R H Crompton

Summary

Affiliation: University of Liverpool
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc The role of load-carrying in the evolution of modern body proportions
    W J Wang
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, UK
    J Anat 204:417-30. 2004
  2. pmc Human-like external function of the foot, and fully upright gait, confirmed in the 3.66 million year old Laetoli hominin footprints by topographic statistics, experimental footprint-formation and computer simulation
    Robin H Crompton
    Institute of Aging and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Sherrington Buildings, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    J R Soc Interface 9:707-19. 2012
  3. pmc Locomotion and posture from the common hominoid ancestor to fully modern hominins, with special reference to the last common panin/hominin ancestor
    R H Crompton
    School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Sherrington Buildings, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    J Anat 212:501-43. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint The mechanics of food reduction in Tarsius bancanus. Hard-object feeder, soft-object feeder or both?
    R H Crompton
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, UK
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 69:41-59. 1998
  5. ncbi request reprint The mechanical effectiveness of erect and "bent-hip, bent-knee" bipedal walking in Australopithecus afarensis
    R H Crompton
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool
    J Hum Evol 35:55-74. 1998
  6. pmc Arboreality, terrestriality and bipedalism
    Robin Huw Crompton
    Primate Evolution and Morphology Research Group, School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Sherrington Buildings, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:3301-14. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Analysis of the human and ape foot during bipedal standing with implications for the evolution of the foot
    W J Wang
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX, UK
    J Biomech 37:1831-6. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Reconstructing the mechanics of quadrupedalism in an extinct hominoid
    Y Li
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    Z Morphol Anthropol 83:265-74. 2002
  9. pmc Does footprint depth correlate with foot motion and pressure?
    K T Bates
    Evolutionary Morphology and Biomechanics Research Group, Department of Musculoskeletal Biology, Institute of Aging and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Sherrington Building, Ashton Street, Liverpool, UK
    J R Soc Interface 10:20130009. 2013
  10. ncbi request reprint Energetic efficiency and ecology as selective factors in the saltatory adaptation of prosimian primates
    R H Crompton
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, U K
    Proc Biol Sci 254:41-5. 1993

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. pmc The role of load-carrying in the evolution of modern body proportions
    W J Wang
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, UK
    J Anat 204:417-30. 2004
    ..Thus, selection for effectiveness in load-carrying, as well as in endurant walking, is indeed likely to have been implicated in the evolution of modern body proportions...
  2. pmc Human-like external function of the foot, and fully upright gait, confirmed in the 3.66 million year old Laetoli hominin footprints by topographic statistics, experimental footprint-formation and computer simulation
    Robin H Crompton
    Institute of Aging and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Sherrington Buildings, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    J R Soc Interface 9:707-19. 2012
    ..66 Mya. This finding provides strong support to those previous studies which have interpreted the G-1 prints as generally modern in aspect...
  3. pmc Locomotion and posture from the common hominoid ancestor to fully modern hominins, with special reference to the last common panin/hominin ancestor
    R H Crompton
    School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Sherrington Buildings, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    J Anat 212:501-43. 2008
    ..Derivation of habitual terrestrial bipedality from arboreal hand-assisted bipedality requires fewer transitions, and is also kinematically and kinetically more parsimonious...
  4. ncbi request reprint The mechanics of food reduction in Tarsius bancanus. Hard-object feeder, soft-object feeder or both?
    R H Crompton
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, UK
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 69:41-59. 1998
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint The mechanical effectiveness of erect and "bent-hip, bent-knee" bipedal walking in Australopithecus afarensis
    R H Crompton
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool
    J Hum Evol 35:55-74. 1998
    ..Such an ineffective gait is unlikely to have lead to selection for "bipedal" features in the postcranial skeleton...
  6. pmc Arboreality, terrestriality and bipedalism
    Robin Huw Crompton
    Primate Evolution and Morphology Research Group, School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Liverpool, Sherrington Buildings, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:3301-14. 2010
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Analysis of the human and ape foot during bipedal standing with implications for the evolution of the foot
    W J Wang
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX, UK
    J Biomech 37:1831-6. 2004
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Reconstructing the mechanics of quadrupedalism in an extinct hominoid
    Y Li
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    Z Morphol Anthropol 83:265-74. 2002
    ..It may reasonably be assumed that Proconsul's quadrupedal mode was similar to that of living macaques...
  9. pmc Does footprint depth correlate with foot motion and pressure?
    K T Bates
    Evolutionary Morphology and Biomechanics Research Group, Department of Musculoskeletal Biology, Institute of Aging and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Sherrington Building, Ashton Street, Liverpool, UK
    J R Soc Interface 10:20130009. 2013
    ..Overall, our results indicate that extreme caution is required when applying the 'depth equals pressure' paradigm to hominin footprints, and by extension, those of other extant and extinct tetrapods...
  10. ncbi request reprint Energetic efficiency and ecology as selective factors in the saltatory adaptation of prosimian primates
    R H Crompton
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, U K
    Proc Biol Sci 254:41-5. 1993
    ..Ecological' factors, such as time pressure and habitat support density, may thus be the prime consideration for many species in determining the manner in which they jump...
  11. ncbi request reprint Energy transformation during erect and 'bent-hip, bent-knee' walking by humans with implications for the evolution of bipedalism
    W J Wang
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, UK
    J Hum Evol 44:563-79. 2003
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Free vertical moments and transverse forces in human walking and their role in relation to arm-swing
    Y Li
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    J Exp Biol 204:47-58. 2001
    ..Both are of reduced importance in slow walking...
  13. ncbi request reprint Dimensions and moment arms of the hind- and forelimb muscles of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)
    S K Thorpe
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, New Medical School, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GE United Kingdom
    Am J Phys Anthropol 110:179-99. 1999
    ..These differences in muscle architecture and function help to explain why chimpanzees are restricted in their ability to walk, and particularly to run bipedally...
  14. ncbi request reprint Optimum ratio of upper to lower limb lengths in hand-carrying of a load under the assumption of frequency coordination
    W J Wang
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, L69 3BX, Liverpool, UK
    J Biomech 36:249-52. 2003
    ..Under reduced selection pressure for hand-carrying, but unreduced selection for mechanical effectiveness, we might expect humans to evolve a longer upper limb, to improve swing symmetry when unloaded...
  15. doi request reprint The biomechanics of leaping in gibbons
    A J Channon
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Ashton Street, Liverpool, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 143:403-16. 2010
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Nonlinear spatial warping for between-subjects pedobarographic image registration
    T C Pataky
    HACB, University of Liverpool, UK
    Gait Posture 29:477-82. 2009
    ..001). These data demonstrate that nonlinear spatial warping is necessary for robust between-subject pedobarographic image registration and, by extension, robust homologous data comparison at the pixel level...
  17. ncbi request reprint Stresses in human leg muscles in running and jumping determined by force plate analysis and from published magnetic resonance images
    S K Thorpe
    Department of Human Anatomy, Liverpool University, New Medical School, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    J Exp Biol 201:63-70. 1998
    ..These stresses are lower than those previously calculated from cadaveric data, but are in the range expected from physiological experiments on isolated muscles...
  18. ncbi request reprint Size and power required for motion with implication for the evolution of early hominids
    W J Wang
    Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Liverpool, L69 3BX, Liverpool, UK
    J Biomech 36:1237-46. 2003
    ..If mobility and stability under loading are the selective criteria, however, human size should not substantially increase in the future...
  19. ncbi request reprint Predicting the metabolic energy costs of bipedalism using evolutionary robotics
    W I Sellers
    Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK
    J Exp Biol 206:1127-36. 2003
    ..In addition, the animations produced by this technique are qualitatively very convincing, which suggests that this may also be a useful technique for visualizing bipedal locomotion...
  20. ncbi request reprint Origin of human bipedalism as an adaptation for locomotion on flexible branches
    S K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Science 316:1328-31. 2007
    ..Human bipedalism is thus less an innovation than an exploitation of a locomotor behavior retained from the common great ape ancestor...
  21. ncbi request reprint Stresses exerted in the hindlimb muscles of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) during bipedal locomotion
    S K S Thorpe
    Department of Human Biology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 75:253-65. 2004
    ..During a slow walk, untrained chimpanzees were found to exert far greater muscle stresses than humans do when running at moderate speed, particularly in the muscles that extend the hip, because of the bent-hip, bent-knee posture...
  22. pmc Morphological analysis of the hindlimb in apes and humans. II. Moment arms
    R C Payne
    Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts, UK
    J Anat 208:725-42. 2006
    ..This study was performed on a small sample of apes and thus differences noted here warrant further investigation in larger populations...
  23. pmc Orangutans use compliant branches to lower the energetic cost of locomotion
    S K S Thorpe
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B152TT, UK
    Biol Lett 3:253-6. 2007
    ..This study seems to be the first to show that elastic compliance in arboreal supports can be used to reduce the energetic cost of gap crossing...
  24. pmc Assessing mechanical function of the zygomatic region in macaques: validation and sensitivity testing of finite element models
    K Kupczik
    Hull York Medical School, The University of York, UK
    J Anat 210:41-53. 2007
    ..This has implications when investigating craniofacial growth and masticatory function but should generally be taken into account in functional analyses of the craniofacial system of both extant and extinct species...
  25. pmc Morphological analysis of the hindlimb in apes and humans. I. Muscle architecture
    R C Payne
    Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, UK
    J Anat 208:709-24. 2006
    ..Such an arrangement of muscle architecture would be useful for locomotion in a three dimensionally complex arboreal environment...
  26. ncbi request reprint Automatic monitoring of primate locomotor behaviour using accelerometers
    W I Sellers
    Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 75:279-93. 2004
    ..Cyclic activities were less well characterised, but calibration should permit travel distance estimations equalling or bettering those from conventional techniques...