Davide Pisani

Summary

Affiliation: The Natural History Museum
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc The colonization of land by animals: molecular phylogeny and divergence times among arthropods
    Davide Pisani
    NASA Astrobiology Institute and Department of Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    BMC Biol 2:1. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Identifying and removing fast-evolving sites using compatibility analysis: an example from the Arthropoda
    Davide Pisani
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, United Kingdom
    Syst Biol 53:978-89. 2004
  3. pmc Relative time scales reveal multiple origins of parallel disjunct distributions of African caecilian amphibians
    Simon P Loader
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Biol Lett 3:505-8. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Measuring support and finding unsupported relationships in supertrees
    Mark Wilkinson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Syst Biol 54:823-31. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint The shape of supertrees to come: tree shape related properties of fourteen supertree methods
    Mark Wilkinson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Syst Biol 54:419-31. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Properties of supertree methods in the consensus setting
    Mark Wilkinson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Syst Biol 56:330-7. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Testing the molecular clock: molecular and paleontological estimates of divergence times in the Echinoidea (Echinodermata)
    Andrew B Smith
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 23:1832-51. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Investigating stagnation in morphological phylogenetics using consensus data
    Simon R Harris
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Syst Biol 56:125-9. 2007
  9. pmc The Ediacaran emergence of bilaterians: congruence between the genetic and the geological fossil records
    Kevin J Peterson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:1435-43. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Congruence of morphological and molecular phylogenies
    Davide Pisani
    Department of Biology, The National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co Kildare, Ireland
    Acta Biotheor 55:269-81. 2007

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. pmc The colonization of land by animals: molecular phylogeny and divergence times among arthropods
    Davide Pisani
    NASA Astrobiology Institute and Department of Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    BMC Biol 2:1. 2004
    ..Nine nuclear and 15 mitochondrial genes were used in phylogenetic analyses and 61 genes were used in molecular clock analyses...
  2. ncbi request reprint Identifying and removing fast-evolving sites using compatibility analysis: an example from the Arthropoda
    Davide Pisani
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, United Kingdom
    Syst Biol 53:978-89. 2004
  3. pmc Relative time scales reveal multiple origins of parallel disjunct distributions of African caecilian amphibians
    Simon P Loader
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Biol Lett 3:505-8. 2007
    ..Relative dating analysis reveals the potential complexity of causes of parallel distributions and cautions against inferring common cause from common spatial patterns without considering the temporal dimension...
  4. ncbi request reprint Measuring support and finding unsupported relationships in supertrees
    Mark Wilkinson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Syst Biol 54:823-31. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint The shape of supertrees to come: tree shape related properties of fourteen supertree methods
    Mark Wilkinson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Syst Biol 54:419-31. 2005
    ..Use of multiple methods and/or weighting schemes may allow practical assessment of the extent to which inferences from real data depend upon methodological biases with respect to input tree shape or size...
  6. ncbi request reprint Properties of supertree methods in the consensus setting
    Mark Wilkinson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Syst Biol 56:330-7. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Testing the molecular clock: molecular and paleontological estimates of divergence times in the Echinoidea (Echinodermata)
    Andrew B Smith
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
    Mol Biol Evol 23:1832-51. 2006
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Investigating stagnation in morphological phylogenetics using consensus data
    Simon R Harris
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Syst Biol 56:125-9. 2007
  9. pmc The Ediacaran emergence of bilaterians: congruence between the genetic and the geological fossil records
    Kevin J Peterson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:1435-43. 2008
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Congruence of morphological and molecular phylogenies
    Davide Pisani
    Department of Biology, The National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co Kildare, Ireland
    Acta Biotheor 55:269-81. 2007
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Supertrees disentangle the chimerical origin of eukaryotic genomes
    Davide Pisani
    Department of Biology, The National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland, UK
    Mol Biol Evol 24:1752-60. 2007
    ..The results reject all but two of the current hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes: those assuming a sulfur-dependent or hydrogen-dependent syntrophy for the origin of mitochondria...
  12. ncbi request reprint Matrix representation with parsimony, taxonomic congruence, and total evidence
    Davide Pisani
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
    Syst Biol 51:151-5. 2002
  13. pmc Dinosaurs and the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution
    Graeme T Lloyd
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:2483-90. 2008
    ..Furthermore, we conclude that dinosaurs did not experience a progressive decline at the end of the Cretaceous, nor was their evolution driven directly by the KTR...
  14. ncbi request reprint Molecular evidence for dim-light vision in the last common ancestor of the vertebrates
    Davide Pisani
    Curr Biol 16:R318-9; author reply R320. 2006
  15. pmc A supertree of temnospondyli: cladogenetic patterns in the most species-rich group of early tetrapods
    Marcello Ruta
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:3087-95. 2007
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Genetics. Paradigm for life
    James O McInerney
    Department of Biology, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland
    Science 318:1390-1. 2007
  17. pmc A genus-level supertree of the Dinosauria
    Davide Pisani
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 269:915-21. 2002
    ..Here, we present a very inclusive generic-level supertree of Dinosauria (covering a total of 277 genera), which is remarkably well resolved and provides some clarity in many contentious areas of dinosaur systematics...
  18. doi request reprint The prokaryotic tree of life: past, present... and future?
    James O McInerney
    Department of Biology, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland
    Trends Ecol Evol 23:276-81. 2008
    ..Horizontal gene transfer is now known to be a significant influence on genome evolution. The next decade is likely to resolve whether or not we retain the centuries-old metaphor of the tree for all of life...