Dominik R Bach

Summary

Affiliation: University College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc A stable sparse fear memory trace in human amygdala
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 31:9383-9. 2011
  2. pmc The known unknowns: neural representation of second-order uncertainty, and ambiguity
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 31:4811-20. 2011
  3. pmc Automatic relevance detection in the absence of a functional amygdala
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 49:1302-5. 2011
  4. pmc Deep and superficial amygdala nuclei projections revealed in vivo by probabilistic tractography
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    J Neurosci 31:618-23. 2011
  5. doi request reprint No evidence for a negative prediction error signal in peripheral indicators of sympathetic arousal
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Neuroimage 59:883-4. 2012
  6. pmc Dynamic causal modelling of anticipatory skin conductance responses
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
    Biol Psychol 85:163-70. 2010
  7. pmc Analytic measures for quantification of arousal from spontaneous skin conductance fluctuations
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Int J Psychophysiol 76:52-5. 2010
  8. pmc Modelling event-related skin conductance responses
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Int J Psychophysiol 75:349-56. 2010
  9. pmc Evidence for impaired sound intensity processing in schizophrenia
    Dominik R Bach
    University Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    Schizophr Bull 37:426-31. 2011
  10. pmc Time-series analysis for rapid event-related skin conductance responses
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci Methods 184:224-34. 2009

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. pmc A stable sparse fear memory trace in human amygdala
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 31:9383-9. 2011
    ..A sparse neuronal representation for fear, here revealed by multivariate pattern classification, resolves why an enduring memory trace has proven elusive in previous human studies...
  2. pmc The known unknowns: neural representation of second-order uncertainty, and ambiguity
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 31:4811-20. 2011
    ..Our findings indicate that behavioral and neural responses to second-order uncertainty are distinct from those associated with ambiguity and may call for a reappraisal of previous data...
  3. pmc Automatic relevance detection in the absence of a functional amygdala
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, UK
    Neuropsychologia 49:1302-5. 2011
    ..We propose that in the absence of a functioning amygdala, prioritised visual processing may rely on alternative structures such as pulvinar and cortical visual areas...
  4. pmc Deep and superficial amygdala nuclei projections revealed in vivo by probabilistic tractography
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    J Neurosci 31:618-23. 2011
    ..We propose that connectivity profiles provide a potentially powerful approach for in vivo amygdala parcellation and can serve as a guide in studies that exploit functional and anatomical neuroimaging...
  5. doi request reprint No evidence for a negative prediction error signal in peripheral indicators of sympathetic arousal
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Neuroimage 59:883-4. 2012
    ..We discuss methodical reasons for this discrepancy and technical implications for estimation of central processes from skin conductance data...
  6. pmc Dynamic causal modelling of anticipatory skin conductance responses
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
    Biol Psychol 85:163-70. 2010
    ..The model furnishes a potentially powerful approach to characterising SCR that exploits knowledge about how these signals are generated...
  7. pmc Analytic measures for quantification of arousal from spontaneous skin conductance fluctuations
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Int J Psychophysiol 76:52-5. 2010
    ..We demonstrate the validity of this measure in relation to finite impulse response models, and show that it is a better predictor of autonomic arousal, relative to conventional measures...
  8. pmc Modelling event-related skin conductance responses
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    Int J Psychophysiol 75:349-56. 2010
    ..We develop a canonical response function and show that it can be used for signals from different recording sites. We discuss the implications of these observations for model-based analysis of SCRs...
  9. pmc Evidence for impaired sound intensity processing in schizophrenia
    Dominik R Bach
    University Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    Schizophr Bull 37:426-31. 2011
    ..We discuss how this might support the notion of a more general deficit in extracting emotional meaning from different sensory cues, including intensity and pitch...
  10. pmc Time-series analysis for rapid event-related skin conductance responses
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci Methods 184:224-34. 2009
    ..We suggest our approach provides greater flexibility in analysing SCRs than existing methods...
  11. doi request reprint Looming sounds as warning signals: the function of motion cues
    Dominik R Bach
    University Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Bern, Switzerland
    Int J Psychophysiol 74:28-33. 2009
    ..Explicit emotional appraisal of such sounds shows a strong directional asymmetry and thus may reflect their implicit warning properties...
  12. doi request reprint Altered lateralisation of emotional prosody processing in schizophrenia
    Dominik R Bach
    University Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Bern, Bolligenstrasse 111, 3000 Bern 60, Switzerland
    Schizophr Res 110:180-7. 2009
    ..Enhanced right-lateralisation to prosody resembles previous findings on laterality changes in speech processing and might suggest a common underlying cause in the organization of language functions...
  13. pmc Neural activity associated with the passive prediction of ambiguity and risk for aversive events
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 29:1648-56. 2009
    ..Our findings suggest that these regions subserve a general function of contextual analysis when search for hidden information during outcome anticipation is both necessary and meaningful...
  14. doi request reprint The effect of appraisal level on processing of emotional prosody in meaningless speech
    Dominik R Bach
    University Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Bern, Switzerland
    Neuroimage 42:919-27. 2008
    ..In addition to brain areas commonly related to prosody processing, our results suggest specific functions of anterior cingulate and basal ganglia in detecting emotional prosody, particularly when explicit identification is necessary...
  15. ncbi request reprint Rising sound intensity: an intrinsic warning cue activating the amygdala
    Dominik R Bach
    University Hospital of Psychiatry, University of Bern, 3000 Bern, Switzerland
    Cereb Cortex 18:145-50. 2008
    ..Regions involved in cross-modal integration were activated by rising sound intensity, while the right-hemisphere phasic alertness network could not be supported by this study...
  16. ncbi request reprint Dissociated lateralization of transient and sustained blood oxygen level-dependent signal components in human primary auditory cortex
    Christoph Lehmann
    University Hospital of Clinical Psychiatry, University of Bern, 3000 Bern, Switzerland
    Neuroimage 34:1637-42. 2007
    ....
  17. doi request reprint Brain responses to auditory and visual stimulus offset: shared representations of temporal edges
    Marcus Herdener
    University Hospital of Psychiatry Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    Hum Brain Mapp 30:725-33. 2009
    ..This operation is likely to facilitate cross-modal object feature binding based on temporal coincidence...
  18. pmc Deconstructing risk: separable encoding of variance and skewness in the brain
    Mkael Symmonds
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N3BG, UK
    Neuroimage 58:1139-49. 2011
    ..Our findings show that risk is neither monolithic from a behavioural nor neural perspective and its decomposition is evident both in distinct behavioural preferences and in segregated underlying brain representations...
  19. pmc Differentiable neural substrates for learned and described value and risk
    Thomas H B FitzGerald
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, 12 Queen Square, London, UK
    Curr Biol 20:1823-9. 2010
    ..Our data indicate that, during decision making under risk, both behavior and the neural encoding of key decision variables are strongly influenced by the manner in which value information is presented...
  20. pmc A regret-induced status quo bias
    Antoinette Nicolle
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 31:3320-7. 2011
    ..In line with our hypothesis, a similar pattern of signal change predicted acceptance of the status quo on a subsequent trial. Thus, our data link a regret-induced status quo bias to error-related activity on the preceding trial...
  21. pmc A role for the striatum in regret-related choice repetition
    Antoinette Nicolle
    University College London, UK
    J Cogn Neurosci 23:845-56. 2011
    ..Our findings indicate that regret can lead to choice repetition as if seeking to make up for our mistakes and in so doing may lead to subsequent chasing behavior...
  22. pmc Amygdala involvement in self-blame regret
    Antoinette Nicolle
    University College London, London, UK
    Soc Neurosci 6:178-89. 2011
    ..The findings indicate that the way the brain processes regret-related outcomes depends on both objective and subjective aspects of responsibility, highlighting the critical importance of the amygdala...
  23. ncbi request reprint Differential patterns of multisensory interactions in core and belt areas of human auditory cortex
    Christoph Lehmann
    University Hospital of Clinical Psychiatry, University of Bern, 3000 Bern, Switzerland
    Neuroimage 31:294-300. 2006
    ..Our data suggest that crossmodal effects are differentially modulated according to the hierarchical core-belt organization of auditory cortex...
  24. doi request reprint Knowing how much you don't know: a neural organization of uncertainty estimates
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, UK
    Nat Rev Neurosci 13:572-86. 2012
    ..We conclude that the currently available evidence indicates that distinct neural encoding (including summary statistic-type representations) of uncertainty occurs in distinct neural systems...
  25. pmc Action dominates valence in anticipatory representations in the human striatum and dopaminergic midbrain
    Marc Guitart-Masip
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, W1CN 4AR, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 31:7867-75. 2011
    ..This dominant influence of action requires an enriched notion of opponency between reward and punishment...
  26. doi request reprint Human hippocampus arbitrates approach-avoidance conflict
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, 10099 Berlin, Germany Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich, 8032 Zurich, Switzerland Electronic address
    Curr Biol 24:541-7. 2014
    ....
  27. doi request reprint Model-based analysis of skin conductance responses: Towards causal models in psychophysiology
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, UK
    Psychophysiology 50:15-22. 2013
    ..This review concludes by considering the theoretical implications for the field of psychophysiology and benefits for practical data analysis...
  28. pmc Unimpaired discrimination of fearful prosody after amygdala lesion
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, UK Zurich University Hospital of Psychiatry, Switzerland Electronic address
    Neuropsychologia 51:2070-4. 2013
    ..Hence, we provide evidence that the amygdala is not required for recognition of fearful prosody. ..
  29. pmc An improved algorithm for model-based analysis of evoked skin conductance responses
    Dominik R Bach
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, United Kingdom Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany Zurich University Hospital for Psychiatry, Switzerland Electronic address
    Biol Psychol 94:490-7. 2013
    ....
  30. pmc How the opinion of others affects our valuation of objects
    Daniel K Campbell-Meiklejohn
    Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, London WC1N 3BG, UK
    Curr Biol 20:1165-70. 2010
    ..Influence at such a low level could contribute to rapid learning and the swift spread of values throughout a population...