David A Coomes

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cambridge
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Challenges to the generality of WBE theory
    David A Coomes
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK, CB3 2EA
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:593-6. 2006
  2. pmc Scaling of tree vascular transport systems along gradients of nutrient supply and altitude
    David A Coomes
    University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Biol Lett 3:86-9. 2007
  3. pmc Scaling of xylem vessels and veins within the leaves of oak species
    David A Coomes
    University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Biol Lett 4:302-6. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Use of an airborne lidar system to model plant species composition and diversity of Mediterranean oak forests
    William D Simonson
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EA, United Kingdom
    Conserv Biol 26:840-50. 2012
  5. ncbi request reprint Soil nutrient supply modulates temperature-induction cues in mast-seeding grasses
    Andrew J Tanentzap
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EA, United Kingdom
    Ecology 93:462-9. 2012
  6. pmc Quantifying variation in forest disturbance, and its effects on aboveground biomass dynamics, across the eastern United States
    Mark C Vanderwel
    Computational Ecology and Environmental Science Group, Microsoft Research, 21 Station Road, Cambridge, CB1 2FB, UK Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA
    Glob Chang Biol 19:1504-17. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Comment on "Plant species richness and ecosystem multifunctionality in global drylands"
    Tommaso Jucker
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Science 337:155; author reply 155. 2012
  8. pmc Trends in entropy production during ecosystem development in the Amazon Basin
    Robert J Holdaway
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB3 2EA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:1437-47. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Comment on "A brief history of seed size"
    Peter J Grubb
    Department of Plant Sciences, Cambridge University, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Science 310:783; author reply 783. 2005
  10. pmc The effects of sampling bias and model complexity on the predictive performance of MaxEnt species distribution models
    Mindy M Syfert
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 8:e55158. 2013

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. ncbi request reprint Challenges to the generality of WBE theory
    David A Coomes
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK, CB3 2EA
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:593-6. 2006
    ..For WBE theory to be relevant to plant community dynamics, more complex models are required to deal with the influences of competition for light, nutrient supply and disturbance experienced by such communities...
  2. pmc Scaling of tree vascular transport systems along gradients of nutrient supply and altitude
    David A Coomes
    University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Biol Lett 3:86-9. 2007
    ..Thus, conduit tapering relationships appear to be invariant with respect to environmental conditions...
  3. pmc Scaling of xylem vessels and veins within the leaves of oak species
    David A Coomes
    University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Biol Lett 4:302-6. 2008
    ..These findings indicate that leaf vasculature needs to be included in whole-plant scaling models, for these to accurately reflect and predict whole-plant transport and its implications for performance and ecology...
  4. doi request reprint Use of an airborne lidar system to model plant species composition and diversity of Mediterranean oak forests
    William D Simonson
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EA, United Kingdom
    Conserv Biol 26:840-50. 2012
    ..However, particular attention needs to be paid to issues of survey design: density of lidar points and geospatial accuracy of ground-truthing and its timing relative to acquisition of lidar data...
  5. ncbi request reprint Soil nutrient supply modulates temperature-induction cues in mast-seeding grasses
    Andrew J Tanentzap
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EA, United Kingdom
    Ecology 93:462-9. 2012
    ..Thus, predicting masting requires a consideration of the interactions among climate, the internal resources of plants, and mineral nutrient uptake...
  6. pmc Quantifying variation in forest disturbance, and its effects on aboveground biomass dynamics, across the eastern United States
    Mark C Vanderwel
    Computational Ecology and Environmental Science Group, Microsoft Research, 21 Station Road, Cambridge, CB1 2FB, UK Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA
    Glob Chang Biol 19:1504-17. 2013
    ..The effects of increased tree mortality on carbon stocks and forest composition may thus depend partly on whether future mortality increases are chronic or episodic in nature...
  7. doi request reprint Comment on "Plant species richness and ecosystem multifunctionality in global drylands"
    Tommaso Jucker
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Science 337:155; author reply 155. 2012
    ..This suggests that biodiversity loss may have especially strong consequences in harsh environments...
  8. pmc Trends in entropy production during ecosystem development in the Amazon Basin
    Robert J Holdaway
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB3 2EA, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:1437-47. 2010
    ..We conclude that, although further work is required, entropy production could potentially provide a much-needed theoretical basis for understanding the effects of deforestation and land-use change on the land-surface energy balance...
  9. ncbi request reprint Comment on "A brief history of seed size"
    Peter J Grubb
    Department of Plant Sciences, Cambridge University, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Science 310:783; author reply 783. 2005
  10. pmc The effects of sampling bias and model complexity on the predictive performance of MaxEnt species distribution models
    Mindy M Syfert
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 8:e55158. 2013
    ..Our study emphasizes the importance of reducing geographical sampling bias, where possible, in datasets used to train SDMs, and the effectiveness and essentialness of sampling bias correction within MaxEnt...
  11. ncbi request reprint Tree fern trunks facilitate seedling regeneration in a productive lowland temperate rain forest
    Aurora Gaxiola
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Oecologia 155:325-35. 2008
    ..Our study shows evidence of direct facilitative interactions by tree ferns during seedling establishment in plant communities associated with nutrient-rich soils...
  12. doi request reprint Carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems: do browsing and grazing herbivores matter?
    Andrew J Tanentzap
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 87:72-94. 2012
    ..We suggest that herbivore removal might represent an important strategy towards increasing terrestrial carbon stocks at local and regional scales within specific vegetation types, since humans influence populations of most large mammals...
  13. pmc Disturbance affects short-term facilitation, but not long-term saturation, of exotic plant invasion in New Zealand forest
    Laura A Spence
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 278:1457-66. 2011
    ..Our results show that disturbance frequency has surprisingly little influence on the long-term trajectory of invasion, while invader persistence strongly determines invasion patterns...
  14. pmc Influences of forest structure, climate and species composition on tree mortality across the eastern US
    Emily R Lines
    Forest Conservation and Ecology Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e13212. 2010
    ....
  15. doi request reprint Arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculum potential: a mechanism promoting positive diversity-invasibility relationships in mountain beech forests in New Zealand?
    Laura A Spence
    Forest Ecology and Conservation Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Mycorrhiza 21:309-14. 2011
    ....
  16. pmc Monocot leaves are eaten less than dicot leaves in tropical lowland rain forests: correlations with toughness and leaf presentation
    Peter J Grubb
    Plant Sciences Department, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Ann Bot 101:1379-89. 2008
    ....
  17. pmc Patterns and drivers of tree mortality in iberian forests: climatic effects are modified by competition
    Paloma Ruiz-Benito
    Department of Forest Ecology and Genetics, Forest Research Center Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria, Madrid, Spain
    PLoS ONE 8:e56843. 2013
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Differential responses of vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores to traits of New Zealand subalpine shrubs
    Andrew J Tanentzap
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB23EA, United Kingdom
    Ecology 92:994-9. 2011
    ..Overall, our results demonstrate the importance of herbivore type and coevolved interactions for the adaptive significance of plant traits...
  19. ncbi request reprint Growth-size scaling relationships of woody plant species differ from predictions of the Metabolic Ecology Model
    Sabrina E Russo
    Conservation and Community Ecology Group, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK
    Ecol Lett 10:889-901. 2007
    ..Based on a quantitative test, violation of these assumptions alone could not explain the model's poor fit to our data, possibly reflecting multiple, unsound assumptions, as well as unaccounted-for variation that should be incorporated...
  20. ncbi request reprint Long-term effects of wildfire on ecosystem properties across an island area gradient
    David A Wardle
    Department of Forest Vegetation Ecology, Faculty of Forestry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE901 83 Umeå, Sweden
    Science 300:972-5. 2003
    ..This contributes to greater carbon storage with increasing time since fire; for every century without a major fire, an additional 0.5 kilograms per square meter of carbon becomes stored in the humus...