Peter D Olson

Summary

Affiliation: The Natural History Museum
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Evidence for host-specific clades of tetraphyllidean tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Eucestoda) revealed by analysis of 18S ssrDNA
    P D Olson
    The Natural History Museum, Department of Zoology, London, UK
    Int J Parasitol 29:1465-76. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Hox genes and the parasitic flatworms: new opportunities, challenges and lessons from the free-living
    P D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Parasitol Int 57:8-17. 2008
  3. doi request reprint On the position of Archigetes and its bearing on the early evolution of the tapeworms
    P D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    J Parasitol 94:898-904. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint Lethal invasive cestodiasis in immunosuppressed patients
    Peter D Olson
    Parasitic Worms Division, Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
    J Infect Dis 187:1962-6. 2003
  5. doi request reprint Evolution of the trypanorhynch tapeworms: parasite phylogeny supports independent lineages of sharks and rays
    Peter D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW75BD, UK
    Int J Parasitol 40:223-42. 2010
  6. pmc Description of Hymenolepis microstoma (Nottingham strain): a classical tapeworm model for research in the genomic era
    Lucas J Cunningham
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Parasit Vectors 3:123. 2010
  7. ncbi request reprint Advances and trends in the molecular systematics of the parasitic Platyhelminthes
    Peter D Olson
    Division of Parasitology, Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Adv Parasitol 60:165-243. 2005
  8. doi request reprint Wnt gene loss in flatworms
    Nick Riddiford
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Dev Genes Evol 221:187-97. 2011
  9. ncbi request reprint Evidence for the co-existence of separate strains or species of Ligula in Lough Neagh, Northern Ireland
    P D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The National History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, UK
    J Helminthol 76:171-4. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Extraordinary host switching in siphonostomatoid copepods and the demise of the Monstrilloida: integrating molecular data, ontogeny and antennulary morphology
    Rony Huys
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 43:368-78. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. ncbi request reprint Evidence for host-specific clades of tetraphyllidean tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Eucestoda) revealed by analysis of 18S ssrDNA
    P D Olson
    The Natural History Museum, Department of Zoology, London, UK
    Int J Parasitol 29:1465-76. 1999
    ..Relationships suggested by both methods of analysis reflected common host associations of the taxa better than their current classification, suggesting that coevolution has had a significant role in the evolution of the group...
  2. ncbi request reprint Hox genes and the parasitic flatworms: new opportunities, challenges and lessons from the free-living
    P D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Parasitol Int 57:8-17. 2008
    ....
  3. doi request reprint On the position of Archigetes and its bearing on the early evolution of the tapeworms
    P D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    J Parasitol 94:898-904. 2008
    ..in the invertebrate host, and similar examples in members of the Spathebothriidea, are the result of progenesis and have little if any bearing on understanding the protocestode condition...
  4. ncbi request reprint Lethal invasive cestodiasis in immunosuppressed patients
    Peter D Olson
    Parasitic Worms Division, Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
    J Infect Dis 187:1962-6. 2003
    ..A prior report of this case nearly 30 years ago, based on tissue examination, had suggested that the parasite was a sparganum...
  5. doi request reprint Evolution of the trypanorhynch tapeworms: parasite phylogeny supports independent lineages of sharks and rays
    Peter D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW75BD, UK
    Int J Parasitol 40:223-42. 2010
    ..The erection and definition of the suborders Trypanobatoida and Trypanoselachoida, for the major clades of trypanorhynchs parasitizing primarily rays and sharks, respectively, is proposed for the two primary lineages recovered here...
  6. pmc Description of Hymenolepis microstoma (Nottingham strain): a classical tapeworm model for research in the genomic era
    Lucas J Cunningham
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Parasit Vectors 3:123. 2010
    ..abstract:..
  7. ncbi request reprint Advances and trends in the molecular systematics of the parasitic Platyhelminthes
    Peter D Olson
    Division of Parasitology, Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Adv Parasitol 60:165-243. 2005
    ..The final section considers future directions in the field, including taxon sampling, molecular targets of choice, and the current and future utility of mitochondrial and nuclear genomics in systematic study...
  8. doi request reprint Wnt gene loss in flatworms
    Nick Riddiford
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Dev Genes Evol 221:187-97. 2011
    ..The distribution of Wnt subfamilies in animals corroborates the idea that the last common ancestor of the Cnidaria and Bilateria possessed all contemporary Wnts and highlights the extent of gene loss in flatworms...
  9. ncbi request reprint Evidence for the co-existence of separate strains or species of Ligula in Lough Neagh, Northern Ireland
    P D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The National History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, UK
    J Helminthol 76:171-4. 2002
    ..The co-existence of separate strains or species of Ligula in Lough Neagh probably resulted from the introduction of R. rutilus to these waters, correlated with an increase in the number of great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus)...
  10. ncbi request reprint Extraordinary host switching in siphonostomatoid copepods and the demise of the Monstrilloida: integrating molecular data, ontogeny and antennulary morphology
    Rony Huys
    Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 43:368-78. 2007
    ..The homoplastic evolution of the frontal filament in Siphonostomatoida is discussed...
  11. ncbi request reprint The plerocercus of Ditrachybothridium macrocephalum Rees, 1959 from two deep-sea elasmobranchs, with a molecular analysis of its position within the order Diphyllidea and a checklist of the hosts of larval diphyllideans
    Rodney A Bray
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Syst Parasitol 59:159-67. 2004
    ..A list of published records of larval diphyllideans, their hosts and localities is included...
  12. doi request reprint RNA-mediated gene suppression and in vitro culture in Hymenolepis microstoma
    Natalia N Pouchkina-Stantcheva
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
    Int J Parasitol 43:641-6. 2013
    ..These studies demonstrate the viability of RNAi in H. microstoma and extend the utility of the model for research in the genomic era...
  13. doi request reprint Spatial and temporal consistency of putative reference genes for real-time PCR in a model tapeworm
    Natalia N Pouchkina-Stantcheva
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW75BD, United Kingdom
    Mol Biochem Parasitol 180:120-2. 2011
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Interrelationships and evolution of the tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda)
    P D Olson
    Parasitic Worms Division, Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, United Kingdom
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 19:443-67. 2001
    ..Inferences are made regarding a monozoic (nonsegmented) origin of the Eucestoda as represented by the Caryophyllidea and for the evolution of the strobilate and acetabulate/tetrafossate conditions having evolved in a stepwise pattern...
  15. ncbi request reprint The phylogeny of the Schistosomatidae based on three genes with emphasis on the interrelationships of Schistosoma Weinland, 1858
    A E Lockyer
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Parasitology 126:203-24. 2003
    ..ocellata and T. szidati, seem to be synonymous. The position of Orientobilharzia within the Schistosoma is confirmed, as is an Asian origin for the Schistosoma, followed by subsequent dispersal through India and Africa...
  16. ncbi request reprint Phylogeny and classification of the Digenea (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda)
    P D Olson
    Parasitic Worms Division, Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Int J Parasitol 33:733-55. 2003
    ..Therefore, the membership of established higher taxa are emended, new taxa erected and a revised, phylogenetically based classification proposed and discussed in light of ontogeny, morphology and taxonomic history...
  17. ncbi request reprint Two new species of Litobothrium Dailey, 1969 (Cestoda: Litobothriidea) from thresher sharks in the Gulf of California, Mexico, with redescriptions of two species in the genus
    P D Olson
    Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Syst Parasitol 48:159-77. 2001
    ..A key to the species is included...
  18. ncbi request reprint Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Microphalloidea Ward, 1901 (Trematoda: Digenea)
    Vasyl V Tkach
    Department of Biology, University of North Dakota Grand Forks, PO Box 9019, Grand Forks, ND 58202 9019, USA
    Syst Parasitol 56:1-15. 2003
    ..Previous systematic schemes are discussed from the viewpoint of present results, and perspectives of future studies are outlined...
  19. ncbi request reprint Morphological and molecular differentiation between Dicrocoelium dendriticum (Rudolphi, 1819) and Dicrocoelium chinensis (Sudarikov and Ryjikov, 1951) Tang and Tang, 1978 (Platyhelminthes: Digenea)
    Domenico Otranto
    Department of Animal Health and Welfare, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 70010 Valenzano, Bari, Italy
    Acta Trop 104:91-8. 2007
    ..dendriticum and D. chinensis as two distinct digeneans infecting ruminants. The implications on the separate status of D. chinensis on the etiology, biology and diagnosis of dicrocoeliosis are discussed...
  20. ncbi request reprint Life cycle evolution in the digenea: a new perspective from phylogeny
    Thomas H Cribb
    Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Centre for Marine Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, 4072 Australia
    Adv Parasitol 54:197-254. 2003
    ..Diplostomida have no adult stages in fishes except by life cycle abbreviation. We present and test a radical hypothesis that the blood-fluke cycle is plesiomorphic within the Diplostomida...
  21. ncbi request reprint First record of metacestodes of Mesocestoides sp. in the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) in Europe, with an 18S rDNA characterisation of the isolate
    Ivan Literak
    Department of Biology and Wildlife Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackeho 1 3, 612 42 Brno, Czech Republic
    Folia Parasitol (Praha) 51:45-9. 2004
    ..A number of distinct clades were recognized, with metacestodes from L. agilis showing the highest degree of relative divergence...