John Fy Brookfield

Summary

Affiliation: University of Nottingham
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Genetic redundancy: screening for selection in yeast
    J F Brookfield
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK
    Curr Biol 7:R366-8. 1997
  2. ncbi request reprint A simple method for genome-wide screening for advantageous insertions of mobile DNAs in Escherichia coli
    Richard J Edwards
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, NG7 2UH, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 12:863-7. 2002
  3. doi request reprint Quantitative genetics: heritability is not always missing
    John F Y Brookfield
    Centre for Genetics and Genomics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
    Curr Biol 23:R276-8. 2013
  4. pmc Investigation of the origin and spread of a Mammalian transposable element based on current sequence diversity
    Elizabeth H B Hellen
    Centre for Genetics and Genomics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, UK
    J Mol Evol 73:287-96. 2011
  5. pmc Analysis of the features and source gene composition of the AluYg6 subfamily of human retrotransposons
    Pamela Styles
    Institute of Genetics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 7:102. 2007
  6. pmc Source gene composition and gene conversion of the AluYh and AluYi lineages of retrotransposons
    Pamela Styles
    Institute of Genetics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 9:102. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint The ecology of the genome - mobile DNA elements and their hosts
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
    Nat Rev Genet 6:128-36. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary forces generating sequence homogeneity and heterogeneity within retrotransposon families
    J F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Cytogenet Genome Res 110:383-91. 2005
  9. pmc The evolution of mobile DNAs: when will transposons create phylogenies that look as if there is a master gene?
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK
    Genetics 173:1115-23. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint What determines the rate of sequence evolution?
    J F Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK
    Curr Biol 10:R410-R0411. 2000

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications43

  1. ncbi request reprint Genetic redundancy: screening for selection in yeast
    J F Brookfield
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK
    Curr Biol 7:R366-8. 1997
    ..An ingenious new approach using yeast allows all genes to be screened simultaneously for the presence of weak selection against lack-of-function mutations...
  2. ncbi request reprint A simple method for genome-wide screening for advantageous insertions of mobile DNAs in Escherichia coli
    Richard J Edwards
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, NG7 2UH, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 12:863-7. 2002
    ..It allows investigation of the extent to which transient mutations generating environment-dependent selective advantages may help to explain the persistence of mobile DNAs in primarily clonal organisms, such as E. coli...
  3. doi request reprint Quantitative genetics: heritability is not always missing
    John F Y Brookfield
    Centre for Genetics and Genomics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
    Curr Biol 23:R276-8. 2013
    ..A new yeast study has identified QTLs which explain most heritability in traits. Why is heritability missing in human diseases but not here?..
  4. pmc Investigation of the origin and spread of a Mammalian transposable element based on current sequence diversity
    Elizabeth H B Hellen
    Centre for Genetics and Genomics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, UK
    J Mol Evol 73:287-96. 2011
    ..However, in this analysis, molecular dating, commonly used for determining the age of gene sequences, has been used, reducing the likelihood of errors from deleted lineages...
  5. pmc Analysis of the features and source gene composition of the AluYg6 subfamily of human retrotransposons
    Pamela Styles
    Institute of Genetics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 7:102. 2007
    ..To investigate the evolution of young Alu elements it is critical to have access to complete subfamilies, which, following the release of the final human genome assembly, can now be obtained using in silico methods...
  6. pmc Source gene composition and gene conversion of the AluYh and AluYi lineages of retrotransposons
    Pamela Styles
    Institute of Genetics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 9:102. 2009
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint The ecology of the genome - mobile DNA elements and their hosts
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
    Nat Rev Genet 6:128-36. 2005
    ..Unlike ecological communities, however, the slow rates at which genomes change allow us to reconstruct patterns of interaction that stretch back tens or hundreds of millions of years...
  8. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary forces generating sequence homogeneity and heterogeneity within retrotransposon families
    J F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Cytogenet Genome Res 110:383-91. 2005
    ..In addition, I consider the question of the interaction between retrotransposons and their hosts, and the causes of the abundance of transposable elements in the genomes that they occupy...
  9. pmc The evolution of mobile DNAs: when will transposons create phylogenies that look as if there is a master gene?
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK
    Genetics 173:1115-23. 2006
    ..Such tree shapes are therefore not conclusive evidence for a single source of transposition...
  10. ncbi request reprint What determines the rate of sequence evolution?
    J F Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK
    Curr Biol 10:R410-R0411. 2000
    ..However, two recent studies have shown that rapid evolution of amino-acid sequence can also be congruent with neutrality...
  11. pmc Evolution and evolvability: celebrating Darwin 200
    John F Y Brookfield
    School of Biology, Institute of Genetics, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
    Biol Lett 5:44-6. 2009
    ..Perhaps the most potentially confusing aspects of the concept of evolvability are seen in the relationship between evolvability and robustness...
  12. doi request reprint Experimental evolution: the rate of adaptive evolution
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 3RD, UK
    Curr Biol 20:R23-5. 2010
    ..This permits the elucidation of the molecular evolutionary dynamics in these populations...
  13. pmc Host-parasite relationships in the genome
    John F Y Brookfield
    School of Biology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK
    BMC Biol 9:67. 2011
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint The molecular basis of instability of the singed(very weak) mutation in Drosophila melanogaster
    C A Ortori
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, UK
    Genet Res 63:19-26. 1994
    ..By PCR amplification of dissected thoraces we show that the somatic instability of the mutation, from a weak to a strong singed phenotype, is also caused by the excision of the smaller of the two elements...
  15. ncbi request reprint Population genetics: the signature of selection
    J F Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, NG7 2UH, Nottingham, UK
    Curr Biol 11:R388-90. 2001
    ..New work on Drosophila genes that seem to have been subject to adaptive changes illustrates the difficulties in calculating the statistical significance of data trends that seem to show this...
  16. ncbi request reprint Genomic sequencing: the complexity conundrum
    J F Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK
    Curr Biol 10:R514-5. 2000
    ..The recent finding that Drosophila melanogaster has more than four thousand fewer genes than the nematode forces a re-examination of whether gene number, in itself, can be taken as any real guide to complexity...
  17. ncbi request reprint A test for adaptive change in DNA sequences controlling transcription
    D L Jenkins
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, U K
    Proc Biol Sci 261:203-7. 1995
    ..This is despite highly significant evidence that all parts of the sequence have been subject to strong selective constraint). The test can be applied generally to investigate adaptive evolution in the control of gene expression...
  18. ncbi request reprint Evolution: the evolvability enigma
    J F Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, NG7 2UH, Nottingham, UK
    Curr Biol 11:R106-8. 2001
    ..To what extent should processes of gene expression and control be interpreted in terms of their capacity to allow future evolution as well as present adaptation?..
  19. pmc What is the impact of transposable elements on host genome variability?
    P T Emery
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queen s Medical Centre, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 266:1677-83. 1999
    ..This might be explained by multiple insertions or through a selection for recombination analogous to that seen in 'hitchhiking'...
  20. ncbi request reprint A novel repressor of P element transposition in Drosophila melanogaster
    R M Badge
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queen s Medical Centre, UK
    Genet Res 71:21-30. 1998
    ..The chromosome has 17 P elements, none full-length, located in at least 12 dispersed positions...
  21. ncbi request reprint Genetic evidence for repression of somatic P element movements in Drosophila melanogaster consistent with a role for the KP element
    J F Brookfield
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, U K
    Heredity (Edinb) 76:384-91. 1996
    ..The cause of this effect may be related to transcription of the KP element in snvw. However, an effect of other genomic P elements in the repression of somatic reversion of snvw cannot be entirely excluded...
  22. ncbi request reprint Neutralism and selectionism face up to DNA data
    J F Brookfield
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, UK
    Trends Genet 10:109-11. 1994
  23. ncbi request reprint Molecular evolution. Retroposon revivals
    J F Brookfield
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, UK
    Curr Biol 5:255-6. 1995
    ..Phylogenetic studies of the mouse L1 retroposon family show that the elements evolve through successively active subfamilies, which differ from each other by complete replacements of their promoter sequences...
  24. ncbi request reprint Evidence for a Wolbachia symbiont in Drosophila melanogaster
    P R Holden
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, England
    Genet Res 62:23-9. 1993
    ..In a series of reciprocal crosses no evidence was found that the symbiont causes cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) which is known to occur in infected strains of D. simulans. The implications of these findings are discussed...
  25. ncbi request reprint Cloning and characterization of an ftsZ homologue from a bacterial symbiont of Drosophila melanogaster
    P R Holden
    Department of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, England
    Mol Gen Genet 240:213-20. 1993
    ..The consequences of this function particularly with respect to its role in cell division are discussed...
  26. ncbi request reprint An investigation of the cause of low variability on the fourth chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster
    M Carr
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 18:2260-9. 2001
    ..12N) generations ago. Our results show no homoplasies and are thus consistent with no recombination occurring on the chromosome. The difficulties of distinguishing between the models using polymorphism data are discussed...
  27. ncbi request reprint The interaction between mobile DNAs and their hosts in a fluctuating environment
    James E McGraw
    Institute of Genetics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
    J Theor Biol 243:13-23. 2006
    ..We consider the possible biological predictions of this analysis...
  28. ncbi request reprint A test of the master gene hypothesis for interspersed repetitive DNA sequences
    Louise J Johnson
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 23:235-9. 2006
    ..We suggest that a single master gene is rarely, if ever, likely to be responsible for the accumulation of any repeat family...
  29. ncbi request reprint Transiently beneficial insertions could maintain mobile DNA sequences in variable environments
    Richard J Edwards
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 20:30-7. 2003
    ..In finite populations, effective population sizes are greatly reduced by selective sweeps, and mean copy number can be increased as the reduced variance in copy number results in reduced selection...
  30. ncbi request reprint Evolution of developmental genes: molecular microevolution of enhancer sequences at the Ubx locus in Drosophila and its impact on developmental phenotypes
    Jaros Phinchongsakuldit
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 21:348-63. 2004
    ..Estimated phylogenetic trees have been constructed for the three enhancer regions investigated. Neither of the two phenotypic traits investigated shows any significant associations with the phylogeny of any of the three enhancers...
  31. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms regulating the copy numbers of six LTR retrotransposons in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster
    Martin Carr
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, UK
    Chromosoma 110:511-8. 2002
    ..This suggests that different retrotransposon families are regulated by different mechanisms...
  32. ncbi request reprint The Drosophila melanogaster Ku70 coding sequence is wild-type in mus309 mutants
    Helen R Nicholas
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, UK
    Genetica 114:293-6. 2002
    ..However, recent work has suggested that these mutations are in the Bloom's syndrome homologue. Here, we demonstrate that the coding sequence of Ku70 gene is indeed wild-type in two mus309 mutant lines...
  33. pmc Foci of endemic simian immunodeficiency virus infection in wild-living eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)
    Mario L Santiago
    Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA
    J Virol 77:7545-62. 2003
    ..The basis for the wide variability in SIVcpz infection rates in east African apes and the important question of SIVcpz prevalence in west central African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) remain to be elucidated...
  34. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary modelling of feed forward loops in gene regulatory networks
    Max B Cooper
    Institute of Genetics, School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, United Kingdom
    Biosystems 91:231-44. 2008
    ..The very high likelihood ratios generated, of over 10(11), suggest that evolutionary simulation is a valuable component in the explanation of FFL structure...
  35. ncbi request reprint Human prehistory: the message from linkage disequilibrium
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
    Curr Biol 13:R86-7. 2003
    ..A new way has been found by which patterns of linkage disequilibrium can be used to detect the effects of natural selection in human prehistory...
  36. ncbi request reprint Evolution of spatial expression pattern
    Louise J Johnson
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
    Evol Dev 5:593-9. 2003
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Gene duplications: the gradual evolution of functional divergence
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
    Curr Biol 13:R229-30. 2003
    ..A new analysis of the fitness effects of deletion mutations in budding yeast reveals that genes that have duplicates create lower fitness losses when inactivated than do genes that are singletons...
  38. ncbi request reprint Human evolution: a legacy of cannibalism in our genes?
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, NG7 2UH, Nottingham, UK
    Curr Biol 13:R592-3. 2003
    ..Is this a legacy of widespread cannibalism by our ancestors?..
  39. pmc Simian immunodeficiency virus infection in free-ranging sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys atys) from the Taï Forest, Côte d'Ivoire: implications for the origin of epidemic human immunodeficiency virus type 2
    Mario L Santiago
    Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
    J Virol 79:12515-27. 2005
    ....
  40. ncbi request reprint Mobile DNAs: the poacher turned gamekeeper
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, UK
    Curr Biol 13:R846-7. 2003
    ..We are now finding out more about the ways in which host sequences can enlist the help of formerly parasitic DNAs...
  41. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary genetics: Mobile DNAs as sources of adaptive change?
    John F Y Brookfield
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK
    Curr Biol 14:R344-5. 2004
    ..A new study has revealed a mobile DNA insertion in Drosophila simulans that is associated with an apparent selective sweep and an elevation in expression level of an adjacent gene which creates insecticide resistance...
  42. ncbi request reprint Expected rates and modes of evolution of enhancer sequences
    Stewart MacArthur
    Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 21:1064-73. 2004
    ..One result of this is that any incremental selective benefits that result from the relative positioning of sites have a surprisingly small impact on the final binding-site positions...
  43. pmc Chimpanzee reservoirs of pandemic and nonpandemic HIV-1
    Brandon F Keele
    Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA
    Science 313:523-6. 2006
    ..These findings establish P. t. troglodytes as a natural reservoir of HIV-1...