Neil D Avent

Summary

Affiliation: University of Plymouth
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Cell-free fetal DNA in the maternal serum and plasma: current and evolving applications
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, University of West of England, Bristol, UK
    Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol 21:175-9. 2009
  2. doi request reprint Maternal plasma biomarkers for down syndrome: present and future
    N D Avent
    School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, Plymouth University Peninsula School of Medicine and Dentistry, UK
    Drugs Today (Barc) 49:145-52. 2013
  3. pmc 2D DIGE analysis of maternal plasma for potential biomarkers of Down Syndrome
    Wendy E Heywood
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY, UK
    Proteome Sci 9:56. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Transfusion medicine education session
    Neil D Avent
    School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake s Circus, Plymouth, UK
    Expert Rev Hematol 2:641-3. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Quantification of circulatory fetal DNA in the plasma of pregnant women
    Bernhard G Zimmermann
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Methods Mol Biol 444:219-29. 2008
  6. doi request reprint The SAFE project: towards non-invasive prenatal diagnosis
    Deborah G Maddocks
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Biochem Soc Trans 37:460-5. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Post-genomics studies and their application to non-invasive prenatal diagnosis
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY, UK
    Semin Fetal Neonatal Med 13:91-8. 2008
  8. doi request reprint Quantification of free fetal DNA in multiple pregnancies and relationship with chorionicity
    George Attilakos
    Fetal Medicine Unit, St Michael s Hospital, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK
    Prenat Diagn 31:967-72. 2011
  9. doi request reprint RHD genotyping from maternal plasma: guidelines and technical challenges
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Methods Mol Biol 444:185-201. 2008
  10. pmc 4.1R-deficient human red blood cells have altered phosphatidylserine exposure pathways and are deficient in CD44 and CD47 glycoproteins
    Kris P Jeremy
    University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Haematologica 94:1354-61. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. doi request reprint Cell-free fetal DNA in the maternal serum and plasma: current and evolving applications
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, University of West of England, Bristol, UK
    Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol 21:175-9. 2009
    ..However, for assessment of chromosome copy number, this is not so straightforward...
  2. doi request reprint Maternal plasma biomarkers for down syndrome: present and future
    N D Avent
    School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, Plymouth University Peninsula School of Medicine and Dentistry, UK
    Drugs Today (Barc) 49:145-52. 2013
    ....
  3. pmc 2D DIGE analysis of maternal plasma for potential biomarkers of Down Syndrome
    Wendy E Heywood
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY, UK
    Proteome Sci 9:56. 2011
    ..abstract:..
  4. doi request reprint Transfusion medicine education session
    Neil D Avent
    School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake s Circus, Plymouth, UK
    Expert Rev Hematol 2:641-3. 2009
    ..The session, therefore, included a significant discourse in clinical practice of transfusing the difficult to transfuse patient...
  5. doi request reprint Quantification of circulatory fetal DNA in the plasma of pregnant women
    Bernhard G Zimmermann
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Methods Mol Biol 444:219-29. 2008
    ..In this context, the quantification of fetal DNA is an important tool for the evaluation of protocols...
  6. doi request reprint The SAFE project: towards non-invasive prenatal diagnosis
    Deborah G Maddocks
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Biochem Soc Trans 37:460-5. 2009
    ..Owing to the high maternal DNA background, detection of ffDNA from maternal plasma is very difficult; consequently, research in this area is now more focused on ffRNA to produce new biomarkers...
  7. doi request reprint Post-genomics studies and their application to non-invasive prenatal diagnosis
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY, UK
    Semin Fetal Neonatal Med 13:91-8. 2008
    ..This review describes progress in these studies, particularly those funded by the Special Non-invasive Advances in Fetal and Neonatal Evaluation (SAFE) Network of Excellence...
  8. doi request reprint Quantification of free fetal DNA in multiple pregnancies and relationship with chorionicity
    George Attilakos
    Fetal Medicine Unit, St Michael s Hospital, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK
    Prenat Diagn 31:967-72. 2011
    ..Free fetal DNA (ffDNA) in the maternal plasma appears to originate mainly from the trophoblast. We tested the hypothesis that ffDNA concentration is increased in multiple pregnancies where trophoblastic mass has been shown to be increased...
  9. doi request reprint RHD genotyping from maternal plasma: guidelines and technical challenges
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Methods Mol Biol 444:185-201. 2008
    ..Furthermore, as yet undescribed viruses may be contaminants of blood products. Mass-scale RHD NIPD will shortly be implemented in several countries in the European Community as a consequence...
  10. pmc 4.1R-deficient human red blood cells have altered phosphatidylserine exposure pathways and are deficient in CD44 and CD47 glycoproteins
    Kris P Jeremy
    University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Haematologica 94:1354-61. 2009
    ..It imparts structural integrity and has transmembrane signaling roles by direct interactions with transmembrane proteins and other membrane skeletal components, notably p55 and calmodulin...
  11. ncbi request reprint Non-invasive diagnosis of fetal sex; utilisation of free fetal DNA in maternal plasma and ultrasound
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol
    Prenat Diagn 26:598-603. 2006
    ..This review touches briefly on the ultrasound diagnoses and then focuses on the application of free ffDNA for fetal sex determination, indicating the Y-chromosome targets exploited in this strategy and the merits of their utilisation...
  12. ncbi request reprint Molecular biology of Rh proteins and relevance to molecular medicine
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine and Genomics Research Institute, University of the West of England, Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay, Bristol, BS16 1QY, UK
    Expert Rev Mol Med 8:1-20. 2006
    ..This review summarises our current knowledge concerning the molecular biology of Rh proteins and their role in transfusion and pregnancy incompatibility...
  13. doi request reprint Large-scale blood group genotyping: clinical implications
    Neil D Avent
    Centre for Research in Biomedicine and UWE, Bristol Genomics Research Institute, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
    Br J Haematol 144:3-13. 2009
    ..This review overviews the current situation in this area and attempts to predict how blood group genotyping will evolve in the future...