John R Hutchinson

Summary

Affiliation: Royal Veterinary College
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc On the inference of function from structure using biomechanical modelling and simulation of extinct organisms
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK
    Biol Lett 8:115-8. 2012
  2. doi request reprint The evolutionary continuum of limb function from early theropods to birds
    John R Hutchinson
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 96:423-48. 2009
  3. ncbi request reprint A 3D interactive method for estimating body segmental parameters in animals: application to the turning and running performance of Tyrannosaurus rex
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5450, USA
    J Theor Biol 246:660-80. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint The locomotor kinematics of Asian and African elephants: changes with speed and size
    John R Hutchinson
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK
    J Exp Biol 209:3812-27. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. II. Extinct taxa
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Morphol 262:441-61. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. I. Extant taxa
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Morphol 262:421-40. 2004
  7. pmc A computational analysis of limb and body dimensions in Tyrannosaurus rex with implications for locomotion, ontogeny, and growth
    John R Hutchinson
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e26037. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Variation in center of mass estimates for extant sauropsids and its importance for reconstructing inertial properties of extinct archosaurs
    Vivian Allen
    Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 292:1442-61. 2009
  9. pmc Integration of biomechanical compliance, leverage, and power in elephant limbs
    Lei Ren
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, London NW1 0TU, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:7078-82. 2010
  10. doi request reprint The movements of limb segments and joints during locomotion in African and Asian elephants
    Lei Ren
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK
    J Exp Biol 211:2735-51. 2008

Detail Information

Publications32

  1. pmc On the inference of function from structure using biomechanical modelling and simulation of extinct organisms
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK
    Biol Lett 8:115-8. 2012
    ..Fundamentally, more data and more testing of methodology are required for the field to mature and build confidence in its inferences...
  2. doi request reprint The evolutionary continuum of limb function from early theropods to birds
    John R Hutchinson
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 96:423-48. 2009
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint A 3D interactive method for estimating body segmental parameters in animals: application to the turning and running performance of Tyrannosaurus rex
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5450, USA
    J Theor Biol 246:660-80. 2007
    ..rex could turn. Depending on the assumptions, our whole body model integrated with a musculoskeletal model estimates that turning 45 degrees on one leg could be achieved slowly, in about 1-2s...
  4. ncbi request reprint The locomotor kinematics of Asian and African elephants: changes with speed and size
    John R Hutchinson
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK
    J Exp Biol 209:3812-27. 2006
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. II. Extinct taxa
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Morphol 262:441-61. 2004
    ..I discuss what speeds were possible for different theropod dinosaurs, and how running ability evolved in an inverse relationship to body size in archosaurs...
  6. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. I. Extant taxa
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Morphol 262:421-40. 2004
    ..caudofemoralis longus...
  7. pmc A computational analysis of limb and body dimensions in Tyrannosaurus rex with implications for locomotion, ontogeny, and growth
    John R Hutchinson
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e26037. 2011
    ..Overall, the limb "antigravity" muscles may have been as large as or even larger than those of ratite birds, which themselves have the most muscular limbs of any living animal...
  8. doi request reprint Variation in center of mass estimates for extant sauropsids and its importance for reconstructing inertial properties of extinct archosaurs
    Vivian Allen
    Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 292:1442-61. 2009
    ..Nonetheless in the best cases these methods allow rigorous estimation of inertial properties...
  9. pmc Integration of biomechanical compliance, leverage, and power in elephant limbs
    Lei Ren
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, London NW1 0TU, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:7078-82. 2010
    ..To achieve the observed limb compliance and low peak forces, elephants synchronize their limb dynamics in the vertical direction, but incur considerable mechanical costs from limbs working against each other horizontally...
  10. doi request reprint The movements of limb segments and joints during locomotion in African and Asian elephants
    Lei Ren
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK
    J Exp Biol 211:2735-51. 2008
    ..Our database will be helpful for identifying elephants with unusual limb movements, facilitating early recognition of musculoskeletal pathology...
  11. doi request reprint Linking the evolution of body shape and locomotor biomechanics in bird-line archosaurs
    Vivian Allen
    Institut fur Spezielle Zoologie und Evolutionsbiologie, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07743 Jena, Germany
    Nature 497:104-7. 2013
    ....
  12. pmc Functional specialization and ontogenetic scaling of limb anatomy in Alligator mississippiensis
    Vivian Allen
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK
    J Anat 216:423-45. 2010
    ....
  13. pmc Whole-bone scaling of the avian pelvic limb
    Michael Doube
    Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    J Anat 221:21-9. 2012
    ..The discrepancy in the relationship between outer diameter to CSA may underlie birds' reputation for having 'light' bones...
  14. doi request reprint Three-dimensional limb joint mobility in the early tetrapod Ichthyostega
    Stephanie E Pierce
    Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences and Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield AL9 7TA, UK
    Nature 486:523-6. 2012
    ..We conclude that early tetrapods with the skeletal morphology and limb mobility of Ichthyostega were unlikely to have made some of the recently described Middle Devonian trackways...
  15. doi request reprint From flat foot to fat foot: structure, ontogeny, function, and evolution of elephant "sixth toes"
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences and Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK
    Science 334:1699-703. 2011
    ..Thus, elephants co-opted sesamoid bones into a role as false digits and used them for support as they changed their foot posture...
  16. pmc The effects of selective breeding on the architectural properties of the pelvic limb in broiler chickens: a comparative study across modern and ancestral populations
    Heather Paxton
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK
    J Anat 217:153-66. 2010
    ..Our new anatomical data for a wide range of domestic and wild-type chickens is useful in a comparative context and for deeper functional analysis including computer modelling/simulation of limb mechanics...
  17. pmc Trabecular bone scales allometrically in mammals and birds
    Michael Doube
    Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 278:3067-73. 2011
    ..Allometry of bone's trabecular tissue may contribute to the skeleton's ability to withstand load, without incurring the physiological or mechanical costs of increasing bone mass...
  18. doi request reprint Historical perspectives on the evolution of tetrapodomorph movement
    Stephanie E Pierce
    Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences and Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield AL9 7TA, UK
    Integr Comp Biol 53:209-23. 2013
    ..The potential for movement in other known Devonian stem tetrapods is assessed through an anatomical comparison of limb joint morphology-and associated mobility-with Ichthyostega, and deemed to have been quite similar. ..
  19. doi request reprint Statistical parametric mapping of the regional distribution and ontogenetic scaling of foot pressures during walking in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus)
    Olga Panagiotopoulou
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, AL9 7TA, UK
    J Exp Biol 215:1584-93. 2012
    ..We hope that our study will build confidence in the potential clinical and scaling applications of mammalian foot pressures, given our findings in support of a link between regional peak pressures and pathogenesis in elephant feet...
  20. pmc 3D Morphometric and posture study of felid scapulae using statistical shape modelling
    Kai Yu Zhang
    Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e34619. 2012
    ..We infer that this enlargement of the scapular fossa may be a size-related specialization for postural support of the shoulder joint...
  21. ncbi request reprint The evolution of hindlimb tendons and muscles on the line to crown-group birds
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Durand 209, BME, Stanford, CA 94305 4038, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 133:1051-86. 2002
    ..Locomotion evolved in a stepwise pattern that only recently produced the derived limb control mechanisms of crown-group birds, such as the strongly flexed hip and knee joints...
  22. ncbi request reprint Biomechanics: Are fast-moving elephants really running?
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    Nature 422:493-4. 2003
  23. pmc Three-dimensional geometric analysis of felid limb bone allometry
    Michael Doube
    Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 4:e4742. 2009
    ..We use entire bone volumes from the forelimbs and hindlimbs of Felidae (cats) to investigate regional complexities in bone allometry...
  24. pmc Topsy-turvy locomotion: biomechanical specializations of the elbow in suspended quadrupeds reflect inverted gravitational constraints
    Shin ichi Fujiwara
    The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
    J Anat 219:176-91. 2011
    ..This condition has evolved independently multiple times, attendant with a loss or reduction of the ability to move in normal upright postures...
  25. pmc The three-dimensional locomotor dynamics of African (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) elephants reveal a smooth gait transition at moderate speed
    Lei Ren
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK
    J R Soc Interface 5:195-211. 2008
    ..Hence, they are not as rigid limbed as typically characterized for graviportal animals, and use regular walking as well as at least one form of running gait...
  26. pmc BoneJ: Free and extensible bone image analysis in ImageJ
    Michael Doube
    Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Bone 47:1076-9. 2010
    ..We implemented standard bone measurements in a novel ImageJ plugin, BoneJ, with which we analysed trabecular bone, whole bones and osteocyte lacunae. BoneJ is open source and free for anyone to download, use, modify and distribute...
  27. doi request reprint The gait dynamics of the modern broiler chicken: a cautionary tale of selective breeding
    Heather Paxton
    Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK
    J Exp Biol 216:3237-48. 2013
    ..Broiler chickens seem to have an awkward gait, but some aspects of their dynamics show rather surprising similarities to other avian bipeds. ..
  28. ncbi request reprint Dinosaur locomotion: beyond the bones
    John R Hutchinson
    Nature 440:292-4. 2006
  29. ncbi request reprint Biomechanics: early birds surmount steep slopes
    John R Hutchinson
    Nature 426:777-8. 2003
  30. ncbi request reprint Pelvic and hindlimb musculature of Tyrannosaurus rex (Dinosauria: Theropoda)
    Matthew T Carrano
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 8081, USA
    J Morphol 253:207-28. 2002
    ..rex--the largest known terrestrial biped--this reconstruction also helps to clarify the sequence of character-state change along the line to extant birds...
  31. ncbi request reprint Tyrannosaurus was not a fast runner
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 3140, USA
    Nature 415:1018-21. 2002
    ..Therefore, it is doubtful that Tyrannosaurus and other huge dinosaurs (approximately 6,000 kg) were capable runners or could reach high speeds...
  32. doi request reprint Some basic relationships between density values in cancellous and cortical bone
    Peter Zioupos
    Department of Materials and Applied Science, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, UK
    J Biomech 41:1961-8. 2008
    ..Our findings may have implications not only for the segregation of bone in these two structural forms, but also for the mechanobiological and physiological processes that govern the regulation of compact and trabecular bone areas...