Tim H Clutton-Brock

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cambridge
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Primate socioecology at the crossroads: past, present, and future
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    University of Cambridge
    Evol Anthropol 21:136-50. 2012
  2. doi request reprint The evolution of social philopatry and dispersal in female mammals
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Mol Ecol 21:472-92. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Individuals and populations: the role of long-term, individual-based studies of animals in ecology and evolutionary biology
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, CB2 3EJ
    Trends Ecol Evol 25:562-73. 2010
  4. ncbi request reprint Red deer stocks in the Highlands of Scotland
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 429:261-2. 2004
  5. doi request reprint Cooperation between non-kin in animal societies
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB3 9EJ, UK
    Nature 462:51-7. 2009
  6. pmc Structure and function in mammalian societies
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:3229-42. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Female mate choice in mammals
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Q Rev Biol 84:3-27. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Intrasexual competition and sexual selection in cooperative mammals
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 444:1065-8. 2006
  9. pmc Sex differences in ageing in natural populations of vertebrates
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:3097-104. 2007
  10. pmc Density-related changes in sexual selection in red deer
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 264:1509-16. 1997

Detail Information

Publications47

  1. doi request reprint Primate socioecology at the crossroads: past, present, and future
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    University of Cambridge
    Evol Anthropol 21:136-50. 2012
    ....
  2. doi request reprint The evolution of social philopatry and dispersal in female mammals
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Mol Ecol 21:472-92. 2012
    ....
  3. doi request reprint Individuals and populations: the role of long-term, individual-based studies of animals in ecology and evolutionary biology
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, CB2 3EJ
    Trends Ecol Evol 25:562-73. 2010
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Red deer stocks in the Highlands of Scotland
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 429:261-2. 2004
    ..Although there would be environmental benefits in reducing deer numbers, there is an equal need to reduce the numbers of hill sheep in many parts of the Highlands...
  5. doi request reprint Cooperation between non-kin in animal societies
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB3 9EJ, UK
    Nature 462:51-7. 2009
    ....
  6. pmc Structure and function in mammalian societies
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:3229-42. 2009
    ..As yet, there is little need to invoke group-level adaptations in order to account for the behaviour of individuals or the structure of mammalian groups...
  7. ncbi request reprint Female mate choice in mammals
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Q Rev Biol 84:3-27. 2009
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Intrasexual competition and sexual selection in cooperative mammals
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 444:1065-8. 2006
    ....
  9. pmc Sex differences in ageing in natural populations of vertebrates
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:3097-104. 2007
    ..Our results are consistent with the suggestion that sex differences in senescence in polygynous species are a consequence of weaker selection for longevity in males than females...
  10. pmc Density-related changes in sexual selection in red deer
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 264:1509-16. 1997
    ..These results support the contention that, where high population density is associated with a female-biased adult sex ratio, competition for mates is likely to decline...
  11. doi request reprint Adaptive suppression of subordinate reproduction in cooperative mammals
    Tim H Clutton-Brock
    Large Animal Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 176:664-73. 2010
    ..We review evidence from other studies that the suppression of reproduction by subordinates varies with the likely costs of subordinate breeding to dominants...
  12. pmc Comparative ungulate dynamics: the devil is in the detail
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Large Animal Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:1285-98. 2002
    ....
  13. pmc Infanticide and expulsion of females in a cooperative mammal
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 265:2291-5. 1998
    ..Female helpers initially resist expulsion and repeatedly attempt to return to their natal group, indicating that it is unlikely that dominant females need to grant them reproductive concessions to retain them in the group...
  14. pmc Individual contributions to babysitting in a cooperative mongoose, Suricata suricatta
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 267:301-5. 2000
    ..Provision of food to some group members raises the contributions of individuals to babysitting. We discuss the implications of these results for evolutionary explanations of cooperative behaviour...
  15. ncbi request reprint Sexual selection in males and females
    Tim Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Science 318:1882-5. 2007
    ....
  16. doi request reprint Factors affecting the reproductive success of dominant male meerkats
    Goran F Spong
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Mol Ecol 17:2287-99. 2008
    ..As the time spent in the dominant position and reproductive rate while dominant explain > 80% of the total variance in reproductive success, group composition thus has major implications for male reproductive success...
  17. doi request reprint Reproductive senescence in a cooperatively breeding mammal
    Stuart P Sharp
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Anim Ecol 79:176-83. 2010
    ..Breeding success declined with age despite the sharing of reproductive costs in this species, but further study is needed to investigate whether helping affects other aspects of senescence, including survival...
  18. pmc Individual contributions to territory defence in a cooperative breeder: weighing up the benefits and costs
    Rafael Mares
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:3989-95. 2012
    ..Our findings support the view that investment in cooperative behaviours can be attributed to benefits and costs, and highlight the additional importance of considering trade-offs in investment between cooperative behaviours...
  19. doi request reprint Lifetime growth in wild meerkats: incorporating life history and environmental factors into a standard growth model
    Sinead English
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Oecologia 169:143-53. 2012
    ..Our study demonstrates how simple growth curves may be improved by considering life history and environmental factors, which may be particularly relevant when quantifying growth patterns in wild populations...
  20. ncbi request reprint The relationship between tooth wear, habitat quality and late-life reproduction in a wild red deer population
    Daniel H Nussey
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK
    J Anim Ecol 76:402-12. 2007
    ..4. There was no evidence that females with more heavily worn molars had reduced reproductive performance late in life or that first molar height was associated with reproductive senescence...
  21. pmc Calling in the gap: competition or cooperation in littermates' begging behaviour?
    Joah R Madden
    Large Animal Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 276:1255-62. 2009
    ..Such behaviour is also preferred by provisioning adults, thus providing additional benefits to the pups...
  22. pmc Odour-based kin discrimination in the cooperatively breeding meerkat
    Sarah Leclaire
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Biol Lett 9:20121054. 2013
    ..Our study provides a key starting point for further investigations into the use of kin recognition for inbreeding avoidance in the widely studied meerkat...
  23. pmc Sex differences in responsiveness to begging in a cooperative mammal
    Sinead English
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Biol Lett 4:334-7. 2008
    ..In addition, they emphasize that generosity provides a more sensitive measure of responsiveness to begging than feeding rate, as it accounts for variation in foraging success...
  24. doi request reprint Density dependence in group dynamics of a highly social mongoose, Suricata suricatta
    Andrew W Bateman
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Anim Ecol 81:628-39. 2012
    ..6. Our findings highlight the need to consider demographic processes and density dependence in subpopulations before drawing conclusions about how behaviour affects population processes in socially complex systems...
  25. pmc Manipulating grooming by decreasing ectoparasite load causes unpredicted changes in antagonism
    Joah R Madden
    Large Animal Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 276:1263-8. 2009
    ..We suggest that meerkats use allogrooming (and submissions) as a facultative response to antagonism, rather than a pre-emptive strategy to avert it by establishing a network of associations, as has been suggested for primates...
  26. pmc The number of subordinates moderates intrasexual competition among males in cooperatively breeding meerkats
    Nobuyuki Kutsukake
    Large Animal Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:209-16. 2008
    ..This study provides an empirical data agreeing with the biological market theory in the context of intrasexual competition in cooperatively breeding species...
  27. doi request reprint Exploring individual quality in a wild population of red deer
    Kelly Moyes
    Institute of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, UK
    J Anim Ecol 78:406-13. 2009
    ..5. This variation in tactics makes it challenging to characterize individual quality as a simple scalar; measures of heterogeneity in ecological studies should therefore be both species and question specific...
  28. pmc Experimental peripheral administration of oxytocin elevates a suite of cooperative behaviours in a wild social mammal
    Joah R Madden
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 278:1189-94. 2011
    ..It may also explain why social species typically exhibit a suite of cooperative behaviours, without having to invoke independent evolution of each...
  29. pmc Shared spatial effects on quantitative genetic parameters: accounting for spatial autocorrelation and home range overlap reduces estimates of heritability in wild red deer
    Katie V Stopher
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JT, United Kingdom
    Evolution 66:2411-26. 2012
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint The causes of physiological suppression among female meerkats: a role for subordinate restraint due to the threat of infanticide?
    Andrew J Young
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EJ, UK
    Horm Behav 53:131-9. 2008
    ....
  31. doi request reprint Validating methods for estimating endocranial volume in individual red deer (Cervus elaphus)
    Corina J Logan
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Behav Processes 92:143-6. 2013
    ..This study illustrates the importance of validating intraspecies measurement methods, which allows for the accurate interpretation of results...
  32. pmc Cost minimization by helpers in cooperative vertebrates
    A F Russell
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:3333-8. 2003
    ..These results provide a unique demonstration that despite significant short-term costs, helpers, like breeders, are able to reduce the fitness consequences of these costs through behavioral modifications...
  33. pmc The energetics of lactation in cooperatively breeding meerkats Suricata suricatta
    M Scantlebury
    Mammal Research Unit, School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:2147-53. 2002
    ..These results indicate that helpers have beneficial energetic consequences for lactating mothers in an obligate cooperatively breeding mammal...
  34. ncbi request reprint Evolution and development of sex differences in cooperative behavior in meerkats
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Science 297:253-6. 2002
    ..These findings support the view that direct, mutualistic benefits are important in the evolution of specialized cooperative behavior...
  35. ncbi request reprint Determinants of reproductive success in dominant female meerkats
    Sarah J Hodge
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Anim Ecol 77:92-102. 2008
    ..We suggest that similar consequences of competition may occur among females in other cooperative societies where the benefits of attaining dominance status are high...
  36. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in emigration and mortality affect optimal management of deer populations
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Large Animal Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 415:633-7. 2002
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Fluctuating asymmetry in a secondary sexual trait: no associations with individual fitness, environmental stress or inbreeding, and no heritability
    L E B Kruuk
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Evol Biol 16:101-13. 2003
    ..Given the series of null results in our other tests, it seems likely that this was a direct mechanistic effect rather than because measures of FA were indicative of individual quality or condition...
  38. ncbi request reprint Estimating selection on neonatal traits in red deer using elasticity path analysis
    T Coulson
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Evolution 57:2879-92. 2003
    ....
  39. ncbi request reprint Why large-scale climate indices seem to predict ecological processes better than local weather
    T B Hallett
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 430:71-5. 2004
    ....
  40. ncbi request reprint Dispersal, eviction, and conflict in meerkats (Suricata suricatta): an evolutionarily stable strategy model
    P A Stephens
    Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, P O Box 3166, Laramie, Wyoming 82071, USA
    Am Nat 165:120-35. 2005
    ..Our model is computationally intensive but provides a general framework for incorporating future changes in the size of multimember cooperative breeding groups...
  41. ncbi request reprint Rapidly declining fine-scale spatial genetic structure in female red deer
    D H Nussey
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, EH9 3JT, UK
    Mol Ecol 14:3395-405. 2005
    ..We argue that both increasing female population size and decreasing polygyny could explain the decline in female population genetic structure...
  42. pmc Environmental coupling of selection and heritability limits evolution
    A J Wilson
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    PLoS Biol 4:e216. 2006
    ..Assumptions of environmental constancy are likely to be violated in natural systems, and failure to acknowledge this may generate highly misleading expectations for phenotypic microevolution...
  43. ncbi request reprint Estimating the functional form for the density dependence from life history data
    T Coulson
    Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park, Ascot, Berkshire, United Kingdom
    Ecology 89:1661-74. 2008
    ..The simple method we develop has potential to provide substantial insight into the relative contributions of population and individual-level processes to the dynamics of populations in stochastic environments...
  44. pmc Paternity loss in contrasting mammalian societies
    T H Clutton-Brock
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Biol Lett 2:513-6. 2006
    ..Recent genetic analyses show that, in social mammals, loss of paternity by breeding males varies with strategies of mate guarding rather than with the degree of polygyny...
  45. pmc Helpers increase the reproductive potential of offspring in cooperative meerkats
    A F Russell
    Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:513-20. 2007
    ....
  46. pmc Estimating the prevalence of inbreeding from incomplete pedigrees
    T C Marshall
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:1533-9. 2002
    ..Close and moderate inbreeding appear to be a routine part of breeding behaviour in these ruminant populations...
  47. ncbi request reprint Longitudinal gonadal steroid excretion in free-living male and female meerkats (Suricata suricatta)
    A M Moss
    Conservation and Research Center, Smithsonian Institution, Front Royal, Virginia 22630, USA
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 122:158-71. 2001
    ..The consistency in androgen excretion among male meerkats indicated that reproductive suppression may be mediated by behavioral (i.e., intermale aggression) rather than physiological (i.e., depressed spermatogenesis) mechanisms...