G Finlayson

Summary

Affiliation: University of Leeds
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Susceptibility to weight gain. Eating behaviour traits and physical activity as predictors of weight gain during the first year of university
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
    Appetite 58:1091-8. 2012
  2. doi request reprint Implicit wanting and explicit liking are markers for trait binge eating. A susceptible phenotype for overeating
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Appetite 57:722-8. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Current progress in the assessment of 'liking' vs. 'wanting' food in human appetite. Comment on '"You say it's liking, i say it's wanting...". On the difficulty of disentangling food reward in man'
    Graham Finlayson
    Institute of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
    Appetite 58:373-8; discussion 252-5. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Susceptibility to overeating affects the impact of savory or sweet drinks on satiation, reward, and food intake in nonobese women
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Nutr 142:125-30. 2012
  5. pmc Validation of a new hand-held electronic data capture method for continuous monitoring of subjective appetite sensations
    Catherine Gibbons
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 8:57. 2011
  6. doi request reprint Acute compensatory eating following exercise is associated with implicit hedonic wanting for food
    G Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
    Physiol Behav 97:62-7. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Liking vs. wanting food: importance for human appetite control and weight regulation
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev 31:987-1002. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Is it possible to dissociate 'liking' and 'wanting' for foods in humans? A novel experimental procedure
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Physiol Behav 90:36-42. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Is susceptibility to weight gain characterized by homeostatic or hedonic risk factors for overconsumption?
    John E Blundell
    Psychobiology Group, School of Psychology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Physiol Behav 82:21-5. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint The role of implicit wanting in relation to explicit liking and wanting for food: implications for appetite control
    Graham Finlayson
    Division of Psychology, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire G4 0BA, UK
    Appetite 50:120-7. 2008

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. doi request reprint Susceptibility to weight gain. Eating behaviour traits and physical activity as predictors of weight gain during the first year of university
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
    Appetite 58:1091-8. 2012
    ..Psychological markers underlying changes in body composition can inform strategies to promote self-regulation in young adults during a critical life period for weight gain...
  2. doi request reprint Implicit wanting and explicit liking are markers for trait binge eating. A susceptible phenotype for overeating
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Appetite 57:722-8. 2011
    ..Trait binge eating is functional at low levels and implicit wanting measured simultaneously with explicit liking may be useful markers for reward-driven overconsumption in this susceptible phenotype...
  3. doi request reprint Current progress in the assessment of 'liking' vs. 'wanting' food in human appetite. Comment on '"You say it's liking, i say it's wanting...". On the difficulty of disentangling food reward in man'
    Graham Finlayson
    Institute of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
    Appetite 58:373-8; discussion 252-5. 2012
    ..The evidence supports important theoretical and practical implications for a dual-process account of food reward; the developing nature of the research means the majority of these remain tantalisingly unexplored...
  4. doi request reprint Susceptibility to overeating affects the impact of savory or sweet drinks on satiation, reward, and food intake in nonobese women
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Nutr 142:125-30. 2012
    ..Savory taste has a stronger modulating effect on food preference than sweet or bland taste and may help to preserve normal appetite regulation in people who are susceptible to overeating...
  5. pmc Validation of a new hand-held electronic data capture method for continuous monitoring of subjective appetite sensations
    Catherine Gibbons
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 8:57. 2011
    ..The purpose of this study was to validate a novel hand-held method (EARS II (HP® iPAQ)) against the standard Pen and Paper (P&P) method and the previously validated EARS...
  6. doi request reprint Acute compensatory eating following exercise is associated with implicit hedonic wanting for food
    G Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
    Physiol Behav 97:62-7. 2009
    ..Some individuals could be resistant to the beneficial effects of exercise due to a predisposition to compensate for exercise-induced energy expenditure as a result of implicit changes in food preferences...
  7. ncbi request reprint Liking vs. wanting food: importance for human appetite control and weight regulation
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev 31:987-1002. 2007
    ..Further research into the dissociation of liking and wanting through implicit and explicit levels of processing would help to disclose the relative importance of these components of reward for appetite control and weight regulation...
  8. ncbi request reprint Is it possible to dissociate 'liking' and 'wanting' for foods in humans? A novel experimental procedure
    Graham Finlayson
    BioPsychology Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Physiol Behav 90:36-42. 2007
    ..Other experimental procedures may also be devised to separate 'liking' and 'wanting'...
  9. ncbi request reprint Is susceptibility to weight gain characterized by homeostatic or hedonic risk factors for overconsumption?
    John E Blundell
    Psychobiology Group, School of Psychology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Physiol Behav 82:21-5. 2004
    ..The theme of this essay was inspired by Gerry Smith's conceptual and experimental work on both homeostatic and hedonic mechanisms implicated in the control of food intake...
  10. ncbi request reprint The role of implicit wanting in relation to explicit liking and wanting for food: implications for appetite control
    Graham Finlayson
    Division of Psychology, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire G4 0BA, UK
    Appetite 50:120-7. 2008
    ..We suggest that implicit W is not systematically downregulated by the physiological consequences of food consumption in the same way as hunger and therefore may be largely independent of homoeostatic processes influencing intake...