Richard W Byrne

Summary

Affiliation: University of St Andrews
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Dispatch. Animal communication: what makes a dog able to understand its master?
    Richard W Byrne
    School of Psychology, The University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9JU, Scotland, UK
    Curr Biol 13:R347-8. 2003
  2. pmc Gestural communication of the gorilla (Gorilla gorilla): repertoire, intentionality and possible origins
    Emilie Genty
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 12:527-46. 2009
  3. pmc Able-bodied wild chimpanzees imitate a motor procedure used by a disabled individual to overcome handicap
    Catherine Hobaiter
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e11959. 2010
  4. pmc Why do African elephants (Loxodonta africana) simulate oestrus? An analysis of longitudinal data
    Lucy A Bates
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e10052. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint Learning by imitation: a hierarchical approach
    R W Byrne
    Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
    Behav Brain Sci 21:667-84; discussion 684-721. 1998
  6. ncbi request reprint Ape society: trading favours
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, UK
    Curr Biol 17:R775-6. 2007
  7. pmc Culture in great apes: using intricate complexity in feeding skills to trace the evolutionary origin of human technical prowess
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:577-85. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Brain evolution: when is a group not a group?
    Richard W Byrne
    Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland
    Curr Biol 17:R883-4. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Animal cognition: know your enemy
    Richard W Byrne
    Scottish Primate Research Group, and Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland
    Curr Biol 16:R686-8. 2006
  10. doi request reprint Selfish DNA: homing endonucleases find a home
    David R Edgell
    Department of Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
    Curr Biol 19:R115-7. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications43

  1. ncbi request reprint Dispatch. Animal communication: what makes a dog able to understand its master?
    Richard W Byrne
    School of Psychology, The University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9JU, Scotland, UK
    Curr Biol 13:R347-8. 2003
    ..Recent evidence suggests this comes from domestication rather than wolf behaviour, perhaps involving something as simple as a change in natural looking behaviour...
  2. pmc Gestural communication of the gorilla (Gorilla gorilla): repertoire, intentionality and possible origins
    Emilie Genty
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 12:527-46. 2009
    ..Gorilla gestures are not, however, inflexible signals but are employed for intentional communication to specific individuals...
  3. pmc Able-bodied wild chimpanzees imitate a motor procedure used by a disabled individual to overcome handicap
    Catherine Hobaiter
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e11959. 2010
    ..The motivation for able-bodied chimpanzees copying his variant is unknown, but the fact that they do is evidence that the imitative learning of motor procedures from others is a natural trait of wild chimpanzees...
  4. pmc Why do African elephants (Loxodonta africana) simulate oestrus? An analysis of longitudinal data
    Lucy A Bates
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e10052. 2010
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Learning by imitation: a hierarchical approach
    R W Byrne
    Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
    Behav Brain Sci 21:667-84; discussion 684-721. 1998
    ..Action level imitation is seldom observed in great ape skill learning, and may have a largely social role, even in humans...
  6. ncbi request reprint Ape society: trading favours
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, UK
    Curr Biol 17:R775-6. 2007
    ..Although ubiquitous among humans and apparently rare among animals, exchange of one currency for another -- in this case sex for power -- may not be cognitively demanding...
  7. pmc Culture in great apes: using intricate complexity in feeding skills to trace the evolutionary origin of human technical prowess
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:577-85. 2007
    ..In contrast, social learning is unlikely to be responsible for local stylistic differences, which are apt to reflect sensitive adaptations to ecology...
  8. ncbi request reprint Brain evolution: when is a group not a group?
    Richard W Byrne
    Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland
    Curr Biol 17:R883-4. 2007
    ..Recent work suggests that this measure is too crude to apply to a wide range of species, and biologists may need to develop other ways of extending these analyses...
  9. ncbi request reprint Animal cognition: know your enemy
    Richard W Byrne
    Scottish Primate Research Group, and Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland
    Curr Biol 16:R686-8. 2006
    ..This raises the question of whether abilities like 'theory of mind' have arisen independently more than once in evolution...
  10. doi request reprint Selfish DNA: homing endonucleases find a home
    David R Edgell
    Department of Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
    Curr Biol 19:R115-7. 2009
    ..Recent work has revealed that a shared characteristic of both introns and endonucleases, the targeting of conserved sequences, may provide the impetus for the evolution of composite mobile genetic elements...
  11. ncbi request reprint Sociality, evolution and cognition
    Richard W Byrne
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Scotland
    Curr Biol 17:R714-23. 2007
    ....
  12. doi request reprint Primate social cognition: uniquely primate, uniquely social, or just unique?
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9JP, Scotland, UK
    Neuron 65:815-30. 2010
    ..The ability of great apes to learn new manual routines by parsing action components may have driven their qualitatively greater social skill, suggesting that strict partition of physical and social cognition is likely to be misleading...
  13. ncbi request reprint Understanding culture across species
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9JU, UK
    Trends Cogn Sci 8:341-6. 2004
    ..Exploring six views of culture, this article highlights the fundamental contrast of whether culture evolves as a by-product of cumulative change in cognitive mechanisms, or whether it is actively selected for its advantages...
  14. pmc Neocortex size predicts deception rate in primates
    Richard W Byrne
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JU, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:1693-9. 2004
    ..Complex social manipulations such as deception are thought to be based upon rapid learning and extensive social knowledge; thus, learning in social contexts may be constrained by neocortical size...
  15. doi request reprint Local traditions in gorilla manual skill: evidence for observational learning of behavioral organization
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 14:683-93. 2011
    ....
  16. pmc African elephants have expectations about the locations of out-of-sight family members
    Lucy A Bates
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, UK
    Biol Lett 4:34-6. 2008
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Creative or created: using anecdotes to investigate animal cognition
    Lucy A Bates
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9JU Scotland, UK
    Methods 42:12-21. 2007
    ..The aim is both to chart the creative cognitive capacities of this species, and to devise appropriate experimental methods to confirm and extend previous findings...
  18. doi request reprint How do wild baboons (Papio ursinus) plan their routes? Travel among multiple high-quality food sources with inter-group competition
    Rahel Noser
    Scottish Primate Research Group, Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 13:145-55. 2010
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Elephants classify human ethnic groups by odor and garment color
    Lucy A Bates
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9JP, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 17:1938-42. 2007
    ..Elephants are therefore able to classify members of a single species into subgroups that pose different degrees of danger...
  20. ncbi request reprint Why are animals cognitive?
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland
    Curr Biol 16:R445-8. 2006
  21. doi request reprint Why do gorillas make sequences of gestures?
    Emilie Genty
    Scottish Primate Research Group, Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 13:287-301. 2010
    ..Gesture sequences allow continual adjustment of the tempo and nature of social interactions, rather than generally conveying semantically referential information or syntactic structures...
  22. ncbi request reprint Social cognition: imitation, imitation, imitation
    Richard W Byrne
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Scotland
    Curr Biol 15:R498-500. 2005
    ..These facts make sense if imitation is seen as two different capacities: social mirroring, when actions are matched and have social benefits; and learning by copying, when new behavioural routines are acquired by observation...
  23. doi request reprint Elephant cognition
    Lucy A Bates
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 8PL, Scotland, UK
    Curr Biol 18:R544-6. 2008
  24. ncbi request reprint Mental maps in chacma baboons (Papio ursinus): using inter-group encounters as a natural experiment
    Rahel Noser
    Scottish Primate Research Group and Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, The University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 10:331-40. 2007
    ..We discuss these findings in the light of time and energy costs and suggest that the baboons lack the ability to compute Euclidean relations among locations, but use network maps to find their way to out-of-sight locations...
  25. doi request reprint Gaze following and gaze priming in lemurs
    April Ruiz
    Scottish Primate Research Group and Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, UK
    Anim Cogn 12:427-34. 2009
    ..We propose a candidate system for the evolutionary origins of more complex gaze following: 'gaze priming.'..
  26. ncbi request reprint Animal evolution: foxy friends
    Richard W Byrne
    Scottish Primate Research Group, and Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland UK
    Curr Biol 15:R86-7. 2005
    ..Red foxes that have been selected since 1959 for tameness to humans show some of the sociocognitive abilities of domestic dogs, raising questions for theories of the evolution of cognition...
  27. doi request reprint The gestural repertoire of the wild chimpanzee
    Catherine Hobaiter
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 14:745-67. 2011
    ..g. silent gestures for attentive targets, contact gestures for inattentive ones). Such highly intentional use of a species-typical repertoire raises intriguing questions for the evolution of advanced communication...
  28. doi request reprint Triadic and collaborative play by gorillas in social games with objects
    Joanne E Tanner
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 13:591-607. 2010
    ..Collaborative games may occur later in the ontogeny of gorillas than in humans, and depend on the challenges and artifacts available in a particular group's habitat...
  29. ncbi request reprint Social cognition
    Klaus Zuberbuhler
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland
    Curr Biol 16:R786-90. 2006
  30. pmc Evolutionary origins of human handedness: evaluating contrasting hypotheses
    Hélène Cochet
    Scottish Primate Research Group, Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Mary Squad, South Street, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9JP, UK
    Anim Cogn 16:531-42. 2013
    ..Fully testing these hypotheses will require developmental and evolutionary evidence as well as modern neuroimaging data...
  31. ncbi request reprint Orangutans modify their gestural signaling according to their audience's comprehension
    Erica A Cartmill
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland
    Curr Biol 17:1345-8. 2007
    ..In the absence of conventional labels, communicating the fact that an intention has been somewhat misunderstood is an important way to establish shared meaning...
  32. doi request reprint Titi monkey call sequences vary with predator location and type
    Cristiane Cäsar
    School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, UK
    Biol Lett 9:20130535. 2013
    ..This is the first demonstration of a sequence-based alarm call system in a non-human animal that has the capacity to encode both location and type of predatory threat. ..
  33. doi request reprint Laterality in the gestural communication of wild chimpanzees
    Catherine Hobaiter
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1288:9-16. 2013
    ..While the gestural repertoire as a whole was largely employed ambilateraly, object-manipulation gestures showed a strong right-hand bias...
  34. doi request reprint Serial gesturing by wild chimpanzees: its nature and function for communication
    Catherine Hobaiter
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, UK
    Anim Cogn 14:827-38. 2011
    ..This 'Repertoire Tuning' hypothesis explains a number of results previously reported from chimpanzee gesturing...
  35. ncbi request reprint Animal cognition: bring me my spear
    Richard W Byrne
    Scottish Primate Research Group, and Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, Scotland
    Curr Biol 17:R164-5. 2007
    ..Chimpanzees regularly hunt mammals, but use only their hands and teeth: for the first time, chimpanzees have now been found to make tools in order to spear mammalian prey...
  36. doi request reprint Visual laterality in the domestic horse (Equus caballus) interacting with humans
    Kate Farmer
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 13:229-38. 2010
    ..We believe these results have important practical implications and that emotional laterality should be taken into account in training methods...
  37. doi request reprint Semantics of primate gestures: intentional meanings of orangutan gestures
    Erica A Cartmill
    Scottish Primate Research Group and Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JP, UK
    Anim Cogn 13:793-804. 2010
    ..We suggest that, despite their contextual flexibility, orangutan gestures are made with the expectation of specific behavioural responses and thus have intentional meanings as well as functional consequences...
  38. ncbi request reprint Sex difference in chimpanzee handedness
    Nadia Corp
    Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JU, Scotland, UK
    Am J Phys Anthropol 123:62-8. 2004
    ....
  39. doi request reprint Deictic gesturing in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)? Some possible cases
    Catherine Hobaiter
    Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution and Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews
    J Comp Psychol 128:82-7. 2014
    ..The authors discuss the possible reasons why chimpanzees, if they possess a capacity for referential pointing, do not use it more frequently...
  40. ncbi request reprint Primates take weather into account when searching for fruits
    Karline R L Janmaat
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9JP, Scotland, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 16:1232-7. 2006
    ..We concluded that these nonhuman primates were capable of taking into account past weather conditions when searching for food. We discuss the implication of these findings for theories of primate cognitive evolution...
  41. ncbi request reprint Spider monkey ranging patterns in Mexican subtropical forest: do travel routes reflect planning?
    Alejandra Valero
    Scottish Primate Research Group and Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
    Anim Cogn 10:305-15. 2007
    ..Together, these findings suggest that while moving between feeding sites, spider monkeys use spatial memory to guide travel, and even plan more than one resource site in advance...
  42. pmc Imitation as behaviour parsing
    R W Byrne
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9JU, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 358:529-36. 2003
    ..Thus, imitation of complex, novel behaviour may not require mentalizing, but conversely behaviour parsing may be a necessary preliminary to attributing intention and cause...
  43. ncbi request reprint Reproducing human actions and action sequences: "Do as I Do!" in a dog
    József Topál
    Comparative Ethology Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Pázmány, P 1 c H 1117, Hungary
    Anim Cogn 9:355-67. 2006
    ..This suggests that dogs might acquire abilities by observation that enhance their success in complex socio-behavioural situations...