Shiri Einav

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oxford
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Tell-tale eyes: children's attribution of gaze aversion as a lying cue
    Shiri Einav
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, England
    Dev Psychol 44:1655-67. 2008
  2. doi request reprint Eye-movement patterns are associated with communicative competence in autistic spectrum disorders
    Courtenay Frazier Norbury
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 50:834-42. 2009
  3. doi request reprint Do individuals with autism process words in context? Evidence from language-mediated eye-movements
    Jon Brock
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3UD, UK
    Cognition 108:896-904. 2008

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. doi request reprint Tell-tale eyes: children's attribution of gaze aversion as a lying cue
    Shiri Einav
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, England
    Dev Psychol 44:1655-67. 2008
    ..Furthermore, the growing appreciation of the stereotypic gaze behavior associated with lying and the reputed female advantage in gaze sensitivity may reflect differential processing of multimodal communication...
  2. doi request reprint Eye-movement patterns are associated with communicative competence in autistic spectrum disorders
    Courtenay Frazier Norbury
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, UK
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 50:834-42. 2009
    ..However, these studies have not distinguished different cognitive phenotypes...
  3. doi request reprint Do individuals with autism process words in context? Evidence from language-mediated eye-movements
    Jon Brock
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3UD, UK
    Cognition 108:896-904. 2008
    ..Instead, across both groups, the effect of sentence context was reduced in individuals with relatively poor language skills. Implications for the weak central coherence account of autism are discussed...