James R Anderson

Summary

Affiliation: University of Stirling
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Gone fishing: tool use in animals
    James R Anderson
    University of Stirling, Scotland
    Biologist (London) 49:15-8. 2002
  2. doi request reprint Third-party social evaluation of humans by monkeys
    James R Anderson
    Division of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Nat Commun 4:1561. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Capuchin monkeys judge third-party reciprocity
    James R Anderson
    Division of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK
    Cognition 127:140-6. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Quality before quantity: rapid learning of reverse-reward contingency by capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella)
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    J Comp Psychol 122:445-8. 2008
  5. doi request reprint A primatological perspective on death
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Scotland
    Am J Primatol 73:410-4. 2011
  6. doi request reprint Flexibility in the use of requesting gestures in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Scotland
    Am J Primatol 72:707-14. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Gaze alternation during "pointing" by squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)?
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 10:267-71. 2007
  8. doi request reprint Delay of gratification in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    J Comp Psychol 124:205-10. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Non-human primates: a comparative developmental perspective on yawning
    James R Anderson
    University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    Front Neurol Neurosci 28:63-76. 2010
  10. pmc Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) respond to video images of themselves
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 12:55-62. 2009

Detail Information

Publications40

  1. ncbi request reprint Gone fishing: tool use in animals
    James R Anderson
    University of Stirling, Scotland
    Biologist (London) 49:15-8. 2002
    ..But there are many intriguing examples of tool use described across the animal kingdom. Ants use grain to carry honey, and elephants can grip fly switches in their prehensile trunks. Even animals without limbs may use tools...
  2. doi request reprint Third-party social evaluation of humans by monkeys
    James R Anderson
    Division of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Nat Commun 4:1561. 2013
    ..This negative social evaluation effect is robust across conditions, and tightly linked to explicit refusal to help. Evaluation of potential helpfulness based on third-party interactions may thus not be unique to humans...
  3. doi request reprint Capuchin monkeys judge third-party reciprocity
    James R Anderson
    Division of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK
    Cognition 127:140-6. 2013
    ..These results indicate that the cognitive or emotional prerequisites for judging reciprocity in third-party social exchanges exist in at least one other primate species...
  4. doi request reprint Quality before quantity: rapid learning of reverse-reward contingency by capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella)
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    J Comp Psychol 122:445-8. 2008
    ....
  5. doi request reprint A primatological perspective on death
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Scotland
    Am J Primatol 73:410-4. 2011
    ..Some aspects of death awareness recognized by developmental psychologists might help guide research efforts in this area...
  6. doi request reprint Flexibility in the use of requesting gestures in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Scotland
    Am J Primatol 72:707-14. 2010
    ..This is the first demonstration of such flexible use of an intentionally communicative requesting gesture in New World monkeys...
  7. ncbi request reprint Gaze alternation during "pointing" by squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)?
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 10:267-71. 2007
    ..This type of GA suggests that the monkeys were communicating with the partner. However, the monkeys' behavior was not influenced by changes in the partner's focus of attention...
  8. doi request reprint Delay of gratification in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    J Comp Psychol 124:205-10. 2010
    ..Short (1 s) interitem delays were generally easier to maintain than longer delays (3 or 5 s). In both species the delaying individuals bridged the delays idiosyncratically...
  9. doi request reprint Non-human primates: a comparative developmental perspective on yawning
    James R Anderson
    University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    Front Neurol Neurosci 28:63-76. 2010
    ..This would explain the lack of contagious yawning reported in young children and chimpanzees in natural surroundings, as these populations do not have the same social constraints on yawning...
  10. pmc Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) respond to video images of themselves
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 12:55-62. 2009
    ..In species such as humans and great apes, this type of self-awareness feeds into a system that gives rise to explicit self-recognition...
  11. doi request reprint Colour versus quantity as cues in reverse-reward-competent squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 62:673-80. 2009
    ..Individual differences and the possible roles of overshadowing and blocking are discussed...
  12. ncbi request reprint Attention to combined attention in new world monkeys (Cebus apella, Saimiri sciureus)
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    J Comp Psychol 119:461-4. 2005
    ..These results suggest variable attention-processing abilities in New World monkeys, including differences in summation of attention by others...
  13. doi request reprint Do rhesus monkeys recognize themselves in mirrors?
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    Am J Primatol 73:603-6. 2011
    ..We critically examine this claim, and conclude that the article fails to provide acceptable evidence for self-recognition in rhesus monkeys...
  14. pmc Contagious yawning in chimpanzees
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S468-70. 2004
    ..Contagious yawning is thought to be based on the capacity for empathy. Contagious yawning in chimpanzees provides further evidence that these apes may possess advanced self-awareness and empathic abilities...
  15. ncbi request reprint Training squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) to deceive: acquisition and analysis of behavior toward cooperative and competitive trainers
    J R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Scotland
    J Comp Psychol 115:282-93. 2001
    ..Although not indicative of mental attribution, the monkeys' behavior suggests awareness of the acquired communicative function of the reaching response...
  16. ncbi request reprint Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) choose smaller food arrays: long-term retention, choice with nonpreferred food, and transposition
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    J Comp Psychol 118:58-64. 2004
    ..Individual differences in mastering the original task more than 8 months previously were quite stable, suggesting robustness in the operations required for this form of self-control...
  17. ncbi request reprint Are monkeys aesthetists? Rensch (1957) revisited
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 31:71-8. 2005
    ..Squirrel monkeys responded less discriminatingly to the touch screen stimuli. The findings provide support for B. Rensch's (1957) claim that monkeys prefer visual stimuli that humans find aesthetically pleasing...
  18. ncbi request reprint Do squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) predict that looking leads to touching?
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, FK9 4LA, Stirling, Scotland
    Anim Cogn 7:185-92. 2004
    ..Additional evidence is required before concluding that behavior prediction based on gaze cues typifies primates; other approaches for studying how they process attention cues are indicated...
  19. ncbi request reprint Can squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) learn self-control? A study using food array selection tests and reverse-reward contingency
    J R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Scotland
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 26:87-97. 2000
    ....
  20. doi request reprint The rapid development of explicit gaze judgment ability at 3 years
    Martin J Doherty
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    J Exp Child Psychol 104:296-312. 2009
    ..Therefore, the ability does not develop out of earlier gaze following. General implications for the evolution and development of gaze processing are discussed...
  21. ncbi request reprint Redundant food searches by capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella): a failure of metacognition?
    Annika Paukner
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
    Anim Cogn 9:110-7. 2006
    ..This difference is consistent with species-related variations in metacognitive abilities, although other explanations are also possible...
  22. doi request reprint Brown (Eulemur fulvus) and ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) use human head orientation as a cue to gaze direction in a food choice task
    Jennifer L Botting
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 82:165-76. 2011
    ..This study provides the first tentative evidence that lemurs are capable of discriminating human gaze direction and can use both body and head direction to do so...
  23. ncbi request reprint Do facial gestures, visibility or speed of movement influence gaze following responses in pigtail macaques?
    Annika Paukner
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
    Primates 48:241-4. 2007
    ..All monkeys reliably followed the gaze in all conditions with no differences between conditions. A greater frequency of GFR was found in females compared to males, and two hypotheses for this finding are discussed...
  24. ncbi request reprint Pictorial gaze cues do not enhance long-tailed macaques' performance on a computerised object-location task
    Sarah Jane Vick
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA Scotland, United Kingdom
    Behav Processes 73:308-14. 2006
    ....
  25. doi request reprint How do African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) perform on a delay of gratification task?
    Sarah Jane Vick
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland, UK
    Anim Cogn 13:351-8. 2010
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint Reactions of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) to multiple mirrors
    Annika Paukner
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Behav Processes 66:1-6. 2004
    ..The results confirm and expand on previous reports of failure to find evidence of mirror self-recognition in monkeys...
  27. ncbi request reprint Animal behavior: tolerant primates cooperate best
    James R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    Curr Biol 17:R242-4. 2007
    ..Chimpanzees and bonobos show different cooperative tendencies when the prize is easily monopolizable food: bonobos cooperate more than their less socially tolerant relatives...
  28. doi request reprint Kin, daytime associations, or preferred sleeping sites? Factors influencing sleep site selection in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)
    Louise C Lock
    Division of Psychology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 84:158-69. 2013
    ..In the interests of captive ape welfare, we conclude that exhibits should incorporate multilevel nesting areas and a choice of several potential sleeping sites. ..
  29. pmc Chimpanzees share forbidden fruit
    Kimberley J Hockings
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland
    PLoS ONE 2:e886. 2007
    ....
  30. pmc Macaques (Macaca nemestrina) recognize when they are being imitated
    Annika Paukner
    Psychology Department, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK
    Biol Lett 1:219-22. 2005
    ..The monkeys might implicitly recognize when they are being imitated without deeper insight into the mental processes of others...
  31. pmc Video-induced yawning in stumptail macaques (Macaca arctoides)
    Annika Paukner
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK
    Biol Lett 2:36-8. 2006
    ..Understanding to what extent the observed effect resembles contagious yawning as found in humans and chimpanzees requires more detailed experimentation...
  32. pmc Neither infants nor toddlers catch yawns from their mothers
    Ailsa Millen
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK
    Biol Lett 7:440-2. 2011
    ..The results suggest that, even when witnessing yawns by someone with whom they have a strong and positive emotional relationship, very young children do not show contagious yawning...
  33. ncbi request reprint Animal behaviour: pigtailed police
    James R Anderson
    Department of Pyschology, University of Stirling, UK
    Curr Biol 15:R427-9. 2005
    ..Questions arise about the ontogenetic and phylogenetic emergence of policing individuals...
  34. ncbi request reprint Discrimination learning and multiple reversals in young adult and older monkeys (Macaca arctoides)
    J R Anderson
    Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Scotland
    Q J Exp Psychol B 49:193-200. 1996
    ....
  35. ncbi request reprint Use of human visual attention cues by olive baboons (Papio anubis) in a competitive task
    Sarah Jane Vick
    Centre Nacional de la Recherche Scientifique Station de Primatologie, Rousset sur Arc, France
    J Comp Psychol 117:209-16. 2003
    ..Performance was disrupted by the introduction of a screen and objects to conceal food items and by the absence of movement in cues presented...
  36. ncbi request reprint Cued repetition of self-directed behaviors in macaques (Macaca nemestrina)
    Annika Paukner
    Psychology DepartmentUniversity of Stirling, Stirling, United Kingdom
    J Exp Psychol Anim Behav Process 33:139-47. 2007
    ..Implications for episodic memory abilities are discussed...
  37. ncbi request reprint Road crossing in chimpanzees: a risky business
    Kimberley J Hockings
    Curr Biol 16:R668-70. 2006
  38. ncbi request reprint On self-scratching in captive mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)
    Patricia Peignot
    Centre International de Recherches Medicales de Franceville, Franceville, Gabon
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 75:160-4. 2004
  39. ncbi request reprint Influence of social and environmental factors on nesting behaviour in captive gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla)
    Iris Weiche
    Animal Physiological Ecology, University of Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany
    Folia Primatol (Basel) 78:154-65. 2007
    ..5-3 m was typical. Group dynamics were reflected in nesting arrangements. We suggest that possibilities for co-nesting and choice of sleeping sites should be provided to improve the welfare of captive gorillas and other great apes...