, UK
    Mol Ecol 11:1555-64. 2002
    ..repens differed from that colonizing A. capillaris, providing evidence for AM fungal host preference. In addition, our results reveal dynamic changes in the AM fungal community through time...
  10. ncbi request reprint Impact of temperature on the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis: growth responses of the host plant and its AM fungal partner
    A Heinemeyer
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    J Exp Bot 55:525-34. 2004
    ..These temperature responses have implications for modelling carbon dynamics under global climate change...
  11. pmc Root system architecture determines fitness in an Arabidopsis mutant in competition for immobile phosphate ions but not for nitrate ions
    Alastair Fitter
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:2017-22. 2002
    ..These results confirm model predictions and have implications both for the evolution of complex root systems and for the design of efficient root systems for crops...
  12. pmc Phosphate availability regulates root system architecture in Arabidopsis
    L C Williamson
    Department of Biology, University of York, Box 373, York YO10 5YW, United Kingdom
    Plant Physiol 126:875-82. 2001
    ..In contrast, shoot phosphate status was found to influence the root system architecture response to phosphate availability...
  13. doi request reprint Growth, respiration and nutrient acquisition by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae and its host plant Plantago lanceolata in cooled soil
    T Karasawa
    Department of Biology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK
    Plant Cell Environ 35:819-28. 2012
    ..lanceolata, and so enhanced plant P content under a realistic degree of soil cooling that reduced plant growth. AM fungi may therefore be an effective means to promote plant nutrition under low soil temperatures...
  14. ncbi request reprint The role of root system architecture and root hairs in promoting anchorage against uprooting forces in Allium cepa and root mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana
    Peter H J Bailey
    Department of Biology, University of York, PO Box 373, York YO10 5YW, UK
    J Exp Bot 53:333-40. 2002
    ..The results show that lateral roots play an important role in anchorage, and that co-operation between roots may be the most significant factor...