Richard J Butler

Summary

Affiliation: The Natural History Museum
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc A primitive ornithischian dinosaur from the Late Triassic of South Africa, and the early evolution and diversification of Ornithischia
    Richard J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:2041-6. 2007
  2. doi request reprint Palaeoenvironmental controls on the distribution of Cretaceous herbivorous dinosaurs
    Richard J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 95:1027-32. 2008
  3. doi request reprint Body size evolution in Mesozoic birds: little evidence for Cope's rule
    R J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    J Evol Biol 21:1673-82. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Testing co-evolutionary hypotheses over geological timescales: interactions between Mesozoic non-avian dinosaurs and cycads
    Richard J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 84:73-89. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Diversity patterns amongst herbivorous dinosaurs and plants during the Cretaceous: implications for hypotheses of dinosaur/angiosperm co-evolution
    R J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    J Evol Biol 22:446-59. 2009
  6. pmc Postcranial skeletal pneumaticity and air-sacs in the earliest pterosaurs
    Richard J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Biol Lett 5:557-60. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Comment on "A well-preserved Archaeopteryx specimen with theropod features"
    Ian J Corfe
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, UK
    Science 313:1238; author reply 1238. 2006

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. pmc A primitive ornithischian dinosaur from the Late Triassic of South Africa, and the early evolution and diversification of Ornithischia
    Richard J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:2041-6. 2007
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Palaeoenvironmental controls on the distribution of Cretaceous herbivorous dinosaurs
    Richard J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 95:1027-32. 2008
    ..g. Marginocephalia, Ankylosauridae) preferentially inhabited more distal environments...
  3. doi request reprint Body size evolution in Mesozoic birds: little evidence for Cope's rule
    R J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    J Evol Biol 21:1673-82. 2008
    ..Cope's rule is not supported in Mesozoic birds by the available data, and body size evolution currently provides no insights into avian survivorship through the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction...
  4. doi request reprint Testing co-evolutionary hypotheses over geological timescales: interactions between Mesozoic non-avian dinosaurs and cycads
    Richard J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, UK
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 84:73-89. 2009
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Diversity patterns amongst herbivorous dinosaurs and plants during the Cretaceous: implications for hypotheses of dinosaur/angiosperm co-evolution
    R J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    J Evol Biol 22:446-59. 2009
    ..This interesting pattern is worthy of further investigation, and it reflects the decline of both stegosaurs and cycadophytes during the Early Cretaceous...
  6. pmc Postcranial skeletal pneumaticity and air-sacs in the earliest pterosaurs
    Richard J Butler
    Department of Palaeontology, The Natural History Museum, London, UK
    Biol Lett 5:557-60. 2009
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Comment on "A well-preserved Archaeopteryx specimen with theropod features"
    Ian J Corfe
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ, UK
    Science 313:1238; author reply 1238. 2006
    ..We investigate the statistical support for this phylogenetic hypothesis and show that it is no better supported by available morphological character data than the hypothesis of a single avian origin...