J Archer

Summary

Affiliation: University of Central Lancashire
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in social behavior. Are the social role and evolutionary explanations compatible?
    J Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, England
    Am Psychol 51:909-17. 1996
  2. ncbi request reprint Broad and narrow perspectives in grief theory: comment on Bonanno and Kaltman (1999)
    J Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE, Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Psychol Bull 127:554-60. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint Cross-cultural differences in physical aggression between partners: a social-role analysis
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Pers Soc Psychol Rev 10:133-53. 2006
  4. doi request reprint Can evolutionary principles explain patterns of family violence?
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Psychol Bull 139:403-40. 2013
  5. ncbi request reprint The importance of theory for evaluating evidence on sex differences
    John Archer
    University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Am Psychol 61:638-9; discussion 641-2. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Physical aggression as a function of perceived fighting ability and provocation: an experimental investigation
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
    Aggress Behav 34:9-24. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Differences between bullies and victims, and men and women, on aggression-related variables among prisoners
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE, Lancashire, UK
    Br J Soc Psychol 46:299-322. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Physical aggression as a function of perceived fighting ability among male and female prisoners
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
    Aggress Behav 33:563-73. 2007
  9. doi request reprint Does cost-benefit analysis or self-control predict involvement in bullying behavior by male prisoners?
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
    Aggress Behav 35:31-40. 2009
  10. doi request reprint The nature of human aggression
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 3TQ, UK
    Int J Law Psychiatry 32:202-8. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in social behavior. Are the social role and evolutionary explanations compatible?
    J Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, England
    Am Psychol 51:909-17. 1996
    ..It is concluded that evolutionary theory accounts much better for the overall pattern of sex differences and for their origins. A coevolutionary approach is proposed to explain cross-cultural consistency in socialization patterns...
  2. ncbi request reprint Broad and narrow perspectives in grief theory: comment on Bonanno and Kaltman (1999)
    J Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE, Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Psychol Bull 127:554-60. 2001
    ..M. S. Stroebe and H. A. W. Schut's (1994) dual process model, which involves cognitive restructuring and engaging in new activities, provides a broader alternative to grief work than that advocated by Bonanno and Kaltman...
  3. ncbi request reprint Cross-cultural differences in physical aggression between partners: a social-role analysis
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Pers Soc Psychol Rev 10:133-53. 2006
    ..The findings are discussed in terms of a social role approach to variations in sex differences between cultures...
  4. doi request reprint Can evolutionary principles explain patterns of family violence?
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Psychol Bull 139:403-40. 2013
    ..Recurrent problems in evaluating the evidence were to control for possible confounds and thus to distinguish evolutionary from alternative explanations. Suggestions are outlined to address this and other issues arising from the review...
  5. ncbi request reprint The importance of theory for evaluating evidence on sex differences
    John Archer
    University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Am Psychol 61:638-9; discussion 641-2. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Physical aggression as a function of perceived fighting ability and provocation: an experimental investigation
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
    Aggress Behav 34:9-24. 2008
    ..Delayed aggressive responses, including revenge fantasies, were highest in response to high provocation and high RHP. Findings are discussed in relation to theoretical models of aggressive motivation...
  7. ncbi request reprint Differences between bullies and victims, and men and women, on aggression-related variables among prisoners
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE, Lancashire, UK
    Br J Soc Psychol 46:299-322. 2007
    ..There were smaller differences in the male direction for revenge, indirect aggression and direct verbal aggression. These are discussed in relation to an evolutionary theory of sex differences in aggression...
  8. ncbi request reprint Physical aggression as a function of perceived fighting ability among male and female prisoners
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
    Aggress Behav 33:563-73. 2007
    ..Implications of the findings for motivational theories of aggression are discussed, and also the applicability to humans of concepts from game theory models of the evolution of fighting strategies...
  9. doi request reprint Does cost-benefit analysis or self-control predict involvement in bullying behavior by male prisoners?
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
    Aggress Behav 35:31-40. 2009
    ..The findings are discussed in relation to explanations of aggression based on impulse control or a cost-benefit analysis...
  10. doi request reprint The nature of human aggression
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 3TQ, UK
    Int J Law Psychiatry 32:202-8. 2009
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Does sexual selection explain human sex differences in aggression?
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
    Behav Brain Sci 32:249-66; discussion 266-311. 2009
    ..In this case, social roles are particularly important since they enable both the relatively equality in physical aggression between partners from Western nations, and the considerable cross-national variability, to be explained...
  12. doi request reprint Derivation and assessment of a hypermasculine values questionnaire
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
    Br J Soc Psychol 49:525-51. 2010
    ..Study 4 showed that the HVQ was associated with hostile but not benevolent sexism, and replicated its association with trait aggression...
  13. doi request reprint Does cost-benefit analysis or self-control predict involvement in two forms of aggression?
    John Archer
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
    Aggress Behav 36:292-304. 2010
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Testosterone and human aggression: an evaluation of the challenge hypothesis
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire PR12HE, UK
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev 30:319-45. 2006
    ..Most of these predictions were supported by the review of current research, although most studies were not designed to specifically test the challenge hypothesis...
  15. ncbi request reprint An integrated review of indirect, relational, and social aggression
    John Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Great Britain
    Pers Soc Psychol Rev 9:212-30. 2005
    ..We conclude that indirect, relational, and social aggression are much more similar than they are different, and we suggest ways in which future research can be facilitated by integrating the three areas under an adaptive framework...
  16. ncbi request reprint The influence of victim gender and sexual orientation on judgments of the victim in a depicted stranger rape
    M Davies
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
    Violence Vict 16:607-19. 2001
    ..Results are discussed in relation to the feminist analysis of victim blame, and blame toward male rape victims. Implications for support services, particularly of male victims, are also considered...
  17. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in aggression between heterosexual partners: a meta-analytic review
    J Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Psychol Bull 126:651-80. 2000
    ..Wider variations are discussed in terms of two conflicting norms about physical aggression to partners that operate to different degrees in different cultures...
  18. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in physical aggression to partners: a reply to Frieze (2000), O'Leary (2000), and White, Smith, Koss, and Figueredo (2000)
    J Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
    Psychol Bull 126:697-702. 2000
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Intimate terrorism and common couple violence. A test of Johnson's predictions in four British samples
    Nicola Graham-Kevan
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, UK
    J Interpers Violence 18:1247-70. 2003
    ..Cluster analysis was employed to categorize relationships as either intimate terrorism or common couple violence. Frequency analysis showed broad support for Johnson's findings...
  20. ncbi request reprint Physical aggression and control in heterosexual relationships: the effect of sampling
    Nicola Graham-Kevan
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preshon Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Violence Vict 18:181-96. 2003
    ..The DFA produced two significant functions which together correctly classified 75% of cases. These results support the view that there are distinct patterns of aggressive relationships corresponding to those identified by Johnson (1995)...
  21. doi request reprint Adaptive and maladaptive personality traits as predictors of violent and nonviolent offending behavior in men and women
    Abigail J Varley Thornton
    School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Aggress Behav 36:177-86. 2010
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Characteristics of male and female prisoners involved in bullying behavior
    Jane L Ireland
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, UK
    Aggress Behav 33:220-9. 2007
    ..Directions for future research are suggested...
  23. ncbi request reprint Effects of perpetrator gender and victim sexuality on blame toward male victims of sexual assault
    Michelle Davies
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom
    J Soc Psychol 146:275-91. 2006
    ..The authors discussed the present results in relation to gender role stereotypes...
  24. ncbi request reprint Cruel intentions on television and in real life: can viewing indirect aggression increase viewers' subsequent indirect aggression?
    Sarah M Coyne
    University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
    J Exp Child Psychol 88:234-53. 2004
    ..This study provides the first evidence that viewing indirect aggression in the media can have an immediate impact on subsequent aggression...
  25. ncbi request reprint Effects of rape on men: a descriptive analysis
    Jayne Walker
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, England
    Arch Sex Behav 34:69-80. 2005
    ..Findings are discussed in relation to previous research in the area and perceptions of rape...
  26. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in beliefs about aggression: opponent's sex and the form of aggression
    J Archer
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, UK
    Br J Soc Psychol 38:71-84. 1999
    ..As in previous studies, instrumental and expressive beliefs were relatively independent of one another. The position that the beliefs represent rhetorical devices is assessed in the light of these findings...
  27. ncbi request reprint Effects of male rape on psychological functioning
    Jayne Walker
    Department of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, UK
    Br J Clin Psychol 44:445-51. 2005
    ..The aim of this study was investigate the psychological functioning of 40 British male rape survivors, and compare their level of functioning with that of a matched control group...
  28. ncbi request reprint Effects of testosterone on mood, aggression, and sexual behavior in young men: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study
    Daryl B O'Connor
    Department of Endocrinology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, United Kingdom
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab 89:2837-45. 2004
    ..Future research should investigate the implications of these minor mood changes...
  29. ncbi request reprint Sex differences in childhood anger and aggression
    Michael Potegal
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, 777 Mayo, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am 13:513-28, vi-vii. 2004
    ..By this age, girls tend to suppress the expression of anger consciously. By about 7 to 8 years of age, adult like differences become more consistent, with boys expressing more anger...
  30. ncbi request reprint Exogenous testosterone, aggression, and mood in eugonadal and hypogonadal men
    Daryl B O'Connor
    Department of Endocrinology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester M13 9WL, UK
    Physiol Behav 75:557-66. 2002
    ..Instead, for the first time, this study has identified the high level of negative affect experienced by hypogonadal patients. These findings have implications for T replacement therapy and male contraception...