R A Barton

Summary

Affiliation: University of Durham
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint How did brains evolve?
    Robert A Barton
    Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Nature 415:134-5. 2002
  2. pmc Human frontal lobes are not relatively large
    Robert A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:9001-6. 2013
  3. pmc Embodied cognitive evolution and the cerebellum
    Robert A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Dawson Building, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:2097-107. 2012
  4. pmc Parasite resistance and the adaptive significance of sleep
    Brian T Preston
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    BMC Evol Biol 9:7. 2009
  5. pmc Reconstructing the ups and downs of primate brain evolution: implications for adaptive hypotheses and Homo floresiensis
    Stephen H Montgomery
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK
    BMC Biol 8:9. 2010
  6. pmc Primate brain architecture and selection in relation to sex
    Patrik Lindenfors
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    BMC Biol 5:20. 2007
  7. pmc From The Cover: Binocularity and brain evolution in primates
    R A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:10113-5. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Mosaic evolution of brain structure in mammals
    R A Barton
    Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Nature 405:1055-8. 2000
  9. pmc Maternal investment, life histories, and the costs of brain growth in mammals
    Robert A Barton
    Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:6169-74. 2011
  10. pmc Visual specialization and brain evolution in primates
    R A Barton
    Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 265:1933-7. 1998

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. ncbi request reprint How did brains evolve?
    Robert A Barton
    Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Nature 415:134-5. 2002
    ..that it could be useful for detecting evolutionary patterns and phylogenetic relationships...
  2. pmc Human frontal lobes are not relatively large
    Robert A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:9001-6. 2013
    ..The search for the neural basis of human cognitive uniqueness should therefore focus less on the frontal lobes in isolation and more on distributed neural networks...
  3. pmc Embodied cognitive evolution and the cerebellum
    Robert A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Dawson Building, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:2097-107. 2012
    ..Instead, I argue that cognitive evolution is most effectively understood as the elaboration of specialized systems for embodied adaptive control...
  4. pmc Parasite resistance and the adaptive significance of sleep
    Brian T Preston
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103, Leipzig, Germany
    BMC Evol Biol 9:7. 2009
    ..Here, we test this hypothesis by conducting comparative analyses of mammalian sleep, immune system parameters, and parasitism...
  5. pmc Reconstructing the ups and downs of primate brain evolution: implications for adaptive hypotheses and Homo floresiensis
    Stephen H Montgomery
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK
    BMC Biol 8:9. 2010
    ..We present the first systematic phylogenetic analysis designed to answer this question...
  6. pmc Primate brain architecture and selection in relation to sex
    Patrik Lindenfors
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    BMC Biol 5:20. 2007
    ....
  7. pmc From The Cover: Binocularity and brain evolution in primates
    R A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, 43 Old Elvet, Durham DH1 3HN, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:10113-5. 2004
    ..The results support the hypothesis that brain size evolution in primates was associated with visual specialization...
  8. ncbi request reprint Mosaic evolution of brain structure in mammals
    R A Barton
    Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Nature 405:1055-8. 2000
    ..This is true at the level of both basic brain subdivisions and more fine-grained functional systems. Hence, brain evolution in these groups involved complex relationships among individual brain components...
  9. pmc Maternal investment, life histories, and the costs of brain growth in mammals
    Robert A Barton
    Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:6169-74. 2011
    ..Hence, the general pattern of slower life histories in large-brained species appears to be a direct consequence of developmental costs...
  10. pmc Visual specialization and brain evolution in primates
    R A Barton
    Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 265:1933-7. 1998
    ..The separate correlation between group size and visual brain evolution, on the other hand, may indicate the visual basis of social information processing in the primate brain...
  11. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary specialization in mammalian cortical structure
    R A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Durham, UK
    J Evol Biol 20:1504-11. 2007
    ..Thus, the evolution of mammalian cortical structure was closely associated with specialization for different sensory niches...
  12. pmc Evolutionary coherence of the mammalian amygdala
    Robert A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 270:539-43. 2003
    ..This allows us to reject the strong claim that the amygdala is neither a structural nor a functional unit, and demonstrates the importance of evolutionary analysis in resolving such issues in systems neuroscience...
  13. ncbi request reprint Animal communication: do dolphins have names?
    Robert A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Durham University, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Curr Biol 16:R598-9. 2006
    ..A new study of contact calls in dolphins shows that individuals can recognize one another using information encoded in the frequency modulation pattern of these calls, in the absence of general voice characteristics...
  14. ncbi request reprint Olfactory evolution and behavioral ecology in primates
    Robert A Barton
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
    Am J Primatol 68:545-58. 2006
    ..These social system correlations support the idea that there is an olfactory dimension to the concept of the social brain...
  15. ncbi request reprint Psychology: red enhances human performance in contests
    Russell A Hill
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
    Nature 435:293. 2005
    ..These results indicate not only that sexual selection may have influenced the evolution of human response to colours, but also that the colour of sportswear needs to be taken into account to ensure a level playing field in sport...
  16. doi request reprint Placentation and maternal investment in mammals
    Isabella Capellini
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Dawson Building, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 177:86-98. 2011
    ..We suggest that the effects of placental interdigitation on growth rates and the way that these are traded off against gestation length may be promising avenues for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of parent-offspring conflict...
  17. ncbi request reprint Phylogeny and metabolic scaling in mammals
    Isabella Capellini
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Dawson Building, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom
    Ecology 91:2783-93. 2010
    ..The lack of evidence for a predominant scaling exponent in these analyses suggests that general models of metabolic scaling, and macro-ecological theories that depend on them, have little explanatory power...
  18. pmc Phylogenetic analysis of the ecology and evolution of mammalian sleep
    Isabella Capellini
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, Department of Anthropology, Durham University, DH1 3HN Durham, UK
    Evolution 62:1764-76. 2008
    ..We propose that, within this ecological framework, interspecific variation in sleep duration might be compensated by variation in the physiological intensity of sleep...
  19. pmc Does sleep play a role in memory consolidation? A comparative test
    Isabella Capellini
    Department of Anthropology, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 4:e4609. 2009
    ..These results are consistent with the hypothesis that NREM sleep is functionally linked with specializations of the amygdala, including perhaps memory processing...
  20. ncbi request reprint The evolution of the cortico-cerebellar complex in primates: anatomical connections predict patterns of correlated evolution
    B A Whiting
    Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group, University of Durham, UK
    J Hum Evol 44:3-10. 2003
    ..Furthermore, they suggest that the much discussed expansion of the primate neocortex should be re-evaluated in the light of conjoint cerebellar expansion...
  21. ncbi request reprint Parasites and the evolutionary diversification of primate clades
    Charles L Nunn
    Section of Evolution and Ecology, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA
    Am Nat 164:S90-103. 2004
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Amygdala size and hypothalamus size predict social play frequency in nonhuman primates: a comparative analysis using independent contrasts
    Kerrie P Lewis
    Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    J Comp Psychol 120:31-7. 2006
    ..Thus, the instinctive socio-emotive aspects of play in primates appear to be those regulated by the amygdala and hypothalamus...
  23. doi request reprint Red shirt colour is associated with long-term team success in English football
    Martin J Attrill
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK
    J Sports Sci 26:577-82. 2008
    ....