Christopher Curtis

Summary

Affiliation: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc An experimental hut evaluation of Olyset nets against anopheline mosquitoes after seven years use in Tanzanian villages
    Robert C Malima
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, WC1E 7HT, London, UK
    Malar J 7:38. 2008
  2. pmc Experimental hut evaluation of bednets treated with an organophosphate (chlorpyrifos-methyl) or a pyrethroid (lambdacyhalothrin) alone and in combination against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes
    Alex N Asidi
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, WC1E 7HT, UK
    Malar J 4:25. 2005
  3. pmc Comparison of coverage with insecticide-treated nets in a Tanzanian town and villages where nets and insecticide are either marketed or provided free of charge
    C A Maxwell
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Malar J 5:44. 2006
  4. pmc Variation of malaria transmission and morbidity with altitude in Tanzania and with introduction of alphacypermethrin treated nets
    Caroline A Maxwell
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Malar J 2:28. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Should DDT be banned by international treaty?
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, UK WC1E 7HT
    Parasitol Today 16:119-21. 2000
  6. ncbi request reprint Insecticide-treated nets against malaria vectors and polystyrene beads against Culex larvae
    Chris Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Trends Parasitol 21:504-7. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Insecticide treated nets: impact on vector populations and relevance of initial intensity of transmission and pyrethroid resistance
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, U K
    J Vector Borne Dis 40:1-8. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Scaling-up coverage with insecticide-treated nets against malaria in Africa: who should pay?
    Christopher Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Lancet Infect Dis 3:304-7. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Restoration of malaria control in the Madagascar highlands by DDT spraying
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Disease Control and Vector Biology Unit, United Kingdom
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 66:1. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Infectious disease. The case for deemphasizing genomics in malaria control
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, U K
    Science 290:1508. 2000

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. pmc An experimental hut evaluation of Olyset nets against anopheline mosquitoes after seven years use in Tanzanian villages
    Robert C Malima
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, WC1E 7HT, London, UK
    Malar J 7:38. 2008
    ..It has not been determined for how long Olyset nets remain protective against mosquitoes in household use...
  2. pmc Experimental hut evaluation of bednets treated with an organophosphate (chlorpyrifos-methyl) or a pyrethroid (lambdacyhalothrin) alone and in combination against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes
    Alex N Asidi
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, WC1E 7HT, UK
    Malar J 4:25. 2005
    ..Certain compounds of an earlier generation of insecticides, the organophosphates may have potential as net treatments...
  3. pmc Comparison of coverage with insecticide-treated nets in a Tanzanian town and villages where nets and insecticide are either marketed or provided free of charge
    C A Maxwell
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Malar J 5:44. 2006
    ..There is much emphasis on social marketing as a means of scaling up coverage with insecticide-treated nets and the question has arisen whether nets provided free-of-charge will be looked after by householders...
  4. pmc Variation of malaria transmission and morbidity with altitude in Tanzania and with introduction of alphacypermethrin treated nets
    Caroline A Maxwell
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Malar J 2:28. 2003
    ..It has been argued that vector control should not be attempted in areas of intense transmission...
  5. ncbi request reprint Should DDT be banned by international treaty?
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, UK WC1E 7HT
    Parasitol Today 16:119-21. 2000
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Insecticide-treated nets against malaria vectors and polystyrene beads against Culex larvae
    Chris Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Trends Parasitol 21:504-7. 2005
    ..However, although polystyrene beads have been demonstrated to work extremely well, they have yet to be taken up on a major scale...
  7. ncbi request reprint Insecticide treated nets: impact on vector populations and relevance of initial intensity of transmission and pyrethroid resistance
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, U K
    J Vector Borne Dis 40:1-8. 2003
    ..In Tanzania, pyrethroid resistance has not been detected in malaria vectors, but it has emerged in bedbugs after seven years use of treated nets...
  8. ncbi request reprint Scaling-up coverage with insecticide-treated nets against malaria in Africa: who should pay?
    Christopher Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Lancet Infect Dis 3:304-7. 2003
    ..This expenditure is affordable by the world community as a whole, but not by its poorest members. Recently, funding of this order of magnitude has been committed by donor agencies for malaria control...
  9. ncbi request reprint Restoration of malaria control in the Madagascar highlands by DDT spraying
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Disease Control and Vector Biology Unit, United Kingdom
    Am J Trop Med Hyg 66:1. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Infectious disease. The case for deemphasizing genomics in malaria control
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, U K
    Science 290:1508. 2000
    ..Chris Curtis presents an opposing viewpoint, that low-tech control approaches are the practical ones under current conditions...
  11. ncbi request reprint Biological problems with the replacement of a vector population by Plasmodium-refractory mosquitoes
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK
    Parassitologia 41:479-81. 1999
    ..Thus any scheme, for malaria transmission control by replacement of vectors by genetically-manipulated non-vectors, would have to be able to replace more than one species...
  12. ncbi request reprint Use of floating layers of polystyrene beads to control populations of the filaria vector Culex quinquefasciatus
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK
    Ann Trop Med Parasitol 96:S97-104. 2002
    ..Where Cx. quinquefasciatus breeding in pits form a major component of the vector population, use of polystyrene-bead layers could assist considerably in the process of eliminating lymphatic filariasis by mass drug administration...
  13. pmc Comparison of house spraying and insecticide-treated nets for malaria control
    C F Curtis
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, England
    Bull World Health Organ 78:1389-400. 2000
    ..The importance of high population coverage is emphasized, and the advantages of providing treatment free of charge, rather than charging individuals, are pointed out...
  14. ncbi request reprint Measuring the efficacy of insecticide treated bednets: the use of DNA fingerprinting to increase the accuracy of personal protection estimates in Tanzania
    Seyi Soremekun
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
    Trop Med Int Health 9:664-72. 2004
    ..When these percentages were used to adjust estimates of personal protection, it was found that the error due to mosquitoes not feeding in the rooms in which they were collected is negligible...
  15. pmc Infectious reservoir of Plasmodium infection in Mae Hong Son Province, north-west Thailand
    Aree Pethleart
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, WC1E 7HT, UK
    Malar J 3:34. 2004
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint WHO, the Global Fund, and medical malpractice in malaria treatment
    Amir Attaran
    Royal Institute of International Affairs, London, UK
    Lancet 363:237-40. 2004
  17. ncbi request reprint DEET mosquito repellent provides personal protection against malaria: a household randomized trial in an Afghan refugee camp in Pakistan
    Mark Rowland
    HealthNet International, Peshawar, Pakistan
    Trop Med Int Health 9:335-42. 2004
    ..There is a case for giving repellents more prominence in public health as a preventive measure in regions where vectors bite in the early evening or in emergency situations such as epidemics or newly established refugee camps...
  18. ncbi request reprint Mosquito behavior and vector control
    Helen Pates
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
    Annu Rev Entomol 50:53-70. 2005
    ..Prospects for genetic control by sterile males or genes rendering mosquitoes harmless to humans will depend on competitive mating behavior. These methods are hampered by the immigration of monogamous, already-mated females...
  19. pmc Malaria control and public health
    Donald Roberts
    Emerg Infect Dis 10:1170-1; author reply 1171-2. 2004
  20. doi request reprint Obituary: Christopher Curtis (1939-2008)
    Indira Nath
    Indira Nath is in the LEPRA Blue Peter Research Centre, Cherlapally, Hyderabad 501301, India
    Nature 453:1002. 2008