Jeffrey M Brunstrom

Summary

Affiliation: University of Bristol
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint The control of meal size in human subjects: a role for expected satiety, expected satiation and premeal planning
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Proc Nutr Soc 70:155-61. 2011
  2. pmc Episodic memory and appetite regulation in humans
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e50707. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint Flavour-flavour learning occurs automatically and only in hungry participants
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU, England, United Kingdom
    Physiol Behav 93:13-9. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint Estimating everyday portion size using a 'method of constant stimuli': in a student sample, portion size is predicted by gender, dietary behaviour, and hunger, but not BMI
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Appetite 51:296-301. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Measuring 'expected satiety' in a range of common foods using a method of constant stimuli
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, England, United Kingdom
    Appetite 51:604-14. 2008
  6. doi request reprint Measuring affective (liking) and non-affective (expected satiety) determinants of portion size and food reward
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, United Kingdom
    Appetite 52:108-14. 2009
  7. doi request reprint How many calories are on our plate? Expected fullness, not liking, determines meal-size selection
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 17:1884-90. 2009
  8. ncbi request reprint Familiarity changes expectations about fullness
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, England, UK
    Appetite 54:587-90. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Perceived volume, expected satiation, and the energy content of self-selected meals
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    University of Bristol, England, UK
    Appetite 55:25-9. 2010
  10. doi request reprint 'Expected satiety' changes hunger and fullness in the inter-meal interval
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, United Kingdom
    Appetite 56:310-5. 2011

Detail Information

Publications33

  1. doi request reprint The control of meal size in human subjects: a role for expected satiety, expected satiation and premeal planning
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Proc Nutr Soc 70:155-61. 2011
    ..Since most meals are eaten in their entirety, understanding the nature of these controls should be given high priority...
  2. pmc Episodic memory and appetite regulation in humans
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e50707. 2012
    ..For the first time, this manipulation exposes the independent and important contribution of memory processes to satiety. Opportunities exist to capitalise on this finding to reduce energy intake in humans...
  3. ncbi request reprint Flavour-flavour learning occurs automatically and only in hungry participants
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU, England, United Kingdom
    Physiol Behav 93:13-9. 2008
    ..Learning was not predicted by dietary restraint (measured using the DEBQ-R scale). Together, these findings provide further evidence for a linkage between flavour-flavour learning and flavour-nutrient learning...
  4. ncbi request reprint Estimating everyday portion size using a 'method of constant stimuli': in a student sample, portion size is predicted by gender, dietary behaviour, and hunger, but not BMI
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Appetite 51:296-301. 2008
    ..In particular, we suggest that the difference in total energy expenditure of individuals with a higher and lower BMI is too small to be detected as a concomitant difference in portion size (at least in our sample)...
  5. ncbi request reprint Measuring 'expected satiety' in a range of common foods using a method of constant stimuli
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, England, United Kingdom
    Appetite 51:604-14. 2008
    ..Future use of this methodology is discussed, both in relation to our understanding of portion-size decisions and its application more generally...
  6. doi request reprint Measuring affective (liking) and non-affective (expected satiety) determinants of portion size and food reward
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, United Kingdom
    Appetite 52:108-14. 2009
    ..Together, our findings confirm the importance of expected satiety and they demonstrate the quantification of separate affective and non-affective determinants of food reward and portion size...
  7. doi request reprint How many calories are on our plate? Expected fullness, not liking, determines meal-size selection
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Obesity (Silver Spring) 17:1884-90. 2009
    ..Together, these findings challenge the role of palatability in meal-size selection and they highlight the importance of expected satiation, a "nonaffective" component of food reward...
  8. ncbi request reprint Familiarity changes expectations about fullness
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, England, UK
    Appetite 54:587-90. 2010
    ..Together, these findings are considered in the context of 'satiation drift' - the hypothesis that foods are expected to deliver poor satiation until experience teaches us otherwise...
  9. doi request reprint Perceived volume, expected satiation, and the energy content of self-selected meals
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    University of Bristol, England, UK
    Appetite 55:25-9. 2010
    ..8%) can be considered 'unique' and independent of the perceived physical dimensions of the foods. We suspect that this contribution reflects the effect of prior learning, based on actual satiation that has been experienced in the past...
  10. doi request reprint 'Expected satiety' changes hunger and fullness in the inter-meal interval
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, United Kingdom
    Appetite 56:310-5. 2011
    ..Potential explanations are discussed, including the prospect that satiety is moderated by memories of expected satiety that are encoded around the time that a meal is consumed...
  11. ncbi request reprint Associative learning and the control of human dietary behavior
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU, UK
    Appetite 49:268-71. 2007
    ..The second section briefly considers the effect of learning on meal size, and the author revisits the question of how learned associations might come to influence energy intake in humans...
  12. ncbi request reprint Flavor-nutrient learning in restrained and unrestrained eaters
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU, England, UK
    Physiol Behav 90:133-41. 2007
    ..These data provide further evidence for flavor-nutrient learning in adults and they highlight a hitherto unexplored and potentially important difference between restrained and unrestrained eaters...
  13. ncbi request reprint Dietary learning in humans: directions for future research
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, BS8 1TN, England, United Kingdom
    Physiol Behav 85:57-65. 2005
    ..More generally, an analysis of this kind is important because it has the potential to explain differences that might underpin particular aberrant eating habits...
  14. ncbi request reprint Dietary restraint and US devaluation predict evaluative learning
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TN, England
    Physiol Behav 85:524-35. 2005
    ..Evidence that a sweet US can bring about a decrease in liking has not been reported previously. One interpretation is that negative beliefs and attitudes can contaminate the representation of the US during training...
  15. ncbi request reprint Dietary restraint and cognitive performance in children
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, UK
    Appetite 45:235-41. 2005
    ..We discuss reasons why restraint and performance might be related causally and we conclude that this issue warrants further scrutiny...
  16. ncbi request reprint Effects of distraction on the development of satiety
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Br J Nutr 96:761-9. 2006
    ..More generally, this kind of phenomenon warrants further scrutiny because it holds the potential to contribute towards overeating, either by prolonging an eating episode or by reducing the interval between meals...
  17. doi request reprint Computer-based assessments of expected satiety predict behavioural measures of portion-size selection and food intake
    Laura L Wilkinson
    Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Appetite 59:933-8. 2012
    ..Of these, 29.6% consumed more when prompted by the experimenter. Together, these findings further validate the use of screen-based measures to explore determinants of portion-size selection and energy intake in humans...
  18. doi request reprint The 'variety effect' is anticipated in meal planning
    Laura L Wilkinson
    Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU, UK
    Appetite 60:175-9. 2013
    ..This work shows that effects of variety are learned and anticipated. This extends our characterisation beyond a passive process that develops towards the end of a meal...
  19. doi request reprint What determines real-world meal size? Evidence for pre-meal planning
    Stephanie H Fay
    School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU England, UK
    Appetite 56:284-9. 2011
    ..Logistic regression confirmed pre-meal planning as the most important predictor of consumption. Together, our findings demonstrate the importance of meal planning as a key determinant of meal size and energy intake...
  20. doi request reprint Dopamine and food reward: effects of acute tyrosine/phenylalanine depletion on appetite
    Charlotte A Hardman
    School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU, UK
    Physiol Behav 105:1202-7. 2012
    ..In conclusion, we found no evidence for compensatory eating following ATPD. Our results also provide support for the role of dopamine in motivational components of eating...
  21. doi request reprint Conditioning 'fullness expectations' in a novel dessert
    Laura L Wilkinson
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, England, United Kingdom
    Appetite 52:780-3. 2009
    ..Expected satiation did increase but only in the high energy-dense condition (17.4%). This difference was not reflected in a measure of intake...
  22. ncbi request reprint Effects of repeated exposure on liking for a reduced-energy-dense food
    Hayley L O'Sullivan
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, United Kingdom
    Am J Clin Nutr 91:1584-9. 2010
    ..However, the extent to which attitudes toward a reduced-energy-dense food remain constant, even after repeated ingestion, remains to be explored systematically...
  23. doi request reprint The role of sensitivity to reward and impulsivity in food-cue reactivity
    Amanda C Tetley
    School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, England, LE11 3TU, UK
    Eat Behav 11:138-43. 2010
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Does dietary learning occur outside awareness?
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, England, UK
    Conscious Cogn 13:453-70. 2004
    ..Since most food preferences are learned, asking questions about awareness can also tell us something fundamental about everyday dietary control...
  25. doi request reprint How does food-cue exposure lead to larger meal sizes?
    Danielle Ferriday
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, UK
    Br J Nutr 100:1325-32. 2008
    ..Finally, we found evidence that restrained eaters are less 'cue reactive' than unrestrained eaters. In future, our approach might be adapted to consider whether heightened 'cue reactivity' represents a risk factor for obesity...
  26. doi request reprint Increased familiarity with eating a food to fullness underlies increased expected satiety
    Michael A Irvine
    School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU, England, United Kingdom
    Appetite 61:13-8. 2013
    ..Together, these findings indicate that expected satiety changes in response to increased familiarity of eating a food to satiety...
  27. doi request reprint Playing a computer game during lunch affects fullness, memory for lunch, and later snack intake
    Rose E Oldham-Cooper
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
    Am J Clin Nutr 93:308-13. 2011
    ..The presence of distracting stimuli during eating increases the meal size and could thereby contribute to overeating and obesity. However, the effects of within-meal distraction on later food intake are less clear...
  28. ncbi request reprint Everyday dietary behaviour and the relationship between attention and meal size
    Gemma L Mitchell
    Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, England
    Appetite 45:344-55. 2005
    ..In relation to this idea, we discuss the possibility that some individuals choose to avoid food-related cognition by engaging strategically with other aspects of their cognitive environment...
  29. ncbi request reprint Automatic and nonautomatic processes in dietary restraint: further evidence for a commonality between food and drug abstinence
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU Leicestershire, UK
    Eat Behav 5:365-73. 2004
    ..The merits of conceptualising dietary restraint in terms of automatic and nonautomatic processes are discussed, together with suggestions for future research...
  30. doi request reprint Children's familiarity with snack foods changes expectations about fullness
    Charlotte A Hardman
    Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, United Kingdom
    Am J Clin Nutr 94:1196-201. 2011
    ..In adults, there is emerging evidence that expectations about the satiating properties of foods are an important determinant of meal size, and these beliefs are learned...
  31. ncbi request reprint Dietary restraint and heightened reactivity to food
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
    Physiol Behav 81:85-90. 2004
    ..This does not appear to be related to reported levels of hunger before lunch. Rather, it may reveal an intrinsic difference between the reaction of restrained and unrestrained eaters to food...
  32. ncbi request reprint Effects of mouth dryness on drinking behavior and beverage acceptability
    Jeffrey M Brunstrom
    Department of Human Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
    Physiol Behav 76:423-9. 2002
    ..However, if a common underlying process exists, then this may help to elucidate reasons for voluntary dehydration and aberrant drinking behavior in the elderly...
  33. ncbi request reprint Spectral pattern, harmonic relations, and the perceptual grouping of low-numbered components
    Brian Roberts
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, England
    J Acoust Soc Am 114:2118-34. 2003
    ..Together, these results indicate that the lowest component of a shifted complex is grouped by local harmonicity, whereas the higher components are grouped by common spectral spacing. Global pitch did not influence component grouping...