D Attwell

Summary

Affiliation: University College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc The effect of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate on white matter oligodendrocytes
    Karolina Kolodziejczyk
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, UK
    Brain 132:1496-508. 2009
  2. pmc The role of pannexin hemichannels in the anoxic depolarization of hippocampal pyramidal cells
    Christian Madry
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Brain 133:3755-63. 2010
  3. pmc Charge compensation for NADPH oxidase activity in microglia in rat brain slices does not involve a proton current
    Anna De Simoni
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London, UK
    Eur J Neurosci 28:1146-56. 2008
  4. pmc The cortical energy needed for conscious perception
    Marieke L Schölvinck
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, England
    Neuroimage 40:1460-8. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Interaction of low frequency electric fields with the nervous system: the retina as a model system
    D Attwell
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Radiat Prot Dosimetry 106:341-8. 2003
  6. pmc Glial and neuronal control of brain blood flow
    David Attwell
    Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nature 468:232-43. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Neuroenergetics and the kinetic design of excitatory synapses
    David Attwell
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Rev Neurosci 6:841-9. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of functional brain imaging signals
    David Attwell
    Dept of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, UK
    Trends Neurosci 25:621-5. 2002
  9. pmc Modulation of extracellular glutamate concentration in rat brain slices by cystine-glutamate exchange
    O Warr
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 514:783-93. 1999
  10. pmc Multiple modes of GABAergic inhibition of rat cerebellar granule cells
    David J Rossi
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 548:97-110. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications51

  1. pmc The effect of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate on white matter oligodendrocytes
    Karolina Kolodziejczyk
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, UK
    Brain 132:1496-508. 2009
    ..We conclude that an action of NAAG on oligodendrocyte NMDA receptors is unlikely to be a major contributor to white matter damage in the leucodystrophies...
  2. pmc The role of pannexin hemichannels in the anoxic depolarization of hippocampal pyramidal cells
    Christian Madry
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Brain 133:3755-63. 2010
    ..Glutamate receptor channels remain the main candidate for generating the large inward current that produces the anoxic depolarization...
  3. pmc Charge compensation for NADPH oxidase activity in microglia in rat brain slices does not involve a proton current
    Anna De Simoni
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London, UK
    Eur J Neurosci 28:1146-56. 2008
    ..Instead, charge compensation may be mediated by a previously undescribed non-selective cation current...
  4. pmc The cortical energy needed for conscious perception
    Marieke L Schölvinck
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, England
    Neuroimage 40:1460-8. 2008
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Interaction of low frequency electric fields with the nervous system: the retina as a model system
    D Attwell
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Radiat Prot Dosimetry 106:341-8. 2003
    ....
  6. pmc Glial and neuronal control of brain blood flow
    David Attwell
    Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nature 468:232-43. 2010
    ..These conceptual shifts in our understanding of cerebral blood flow control have important implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches...
  7. ncbi request reprint Neuroenergetics and the kinetic design of excitatory synapses
    David Attwell
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Rev Neurosci 6:841-9. 2005
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of functional brain imaging signals
    David Attwell
    Dept of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, UK
    Trends Neurosci 25:621-5. 2002
    ..A firm understanding of the BOLD response will require investigation to be focussed on the neural signalling mechanisms controlling blood flow rather than on the locus of energy use...
  9. pmc Modulation of extracellular glutamate concentration in rat brain slices by cystine-glutamate exchange
    O Warr
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 514:783-93. 1999
    ..5. These data suggest that external cystine generates a current in slice Purkinje cells by activating cystine-glutamate exchange in cells of the slice, releasing glutamate which activates non-NMDA receptors in the Purkinje cell membrane...
  10. pmc Multiple modes of GABAergic inhibition of rat cerebellar granule cells
    David J Rossi
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 548:97-110. 2003
    ....
  11. pmc Electrogenic uptake of sulphur-containing analogues of glutamate and aspartate by Müller cells from the salamander retina
    M Bouvier
    Department of Physiology, University College London
    J Physiol 444:441-57. 1991
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Effect of acute exposure to ammonia on glutamate transport in glial cells isolated from the salamander retina
    D Mort
    Department of Physiology, University College London, United Kingdom
    J Neurophysiol 86:836-44. 2001
    ..These data suggest that ammonia speeds glutamate uptake both by increasing cytoplasmic pH and by a separate effect on the glutamate transporter. Approximately two-thirds of the speeding is due to the pH change...
  13. ncbi request reprint Neurotransmitter depletion by bafilomycin is promoted by vesicle turnover
    Pauline Cavelier
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neurosci Lett 412:95-100. 2007
    ..Simulations of vesicle energetics suggest either that bafilomycin and concanamycin act on the H(+)-ATPase from inside the vesicle, or that the vesicle membrane potential is maintained after the H(+)-ATPase is inhibited...
  14. ncbi request reprint Tonic and spillover inhibition of granule cells control information flow through cerebellar cortex
    Martine Hamann
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT, London, United Kingdom
    Neuron 33:625-33. 2002
    ..Tonic and spillover inhibition reduce the fraction of granule cells activated by mossy fiber input, generating an increase of coding sparseness, which is predicted to improve the information storage capacity of the cerebellum...
  15. pmc The role of glial glutamate transporters in maintaining the independent operation of juvenile mouse cerebellar parallel fibre synapses
    Paikan Marcaggi
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 552:89-107. 2003
    ..These results show that glial cell glutamate transporters allow neighbouring synapses to operate more independently, and control the postsynaptic response to high frequency bursts of action potentials...
  16. doi request reprint Glutamatergic signaling in the brain's white matter
    Y Bakiri
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neuroscience 158:266-74. 2009
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Retinal processing: visionary transgenics
    P Mobbs
    Department of Physiology, University College London, UK
    Curr Biol 7:R483-6. 1997
    ..Two recent reports in which transgene techniques were used to label specific cell classes in the mouse retina have opened the way to new methods of studying retinal signal processing...
  18. ncbi request reprint An energy budget for signaling in the grey matter of the brain
    D Attwell
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 21:1133-45. 2001
    ..Functional magnetic resonance imaging signals are likely to be dominated by changes in energy usage associated with synaptic currents and action potential propagation...
  19. ncbi request reprint Role of glial amino acid transporters in synaptic transmission and brain energetics
    Paikan Marcaggi
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    Glia 47:217-25. 2004
    ..Finally, we assess the role of glial amino acid transporters in transmitter recycling pathways...
  20. doi request reprint Do astrocytes really exocytose neurotransmitters?
    Nicola B Hamilton
    Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Rev Neurosci 11:227-38. 2010
    ..However, there is intense controversy about whether astrocytes can exocytose transmitters in vivo. Resolving this issue would considerably advance our understanding of brain function...
  21. pmc Assessing the physiological concentration and targets of nitric oxide in brain tissue
    Catherine N Hall
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 586:3597-615. 2008
    ..5 nm, producing a 1.5% inhibition of respiration. Thus, under physiological conditions, nitric oxide signals do not inhibit respiration but are well-tuned to the dynamic range of guanylyl cyclase activation...
  22. pmc Combining patch-clamping of cells in brain slices with immunocytochemical labeling to define cell type and developmental stage
    Ragnhildur Karadottir
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Protoc 1:1977-86. 2006
    ..With practice, approximately 80% of patch-clamped cells can be retrieved and have their proteins identified in this way. The entire protocol can be completed in 3-4 d...
  23. ncbi request reprint Knocking out the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1 reduces glutamate uptake but does not affect hippocampal glutamate dynamics in early simulated ischaemia
    Martine Hamann
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Eur J Neurosci 15:308-14. 2002
    ..These data are consistent with glutamate release being by reversal of neuronal transporters, and with uptake into glia being compromised by the ischaemia-evoked fall in the level of ATP needed to convert glutamate into glutamine...
  24. pmc Short- and long-term depression of rat cerebellar parallel fibre synaptic transmission mediated by synaptic crosstalk
    Paikan Marcaggi
    Department of Pharmacology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 578:545-50. 2007
    ..These results focus attention on the need to characterize the spatial pattern of parallel fibre activity evoked by physiological stimuli, in order to assess the conditions under which synaptic plasticity will occur in vivo...
  25. ncbi request reprint Active release of glycine or D-serine saturates the glycine site of NMDA receptors at the cerebellar mossy fibre to granule cell synapse
    Daniela Billups
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Eur J Neurosci 18:2975-80. 2003
    ..6 microM or 1.5 microM, respectively, requiring active release of glycine or d-serine...
  26. ncbi request reprint The electrical response of cerebellar Purkinje neurons to simulated ischaemia
    Martine Hamann
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London, UK
    Brain 128:2408-20. 2005
    ..The glutamate activating these receptors is released both by exocytosis (at early times) and by reversal of a glutamate transporter, apparently in neurons...
  27. pmc Endocannabinoid signaling depends on the spatial pattern of synapse activation
    Paikan Marcaggi
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Neurosci 8:776-81. 2005
    ..Endocannabinoid signaling initiated by type I metabotropic glutamate receptors is a homeostatic mechanism that detects synaptic crosstalk and downregulates glutamate release in order to promote synaptic independence...
  28. ncbi request reprint Tonic excitation and inhibition of neurons: ambient transmitter sources and computational consequences
    Pauline Cavelier
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Prog Biophys Mol Biol 87:3-16. 2005
    ..Here we assess the mechanisms which may determine the ambient levels of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, and consider their likely effect on information processing...
  29. pmc Modulation of ASIC channels in rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons by ischaemia-related signals
    Nicola J Allen
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 543:521-9. 2002
    ..These data reinforce suggestions of a mechanosensory aspect to ASIC channel function, and show that the activation of ASICs reflects the integration of multiple signals which are present during ischaemia...
  30. pmc Testing NMDA receptor block as a therapeutic strategy for reducing ischaemic damage to CNS white matter
    Yamina Bakiri
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London, England
    Glia 56:233-40. 2008
    ..Our results highlight the importance of developing new antagonists selective for oligodendrocyte NMDA receptors based on their difference in subunit structure from most neuronal NMDA receptors...
  31. pmc Miro1 is a calcium sensor for glutamate receptor-dependent localization of mitochondria at synapses
    Andrew F Macaskill
    Department of Neuroscience, Physiology, and Pharmacology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neuron 61:541-55. 2009
    ..Thus, Miro1 is a key determinant of how energy supply is matched to energy usage in neurons...
  32. pmc The ionic stoichiometry of the GLAST glutamate transporter in salamander retinal glia
    Simen Gylterud Owe
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 577:591-9. 2006
    ..A less powerful accumulation of glutamate by GLAST than by GLT-1 cannot be used to explain the high glutamate concentration measured by microdialysis...
  33. ncbi request reprint The amino terminus of the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1 interacts with the LIM protein Ajuba
    Helene Marie
    Department of Physiology, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    Mol Cell Neurosci 19:152-64. 2002
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Sequential release of GABA by exocytosis and reversed uptake leads to neuronal swelling in simulated ischemia of hippocampal slices
    Nicola J Allen
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 24:3837-49. 2004
    ..These data show that ischemia releases GABA initially by exocytosis and then by reversal of GAT-1 transporters and that the resulting Cl- influx through GABA(A) receptor channels causes potentially neurotoxic cell swelling...
  35. ncbi request reprint A preferential role for glycolysis in preventing the anoxic depolarization of rat hippocampal area CA1 pyramidal cells
    Nicola J Allen
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 25:848-59. 2005
    ..They also define a hierarchy of pool sizes for hippocampal energy stores and suggest that brain ATP production from glial lactate may not be significant in conditions of energy deprivation...
  36. pmc Neurotransmitter receptors in the life and death of oligodendrocytes
    R Karadottir
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neuroscience 145:1426-38. 2007
    ..Here we review the roles of neurotransmitter receptors in the normal function, and malfunction in pathological conditions, of oligodendrocytes...
  37. ncbi request reprint Transports of delight
    Clare Howarth
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, England
    Neuron 52:224-5. 2006
    ..A new study by Gurden et al. in this issue of Neuron reveals a surprising role of astrocyte glutamate transporters in generating these signals...
  38. pmc Spiking and nonspiking classes of oligodendrocyte precursor glia in CNS white matter
    Ragnhildur Karadottir
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nat Neurosci 11:450-6. 2008
    ..These data challenge the idea that only neurons generate action potentials in the CNS and imply that the development of therapies for demyelinating disorders will require defining which OPC type can carry out remyelination...
  39. ncbi request reprint Release of L-aspartate by reversal of glutamate transporters
    Paikan Marcaggi
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neuropharmacology 49:843-9. 2005
    ..Part of the activation of NMDA receptors which occurs in ischaemia is likely to reflect the release of aspartate by reversed uptake...
  40. ncbi request reprint GABAC receptor sensitivity is modulated by interaction with MAP1B
    D Billups
    Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, Department of Pharmacology, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 20:8643-50. 2000
    ..Thus, anchoring to the cytoskeleton lowers the sensitivity of GABA(C) receptors and provides a likely site for functional modulation of GABA(C) receptor-mediated inhibition...
  41. ncbi request reprint Reversal or reduction of glutamate and GABA transport in CNS pathology and therapy
    Nicola J Allen
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Pflugers Arch 449:132-42. 2004
    ..This review analyses the role of glutamate and GABA transporters in the pathogenesis and therapy of a number of acute and chronic neurological disorders...
  42. pmc The energy use associated with neural computation in the cerebellum
    Clare Howarth
    Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 30:403-14. 2010
    ..The blood vessel area supplying glucose and O(2) is spatially matched to energy consumption. The energy cost of storing motor information in the cerebellum was also estimated...
  43. pmc The effect of simulated ischaemia on spontaneous GABA release in area CA1 of the juvenile rat hippocampus
    Nicola J Allen
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 561:485-98. 2004
    ....
  44. pmc Control of intracellular chloride concentration and GABA response polarity in rat retinal ON bipolar cells
    Daniela Billups
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 545:183-98. 2002
    ..Time-dependent adaptation of [Cl(-)](i) to voltage changes in retinal bipolar cells may add a previously unsuspected layer of temporal processing to signals as they pass through the retina...
  45. pmc Bidirectional control of CNS capillary diameter by pericytes
    Claire M Peppiatt
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nature 443:700-4. 2006
    ..In simulated ischaemia, some pericytes constricted capillaries. Pericytes are probably modulators of blood flow in response to changes in neural activity, which may contribute to functional imaging signals and to CNS vascular disease...
  46. doi request reprint Electrical signalling properties of oligodendrocyte precursor cells
    Yamina Bakiri
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower St, London, WC1E 6BT, UK
    Neuron Glia Biol 5:3-11. 2009
    ....
  47. pmc Morphological and electrical properties of oligodendrocytes in the white matter of the corpus callosum and cerebellum
    Yamina Bakiri
    Department of Physiology, University College London, London, UK
    J Physiol 589:559-73. 2011
    ....
  48. pmc Tonic release of glutamate by a DIDS-sensitive mechanism in rat hippocampal slices
    Pauline Cavelier
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    J Physiol 564:397-410. 2005
    ..Theoretical calculations suggest that a significant fraction of tonic glutamate release in hippocampal slices could occur via diffusion of glutamate across lipid membranes...
  49. pmc NMDA receptors are expressed in oligodendrocytes and activated in ischaemia
    Ragnhildur Karadottir
    Department of Physiology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
    Nature 438:1162-6. 2005
    ..These results point to NMDA receptors of unusual subunit composition as a potential therapeutic target for preventing white matter damage in a variety of diseases...
  50. ncbi request reprint Neurobiology: feeding the brain
    Claire Peppiatt
    Nature 431:137-8. 2004