E M Riley

Summary

Affiliation: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Is T-cell priming required for initiation of pathology in malaria infections?
    E M Riley
    Dept of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, UK WC1E 7HT
    Immunol Today 20:228-33. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: a new century of malaria research
    E M Riley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel St, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 95:25-32. 2000
  3. pmc Lack of association between maternal antibody and protection of African infants from malaria infection
    E M Riley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
    Infect Immun 68:5856-63. 2000
  4. pmc Analysis of human antibodies to erythrocyte binding antigen 175 of Plasmodium falciparum
    D M Okenu
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
    Infect Immun 68:5559-66. 2000
  5. pmc Estimating medium- and long-term trends in malaria transmission by using serological markers of malaria exposure
    C J Drakeley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:5108-13. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Do maternally acquired antibodies protect infants from malaria infection?
    E M Riley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Parasite Immunol 23:51-9. 2001
  7. ncbi request reprint Regulating immunity to malaria
    E M Riley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Parasite Immunol 28:35-49. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Glycosylphosphatidylinositols in malaria pathogenesis and immunity: potential for therapeutic inhibition and vaccination
    C S Boutlis
    International Health Program, Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, P O Box 41096, 0811 Casuarina, NT, Australia
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 297:145-85. 2005
  9. pmc Vitamin A supplementation increases ratios of proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory cytokine responses in pregnancy and lactation
    S E Cox
    Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine LSHTM, London, UK
    Clin Exp Immunol 144:392-400. 2006
  10. pmc The war between the malaria parasite and the immune system: immunity, immunoregulation and immunopathology
    K Artavanis-Tsakonas
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Clin Exp Immunol 133:145-52. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. ncbi request reprint Is T-cell priming required for initiation of pathology in malaria infections?
    E M Riley
    Dept of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, UK WC1E 7HT
    Immunol Today 20:228-33. 1999
    ..Here, Eleanor Riley proposes that T-cell priming is required for amplification of the inflammatory response to malaria and that this explains patterns of clinical malaria in both endemic and non-endemic populations...
  2. ncbi request reprint The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: a new century of malaria research
    E M Riley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel St, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 95:25-32. 2000
    ..Sustainable malaria control may require the deployment of a highly effective vaccine, but there is much that can be done in the meantime to reduce the burden of disease...
  3. pmc Lack of association between maternal antibody and protection of African infants from malaria infection
    E M Riley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
    Infect Immun 68:5856-63. 2000
    ..However, all five children who experienced high-density infections (>100 parasites/microl of blood) were seronegative for MSP-1(19) at the time of infection...
  4. pmc Analysis of human antibodies to erythrocyte binding antigen 175 of Plasmodium falciparum
    D M Okenu
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
    Infect Immun 68:5559-66. 2000
    ..However, there was a trend indicating that individuals with high levels of IgG to region II may have some protection...
  5. pmc Estimating medium- and long-term trends in malaria transmission by using serological markers of malaria exposure
    C J Drakeley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:5108-13. 2005
    ..Thus, serological tools allow us to detect variations in malaria transmission over time. Such tools will be invaluable for monitoring trends in malaria endemicity and the effectiveness of malaria control programs...
  6. ncbi request reprint Do maternally acquired antibodies protect infants from malaria infection?
    E M Riley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Parasite Immunol 23:51-9. 2001
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Regulating immunity to malaria
    E M Riley
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Parasite Immunol 28:35-49. 2006
    ..A detailed understanding of the interplay between these different immunoregulatory processes may facilitate the rationale design of vaccines and novel therapeutics...
  8. ncbi request reprint Glycosylphosphatidylinositols in malaria pathogenesis and immunity: potential for therapeutic inhibition and vaccination
    C S Boutlis
    International Health Program, Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, P O Box 41096, 0811 Casuarina, NT, Australia
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 297:145-85. 2005
    ..P. falciparum GPIs are potentially amenable to specific therapeutic inhibition and vaccination; more needs to be known about their dual roles in malaria pathogenesis and protection for these strategies to succeed...
  9. pmc Vitamin A supplementation increases ratios of proinflammatory to anti-inflammatory cytokine responses in pregnancy and lactation
    S E Cox
    Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine LSHTM, London, UK
    Clin Exp Immunol 144:392-400. 2006
    ....
  10. pmc The war between the malaria parasite and the immune system: immunity, immunoregulation and immunopathology
    K Artavanis-Tsakonas
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Clin Exp Immunol 133:145-52. 2003
    ..We conclude by proposing a model of antimalarial immunity which integrates both the immunological and epidemiological data collected to date...
  11. pmc Apolipoprotein E polymorphisms and risk of malaria
    M A Wozniak
    Department of Optometry and Neuroscience, UMIST, Manchester, UK
    J Med Genet 41:145-6. 2004
  12. ncbi request reprint Absolute levels and ratios of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro predict clinical immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria
    D Dodoo
    Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
    J Infect Dis 185:971-9. 2002
    ..These data contradict data from cross-sectional clinical studies and indicate a need for detailed analysis of the relationship between cellular immunity to malaria and resistance to disease...
  13. pmc Changes in cytokine production associated with acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria
    M S Rhee
    Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
    Clin Exp Immunol 126:503-10. 2001
    ....
  14. pmc Does apolipoprotein E polymorphism influence susceptibility to malaria?
    M A Wozniak
    Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Optometry and Neuroscience, UMIST, Manchester, UK
    J Med Genet 40:348-51. 2003
    ..Parasite densities, all of which were low, did not differ significantly. This effect, although based on small numbers, suggests that APOE epsilon 2 may be a risk factor for early infection...