Chris Stringer

Summary

Affiliation: The Natural History Museum
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint On the reliability of recent tests of the Out of Africa hypothesis for modern human origins
    Gunter Brauer
    Institute of Human Biology, University of Hamburg, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 279:701-7. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Why we are not all multiregionalists now
    Chris Stringer
    Department of Earth Sciences, The Natural History Museum, London, SW7 5BD, UK Electronic address
    Trends Ecol Evol 29:248-51. 2014
  3. doi request reprint The status of Homo heidelbergensis (Schoetensack 1908)
    Chris Stringer
    Evol Anthropol 21:101-7. 2012
  4. pmc Modern human origins: progress and prospects
    Chris Stringer
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:563-79. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Electronic removal of encrustations inside the Steinheim cranium reveals paranasal sinus features and deformations, and provides a revised endocranial volume estimate
    Hermann Prossinger
    Institute of Anthroplogy, University of Vienna, Austria
    Anat Rec B New Anat 273:132-42. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint The thermal history of human fossils and the likelihood of successful DNA amplification
    Colin I Smith
    Fossil Fuels and Environmental Geochemistry, NRG, Drummond Building, University of Newcastle, NE1 7RU Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
    J Hum Evol 45:203-17. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Human evolution: Out of Ethiopia
    Chris Stringer
    Nature 423:692-3, 695. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint The 'human revolution' in lowland tropical Southeast Asia: the antiquity and behavior of anatomically modern humans at Niah Cave (Sarawak, Borneo)
    Graeme Barker
    McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3ER, UK
    J Hum Evol 52:243-61. 2007
  9. pmc The genetic origins of the Andaman Islanders
    Phillip Endicott
    Henry Wellcome Ancient Biomolecules Centre, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PS England
    Am J Hum Genet 72:178-84. 2003
  10. pmc 82,000-year-old shell beads from North Africa and implications for the origins of modern human behavior
    Abdeljalil Bouzouggar
    Institut National des Sciences de l Archéologie et du Patrimoine, 10001 Rabat, Morocco
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:9964-9. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. ncbi request reprint On the reliability of recent tests of the Out of Africa hypothesis for modern human origins
    Gunter Brauer
    Institute of Human Biology, University of Hamburg, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 279:701-7. 2004
    ..2000) and Wolpoff et al. (2001). In view of the foregoing, we contend that Hawks et al.'s (2000) and Wolpoff et al.'s (2001) claim to have disproved the Out of Africa hypothesis cannot be sustained...
  2. ncbi request reprint Why we are not all multiregionalists now
    Chris Stringer
    Department of Earth Sciences, The Natural History Museum, London, SW7 5BD, UK Electronic address
    Trends Ecol Evol 29:248-51. 2014
    ..Thus, rather than multiregionalism, a recent African origin (RAO) model for modern humans is still supported by the data. ..
  3. doi request reprint The status of Homo heidelbergensis (Schoetensack 1908)
    Chris Stringer
    Evol Anthropol 21:101-7. 2012
    ..Accordingly, clarifying the status of Homo heidelbergensis is fundamental to the debate about modern human origins...
  4. pmc Modern human origins: progress and prospects
    Chris Stringer
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:563-79. 2002
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Electronic removal of encrustations inside the Steinheim cranium reveals paranasal sinus features and deformations, and provides a revised endocranial volume estimate
    Hermann Prossinger
    Institute of Anthroplogy, University of Vienna, Austria
    Anat Rec B New Anat 273:132-42. 2003
    ..Third, we assess the extent of the endocranial deformations and, fourth, their implications for our estimation of the braincase volume...
  6. ncbi request reprint The thermal history of human fossils and the likelihood of successful DNA amplification
    Colin I Smith
    Fossil Fuels and Environmental Geochemistry, NRG, Drummond Building, University of Newcastle, NE1 7RU Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
    J Hum Evol 45:203-17. 2003
    ..The claims of aDNA amplification from material found at Lake Mungo, Australia, are also considered in the light of the thermal history of this site...
  7. ncbi request reprint Human evolution: Out of Ethiopia
    Chris Stringer
    Nature 423:692-3, 695. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint The 'human revolution' in lowland tropical Southeast Asia: the antiquity and behavior of anatomically modern humans at Niah Cave (Sarawak, Borneo)
    Graeme Barker
    McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3ER, UK
    J Hum Evol 52:243-61. 2007
    ..The Niah evidence demonstrates the sophisticated nature of the subsistence behavior developed by modern humans to exploit the tropical environments that they encountered in Southeast Asia, including rainforest...
  9. pmc The genetic origins of the Andaman Islanders
    Phillip Endicott
    Henry Wellcome Ancient Biomolecules Centre, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PS England
    Am J Hum Genet 72:178-84. 2003
    ..The results demonstrate that Victorian anthropological collections can be used to study extinct, or seriously admixed populations, to provide new data about early human origins...
  10. pmc 82,000-year-old shell beads from North Africa and implications for the origins of modern human behavior
    Abdeljalil Bouzouggar
    Institut National des Sciences de l Archéologie et du Patrimoine, 10001 Rabat, Morocco
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:9964-9. 2007
    ..These findings imply an early distribution of bead-making in Africa and southwest Asia at least 40 millennia before the appearance of similar cultural manifestations in Europe...
  11. ncbi request reprint Evidence for new Neanderthal teeth in Tabun Cave (Israel) by the application of self-organizing maps (SOMs)
    Alfredo Coppa
    Department of Animal and Human Biology, Section of Anthropology, University of Rome La Sapienza, 5 Piazzale Aldo Moro, Rome 00185, Italy
    J Hum Evol 52:601-13. 2007
    ..Both identify Tabun BC7 as a Neanderthal. Neural networks are a promising tool for paleoanthropological studies as they can provide reliable classifications even with incomplete data...
  12. ncbi request reprint Middle Paleolithic shell beads in Israel and Algeria
    Marian Vanhaereny
    Centre for the Evolution of Cultural Diversity, University College London, 31 34 Gordon Square, London WC1H OPY, UK Ethnologie Préhistorique, CNRS UMR 7041, 21 Allée de l Université, F 92023 Nanterre, France
    Science 312:1785-8. 2006
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint ESR and U-series analyses of enamel and dentine fragments of the Banyoles mandible
    Rainer Grün
    Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
    J Hum Evol 50:347-58. 2006
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Newly recognized Pleistocene human teeth from Tabun Cave, Israel
    Alfredo Coppa
    Department of Animal and Human Biology, Section of Anthropology, University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
    J Hum Evol 49:301-15. 2005
    ..On the basis of chronology, dental morphology and metrics, the specimen named Tabun BC7 was identified as a probable Neanderthal...
  15. ncbi request reprint U-series and ESR analyses of bones and teeth relating to the human burials from Skhul
    Rainer Grün
    Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia Research Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    J Hum Evol 49:316-34. 2005
    ..This supports the view that, despite the associated Middle Palaeolithic technology, elements of modern human behaviour were represented at Skhul and Qafzeh prior to 100 ka...