P S Rainbow

Summary

Affiliation: The Natural History Museum
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Caddisflies as biomonitors identifying thresholds of toxic metal bioavailability that affect the stream benthos
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Environ Pollut 166:196-207. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Barnacles as biomonitors of trace metal availabilities in Hong Kong coastal waters: changes in space and time
    P S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Mar Environ Res 51:441-63. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint Trace metal bioaccumulation: models, metabolic availability and toxicity
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Environ Int 33:576-82. 2007
  4. doi request reprint Have the bioavailabilities of trace metals to a suite of biomonitors changed over three decades in SW England estuaries historically affected by mining?
    P S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Sci Total Environ 409:1589-602. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Trophically available metal--a variable feast
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Environ Pollut 159:2347-9. 2011
  6. doi request reprint Metal toxicity, uptake and bioaccumulation in aquatic invertebrates--modelling zinc in crustaceans
    P S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Aquat Toxicol 105:455-65. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Kenneth Mellanby Review Award. Trace metal concentrations in aquatic invertebrates: why and so what?
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Environ Pollut 120:497-507. 2002
  8. doi request reprint Bioaccumulation of arsenic from water and sediment by a deposit-feeding polychaete (Arenicola marina): a biodynamic modelling approach
    M C Casado-Martinez
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Aquat Toxicol 98:34-43. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Biodynamic modelling of the accumulation of Ag, Cd and Zn by the deposit-feeding polychaete Nereis diversicolor: inter-population variability and a generalised predictive model
    J Kalman
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London, United Kingdom
    Mar Environ Res 69:363-73. 2010
  10. doi request reprint Arsenic toxicity in a sediment-dwelling polychaete: detoxification and arsenic metabolism
    M C Casado-Martinez
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Ecotoxicology 21:576-90. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications25

  1. doi request reprint Caddisflies as biomonitors identifying thresholds of toxic metal bioavailability that affect the stream benthos
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Environ Pollut 166:196-207. 2012
    ..The results offer promise that bioaccumulated concentrations of metals in tolerant biomonitors can be used to diagnose ecological impacts on stream benthos from metal stressors...
  2. ncbi request reprint Barnacles as biomonitors of trace metal availabilities in Hong Kong coastal waters: changes in space and time
    P S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Mar Environ Res 51:441-63. 2001
    ..The two barnacle species are widespread and the extensive data set presented is a benchmark which can be compared to the results of similar biomonitoring programmes elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific and beyond...
  3. ncbi request reprint Trace metal bioaccumulation: models, metabolic availability and toxicity
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Environ Int 33:576-82. 2007
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Have the bioavailabilities of trace metals to a suite of biomonitors changed over three decades in SW England estuaries historically affected by mining?
    P S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Sci Total Environ 409:1589-602. 2011
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Trophically available metal--a variable feast
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Environ Pollut 159:2347-9. 2011
    ..It is now clear that what is trophically available varies between food items, consumers and metals. TAM as originally defined should be seen as a useful starting hypothesis, not as a statement of fact...
  6. doi request reprint Metal toxicity, uptake and bioaccumulation in aquatic invertebrates--modelling zinc in crustaceans
    P S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Aquat Toxicol 105:455-65. 2011
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Kenneth Mellanby Review Award. Trace metal concentrations in aquatic invertebrates: why and so what?
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Environ Pollut 120:497-507. 2002
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Bioaccumulation of arsenic from water and sediment by a deposit-feeding polychaete (Arenicola marina): a biodynamic modelling approach
    M C Casado-Martinez
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Aquat Toxicol 98:34-43. 2010
    ..This study showed that it is difficult to predict accurately As bioaccumulation at sites with different chemistries, unless that chemistry is taken into account...
  9. doi request reprint Biodynamic modelling of the accumulation of Ag, Cd and Zn by the deposit-feeding polychaete Nereis diversicolor: inter-population variability and a generalised predictive model
    J Kalman
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London, United Kingdom
    Mar Environ Res 69:363-73. 2010
    ....
  10. doi request reprint Arsenic toxicity in a sediment-dwelling polychaete: detoxification and arsenic metabolism
    M C Casado-Martinez
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Ecotoxicology 21:576-90. 2012
    ..Our results suggest that a metal sensitive compartment comprising the cellular debris, enzymes and organelles fractions may be more representative of the toxic effects observed...
  11. ncbi request reprint Pathways of trace metal uptake in the lugworm Arenicola marina
    M C Casado-Martinez
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW75BD, United Kingdom
    Aquat Toxicol 92:9-17. 2009
    ..The model also shows that metal accumulation is highly dependent on the ingestion rate and assimilation efficiency...
  12. doi request reprint Metal toxicity in a sediment-dwelling polychaete: threshold body concentrations or overwhelming accumulation rates?
    M Carmen Casado-Martinez
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Environ Pollut 158:3071-6. 2010
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Biodynamic modelling and the prediction of accumulated trace metal concentrations in the polychaete Arenicola marina
    M Carmen Casado-Martinez
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Environ Pollut 157:2743-50. 2009
    ..Therefore, it appears that the physiological parameters experimentally derived for A. marina are applicable to the conditions encountered in these environments and that the assumptions made in the model are plausible...
  14. ncbi request reprint Biodynamic modelling of the bioaccumulation of trace metals (Ag, As and Zn) by an infaunal estuarine invertebrate, the clam Scrobicularia plana
    J Kalman
    Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom Electronic address
    Aquat Toxicol 154:121-30. 2014
    ..plana, taking into account specific dissolved and sediment concentrations of the metals at a particular field site, together with local water and sediment geochemistries. ..
  15. ncbi request reprint Cadmium, zinc and the uptake of calcium by two crabs, Carcinus maenas and Eriocheir sinensis
    P S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Aquat Toxicol 72:45-65. 2005
    ..sinensis only) when Ca may be taken up into gill ionocytes by another (active?) physiological process...
  16. ncbi request reprint Trace metals in barnacles: the significance of trophic transfer
    Philip S Rainbow
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, London, UK
    Sci China C Life Sci 48:110-7. 2005
    ..Kinetic modelling has shown that low efflux rate constants and high uptake rates from the diet combine to bring about accumulated trace metal concentrations in barnacles that are amongst the highest known in marine invertebrates...
  17. ncbi request reprint Dioxin and PCB contamination in Chinese mitten crabs: human consumption as a control mechanism for an invasive species
    Paul F Clark
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Environ Sci Technol 43:1624-9. 2009
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Mayfly larvae (Baetis rhodani and B. vernus) as biomonitors of trace metal pollution in streams of a catchment draining a zinc and lead mining area of Upper Silesia, Poland
    Wojciech Fialkowski
    Department of Hydrobiology, Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 3, 30 387 Krakow, Poland
    Environ Pollut 121:253-67. 2003
    ..Mayfly larvae are members of a suite of potential stream biomonitors in Central Europe, which together can provide information on the different sources of bioavailable trace metals present in aquatic ecosystems...
  19. ncbi request reprint Why is metal bioaccumulation so variable? Biodynamics as a unifying concept
    Samuel N Luoma
    US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 39:1921-31. 2005
    ..The agreement suggests that the basic assumptions of the biodynamic model are tenable. A unified explanation of metal bioaccumulation sets the stage for a realistic understanding of toxicity and ecological effects of metals in nature...
  20. ncbi request reprint Analysis of metal-containing granules in the barnacle Tetraclita squamosa
    Ombretta Masala
    Manchester Materials Science Centre and Department of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
    J Inorg Biochem 98:1095-102. 2004
    ..Oxalates, carbonates and sulfur derivates were also found in small amounts. The deposits were amorphous to X-ray and electron diffraction and were approximately spherical in shape with diameters between 100 and 500 nm...
  21. ncbi request reprint Influence of metal exposure history on trace metal uptake and accumulation by marine invertebrates
    Wen Xiong Wang
    Department of Biology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology HKUST, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
    Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 61:145-59. 2005
    ..Trace metal accumulation may also be variable in different natural populations of bivalves as a result of different physicochemical environments and histories of exposure. We finally suggest a few areas for future research in this field...
  22. ncbi request reprint Comparative biomonitors of coastal trace metal contamination in tropical South America (N. Brazil)
    Carlos Augusto R e Silva
    Departamento de Oceanografia e Limnologia Laboratório de Biogeoquímica Ambiental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal RN, CEP 59075 970, Brazil
    Mar Environ Res 61:439-55. 2006
    ..Barnacles (F. citerosum) showed the best discrimination, but oysters (C. rhizophorae) are particularly recommended as biomonitors given their strong accumulation patterns for many trace metals, their large size and their local abundance...
  23. ncbi request reprint The discriminatory power of two biomonitors of trace metal bioavailabilities in freshwater streams
    Wojciech Fialkowski
    Department of Hydrobiology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30 387 Krakow, Poland
    Water Res 40:1805-10. 2006
    ..The bioavailabilities of the two metals lead and cadmium were the major local contributing factors to the stronger discrimination shown by the Baetis larvae...
  24. ncbi request reprint From biomarkers to population responses in Nereis diversicolor: assessment of stress in estuarine ecosystems
    Cyril Durou
    Institut de Biologie et d Ecologie Appliquée CEREA, Université Catholique de l Ouest, 44, rue Rabelais, 49008 Angers Cedex 01, France
    Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 66:402-11. 2007
    ..The concomitant changes in energy reserves, egg production, and population structure and density suggest that the effects on biomarkers and at the population level are related...
  25. doi request reprint Bioaccessibility of essential and non-essential metals in commercial shellfish from Western Europe and Asia
    Jean Claude Amiard
    Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, MMS, EA2160, Faculte de Pharmacie, 1 rue G Veil BP 53508, Nantes F 44000, France
    Food Chem Toxicol 46:2010-22. 2008
    ..The influence of feeding habit (masticated or swallowed, addition of vinegar or lemon) on metal bioaccessibility in oysters is limited. On the contrary, cooking the gastropods decreased the bioaccessibility of metals, except silver...