T J Crow

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oxford
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Schizophrenia as the price that homo sapiens pays for language: a resolution of the central paradox in the origin of the species
    T J Crow
    POWIC, Warneford Hospital, University Department of Psychiatry, OX3 7JX, Oxford, UK
    Brain Res Brain Res Rev 31:118-29. 2000
  2. ncbi request reprint Relative hand skill predicts academic ability: global deficits at the point of hemispheric indecision
    T J Crow
    Prince of Wales International Centre, University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Neuropsychologia 36:1275-82. 1998
  3. ncbi request reprint Schneider's first rank symptoms and continuous performance disturbance as indices of dysconnectivity of left- and right-hemispheric components of language in schizophrenia
    Alfonso Ceccherini-Nelli
    Berkshire Health Care NHS Trust, Prospect Park Hospital, Honey End Lane, Reading RG30 4EJ, UK
    Schizophr Res 90:203-13. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Commentary on Annett, Yeo et al., Klar, Saugstad and Orr: cerebral asymmetry, language and psychosis--the case for a Homo sapiens-specific sex-linked gene for brain growth
    T J Crow
    POWIC, University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 39:219-31. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint Anomalies of cerebral asymmetry in schizophrenia interact with gender and age of onset: a post-mortem study
    J R Highley
    Department of Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 34:13-25. 1998
  6. ncbi request reprint Temporal-lobe length is reduced, and gyral folding is increased in schizophrenia: a post-mortem study
    J R Highley
    Department of Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 34:1-12. 1998
  7. doi request reprint Where and what is the right shift factor or cerebral dominance gene? A critique of Francks et al. (2007)
    T J Crow
    Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Laterality 14:3-10. 2009
  8. pmc Replication profile of PCDH11X and PCDH11Y, a gene pair located in the non-pseudoautosomal homologous region Xq21.3/Yp11.2
    N D Wilson
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, UK
    Chromosome Res 15:485-98. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Fiber content of the fornix in schizophrenia: lack of evidence for a primary limbic encephalopathy
    S A Chance
    Department of Clinical Neurology, Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Am J Psychiatry 156:1720-4. 1999
  10. ncbi request reprint Childhood precursors of psychosis as clues to its evolutionary origins
    T J Crow
    University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 245:61-9. 1995

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications31

  1. ncbi request reprint Schizophrenia as the price that homo sapiens pays for language: a resolution of the central paradox in the origin of the species
    T J Crow
    POWIC, Warneford Hospital, University Department of Psychiatry, OX3 7JX, Oxford, UK
    Brain Res Brain Res Rev 31:118-29. 2000
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Relative hand skill predicts academic ability: global deficits at the point of hemispheric indecision
    T J Crow
    Prince of Wales International Centre, University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Neuropsychologia 36:1275-82. 1998
    ..The variation associated with degrees of dominance may reflect the operation of continuing selection on the gene (postulated to be X-Y linked) by which language evolved and speciation occurred...
  3. ncbi request reprint Schneider's first rank symptoms and continuous performance disturbance as indices of dysconnectivity of left- and right-hemispheric components of language in schizophrenia
    Alfonso Ceccherini-Nelli
    Berkshire Health Care NHS Trust, Prospect Park Hospital, Honey End Lane, Reading RG30 4EJ, UK
    Schizophr Res 90:203-13. 2007
    ..Here we investigate pathophysiological dimensions (language disturbance, negative symptoms, lateralisation and the continuous performance test) in relation to ICD-10 and DSM-IV concepts of diagnosis...
  4. ncbi request reprint Commentary on Annett, Yeo et al., Klar, Saugstad and Orr: cerebral asymmetry, language and psychosis--the case for a Homo sapiens-specific sex-linked gene for brain growth
    T J Crow
    POWIC, University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 39:219-31. 1999
    ..Crow, T.J., Renowden, S., Wardell, M., Smith, D.M., Anslow, P., in press. Is the course of brain development in schizophrenia delayed? Evidence from onsets in adolescence. Schizophr. Res.)...
  5. ncbi request reprint Anomalies of cerebral asymmetry in schizophrenia interact with gender and age of onset: a post-mortem study
    J R Highley
    Department of Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 34:13-25. 1998
    ..The findings also suggest that there is an interaction between gender and cerebral asymmetry that is critical in determining age of onset...
  6. ncbi request reprint Temporal-lobe length is reduced, and gyral folding is increased in schizophrenia: a post-mortem study
    J R Highley
    Department of Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 34:1-12. 1998
    ..These two structural changes may reflect an alteration of the cortico-cortical connectivity of the brain in schizophrenia...
  7. doi request reprint Where and what is the right shift factor or cerebral dominance gene? A critique of Francks et al. (2007)
    T J Crow
    Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Laterality 14:3-10. 2009
    ....
  8. pmc Replication profile of PCDH11X and PCDH11Y, a gene pair located in the non-pseudoautosomal homologous region Xq21.3/Yp11.2
    N D Wilson
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, UK
    Chromosome Res 15:485-98. 2007
    ..Our data are relevant to the complex relationship between X-inactivation, as a chromosome-wide phenomenon, and asynchrony of replication and expression status of single genes on chromosome X...
  9. ncbi request reprint Fiber content of the fornix in schizophrenia: lack of evidence for a primary limbic encephalopathy
    S A Chance
    Department of Clinical Neurology, Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Am J Psychiatry 156:1720-4. 1999
    ..The fornix is a major pathway through which neurons project to and from the hippocampus. The authors investigated whether the fiber number or structure of the fornix is abnormal in schizophrenia, as was suggested by an earlier MRI study...
  10. ncbi request reprint Childhood precursors of psychosis as clues to its evolutionary origins
    T J Crow
    University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 245:61-9. 1995
    ..It is argued that the psychoses represent extremes of variation in a gene (or genes) that differs between sexes and controls the timing of development of the two cerebral hemispheres.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)..
  11. ncbi request reprint The size and fibre composition of the corpus callosum with respect to gender and schizophrenia: a post-mortem study
    J R Highley
    Department of Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Brain 122:99-110. 1999
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint The dorsal raphe nucleus in schizophrenia: a post mortem study of 5-hydroxytryptamine neurones
    R M Craven
    Schizophrenia Research Group, University Department of Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 31:258-69. 2005
    ..Our results do not support the proposal that an abnormality in the number and/or size of DRN 5-HT neurones is central to the aetiopathology of schizophrenia...
  13. ncbi request reprint Handedness, language lateralisation and anatomical asymmetry: relevance of protocadherin XY to hominid speciation and the aetiology of psychosis. Point of view
    T J Crow
    POWIC, Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 181:295-7. 2002
  14. ncbi request reprint Reduced density of calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons in the planum temporale in schizophrenia
    S A Chance
    Schizophrenia Research, Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Brain Res 1046:32-7. 2005
    ..Loss of columnar inhibition may result in reduced minicolumnar segregation and altered cell size may reflect altered minicolumn size...
  15. ncbi request reprint Callosal misconnectivity and the sex difference in psychosis
    T J Crow
    SANE POWIC, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Int Rev Psychiatry 19:449-57. 2007
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint The locus coeruleus in schizophrenia: a postmortem study of noradrenergic neurones
    R M Craven
    Schizophrenia Research Group, University Department of Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 31:115-26. 2005
    ..The findings presented here concur with previous studies suggesting that noradrenergic dysfunction in schizophrenia is not associated with an anatomical abnormality at the level of the LC...
  17. doi request reprint Schizophrenia as variation in the sapiens-specific epigenetic instruction to the embryo
    T J Crow
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, SANE POWIC, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Clin Genet 81:319-24. 2012
    ..Diversity in meiotic pairing is postulated as the basis for species-specific deviations in development associated with psychosis...
  18. doi request reprint 'The missing genes: what happened to the heritability of psychiatric disorders?'
    T J Crow
    SANE POWIC, University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Mol Psychiatry 16:362-4. 2011
    ..Thus sexually dimorphic variation that distinguishes the species may be transmitted between generations in epigenetic form that evades detection by linkage and association...
  19. doi request reprint A theory of the origin of cerebral asymmetry: epigenetic variation superimposed on a fixed right-shift
    T J Crow
    SANE POWIC, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK
    Laterality 15:289-303. 2010
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint PCDH11 is X/Y homologous in Homo sapiens but not in Gorilla gorilla and Pan troglodytes
    N D Wilson
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Cytogenet Genome Res 114:137-9. 2006
    ..By confirmingthe suspected lack of X-Y homologous status for PCDH11 in non-human primates, our results reinforce the hypothesis of a hominid-specific role for this gene in brain development...
  21. ncbi request reprint Nuclear schizophrenic symptoms as a window on the relationship between thought and speech
    T J Crow
    Prince of Wales International Centre, University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford
    Br J Psychiatry 173:303-9. 1998
    ..Symptoms of schizophrenia known as 'nuclear' or 'first-rank' are found in all populations. The genetic variation that gives rise to them must be as old as modern Homo sapiens...
  22. ncbi request reprint A postmortem study of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus in schizophrenia
    T J Cullen
    Department of Clinical Neurology Neuropathology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, OX2 6HE, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 60:157-66. 2003
    ..Hence our negative observations, in the largest sample yet investigated, cast doubt on the robustness and/or the generalisability of MD neuropathology in schizophrenia...
  23. ncbi request reprint The cytoarchitecture of sulcal folding in Heschl's sulcus and the temporal cortex in the normal brain and schizophrenia: lamina thickness and cell density
    S A Chance
    Schizophrenia Research Group, Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK
    Neurosci Lett 367:384-8. 2004
    ..Sampling methods should consider that cortical folding affects cell and lamina distribution in the sampled region in a highly localised manner...
  24. ncbi request reprint A genome-wide search for schizophrenia susceptibility genes
    S H Shaw
    Axys Pharmaceuticals, La Jolla, California, USA
    Am J Med Genet 81:364-76. 1998
    ..0, allowing for heterogeneity. These regions will be saturated with additional markers and investigated in a new, larger set of families to test for replication...
  25. doi request reprint Craddock & Owen vs Kraepelin: 85 years late, mesmerised by "polygenes"
    T J Crow
    SANE POWIC, University Department of Psychiatry, Oxford OX3 7JX, United Kingdom
    Schizophr Res 103:156-60. 2008
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint Schizophrenia and the frontal lobes: post-mortem stereological study of tissue volume
    J R Highley
    Schizophrenia Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurology (Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 178:337-43. 2001
    ..CONCLUSIONS: Such structural abnormalities as are present in the frontal lobes are more subtle than straightforward alterations in tissue volume; they may include changes in shape and the pattern of gyral folding...
  27. ncbi request reprint Is DISC1 really a gene predisposing to psychosis?
    T J Crow
    Br J Psychiatry 190:270; author reply 270-1. 2007
  28. ncbi request reprint Adult psychosis, common childhood infections and neurological soft signs in a national birth cohort
    S J Leask
    Department of Psychiatry and Community Mental Health, University of Nottingham, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 181:387-92. 2002
    ..Neurological soft signs preceding adult-onset schizophrenia suggest a neurodevelopmental origin and could reflect physical illness in childhood...
  29. ncbi request reprint Speciation and schizophrenia: literature anticipates science
    T J Crow
    Lancet 367:727. 2006
  30. ncbi request reprint Obstetric complications and schizophrenia
    T J Crow
    Am J Psychiatry 160:1011-2; author reply 1012. 2003
  31. ncbi request reprint Size of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia
    J R Highley
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 183:414-7. 2003
    ..Meta-analyses of hippocampal size have indicated that this structure is smaller in schizophrenia. This could reflect a reduction in the size of constituent neurons or a reduced number of neurons...