Karen M Douglas

Summary

Affiliation: University of Kent
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The hidden impact of conspiracy theories: perceived and actual influence of theories surrounding the death of Princess Diana
    Karen M Douglas
    Department of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, UK
    J Soc Psychol 148:210-21. 2008
  2. doi request reprint Constructive or cruel? Positive or patronizing? Reactions to expressions of positive and negative stereotypes of the mentally ill
    Karen M Douglas
    School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK
    Br J Psychol 102:97-107. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Does it take one to know one? Endorsement of conspiracy theories is influenced by personal willingness to conspire
    Karen M Douglas
    School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NP, United Kingdom
    Br J Soc Psychol 50:544-52. 2011
  4. ncbi request reprint The social consequences of conspiracism: Exposure to conspiracy theories decreases intentions to engage in politics and to reduce one's carbon footprint
    Daniel Jolley
    University of Kent, Canterbury, UK
    Br J Psychol 105:35-56. 2014
  5. doi request reprint Justice for whom, exactly? Beliefs in justice for the self and various others
    Robbie M Sutton
    Department of Psychology, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, England, UK
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 34:528-41. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Reactions to internal and external criticism of outgroups: social convention in the intergroup sensitivity effect
    Robbie M Sutton
    Keele University, UK
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 32:563-75. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Right about others, wrong about ourselves? Actual and perceived self-other differences in resistance to persuasion
    Karen M Douglas
    Department of Psychology, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK
    Br J Soc Psychol 43:585-603. 2004
  8. pmc The effects of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories on vaccination intentions
    Daniel Jolley
    School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 9:e89177. 2014
  9. ncbi request reprint Effects of communication goals and expectancies on language abstraction
    Karen M Douglas
    Department of Psychology, Keele University, Staffordshire, United Kingdom
    J Pers Soc Psychol 84:682-96. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi request reprint The hidden impact of conspiracy theories: perceived and actual influence of theories surrounding the death of Princess Diana
    Karen M Douglas
    Department of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, UK
    J Soc Psychol 148:210-21. 2008
    ..Results revealed that whereas participants in the second group accurately estimated others' attitude changes, they underestimated the extent to which their own attitudes were influenced...
  2. doi request reprint Constructive or cruel? Positive or patronizing? Reactions to expressions of positive and negative stereotypes of the mentally ill
    Karen M Douglas
    School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK
    Br J Psychol 102:97-107. 2011
    ..These reactions were mediated by the perceived constructiveness of the speaker's motives. Implications for the effectiveness of anti-discrimination campaigns are discussed...
  3. doi request reprint Does it take one to know one? Endorsement of conspiracy theories is influenced by personal willingness to conspire
    Karen M Douglas
    School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NP, United Kingdom
    Br J Soc Psychol 50:544-52. 2011
    ..These results suggest that some people think 'they conspired' because they think 'I would conspire'...
  4. ncbi request reprint The social consequences of conspiracism: Exposure to conspiracy theories decreases intentions to engage in politics and to reduce one's carbon footprint
    Daniel Jolley
    University of Kent, Canterbury, UK
    Br J Psychol 105:35-56. 2014
    ..The current findings suggest that conspiracy theories may have potentially significant social consequences, and highlight the need for further research on the social psychology of conspiracism...
  5. doi request reprint Justice for whom, exactly? Beliefs in justice for the self and various others
    Robbie M Sutton
    Department of Psychology, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, England, UK
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 34:528-41. 2008
    ..Women did not exempt themselves individually from injustice but believed, similar to men, that undergraduate women receive as much justice as men (Study 3)...
  6. ncbi request reprint Reactions to internal and external criticism of outgroups: social convention in the intergroup sensitivity effect
    Robbie M Sutton
    Keele University, UK
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 32:563-75. 2006
    ..Study 3 provides direct evidence that internal criticism is more conventionally acceptable than is external criticism...
  7. ncbi request reprint Right about others, wrong about ourselves? Actual and perceived self-other differences in resistance to persuasion
    Karen M Douglas
    Department of Psychology, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK
    Br J Soc Psychol 43:585-603. 2004
    ..Rather than overestimating others' attitude change, we found evidence that people underestimated the extent to which their own attitudes had, or would have, changed...
  8. pmc The effects of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories on vaccination intentions
    Daniel Jolley
    School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 9:e89177. 2014
    ..This effect was mediated by the same variables as in Study 1. These findings point to the potentially detrimental consequences of anti-vaccine conspiracy theories, and highlight their potential role in shaping health-related behaviors. ..
  9. ncbi request reprint Effects of communication goals and expectancies on language abstraction
    Karen M Douglas
    Department of Psychology, Keele University, Staffordshire, United Kingdom
    J Pers Soc Psychol 84:682-96. 2003
    ..Language abstraction is therefore both a medium for the transmission of existing beliefs and a tool by which communicators can create new beliefs...