Richard D Bardgett

Summary

Affiliation: Lancaster University
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Preferences for different nitrogen forms by coexisting plant species and soil microbes
    Kathryn A Harrison
    Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK
    Ecology 88:989-99. 2007
  2. doi request reprint Litter evenness influences short-term peatland decomposition processes
    Susan E Ward
    Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
    Oecologia 164:511-20. 2010
  3. pmc Plant-soil interactions in a changing world
    Richard D Bardgett
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University Lancaster, LA1 4YQ UK
    F1000 Biol Rep 3:16. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Microbial contributions to climate change through carbon cycle feedbacks
    Richard D Bardgett
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
    ISME J 2:805-14. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Parasitic plants indirectly regulate below-ground properties in grassland ecosystems
    Richard D Bardgett
    Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK
    Nature 439:969-72. 2006
  6. pmc Increased plant carbon translocation linked to overyielding in grassland species mixtures
    Gerlinde B De Deyn
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e45926. 2012
  7. pmc Extensive management promotes plant and microbial nitrogen retention in temperate grassland
    Franciska T de Vries
    Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e51201. 2012
  8. ncbi request reprint Warming effects on greenhouse gas fluxes in peatlands are modulated by vegetation composition
    Susan E Ward
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ, UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP, UK
    Ecol Lett 16:1285-93. 2013
  9. pmc Inter-specific competition, but not different soil microbial communities, affects N chemical forms uptake by competing graminoids of upland grasslands
    Eduardo Medina-Roldán
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e51193. 2012
  10. doi request reprint Legacy effects of drought on plant growth and the soil food web
    Franciska Trijntje de Vries
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ, UK
    Oecologia 170:821-33. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. ncbi request reprint Preferences for different nitrogen forms by coexisting plant species and soil microbes
    Kathryn A Harrison
    Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK
    Ecology 88:989-99. 2007
    ..Our data suggest that coexisting plants can outcompete microbes for a variety of N forms, but that such plant species show similar preferences for inorganic over organic N...
  2. doi request reprint Litter evenness influences short-term peatland decomposition processes
    Susan E Ward
    Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
    Oecologia 164:511-20. 2010
    ..Our findings highlight the importance of changes in the evenness of plant community composition for short-term decomposition processes in UK peatlands...
  3. pmc Plant-soil interactions in a changing world
    Richard D Bardgett
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University Lancaster, LA1 4YQ UK
    F1000 Biol Rep 3:16. 2011
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Microbial contributions to climate change through carbon cycle feedbacks
    Richard D Bardgett
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
    ISME J 2:805-14. 2008
    ..In particular, we highlight the need for a multifactor experimental approach to understand how soil microbes and their activities respond to climate change and consequences for carbon cycle feedbacks...
  5. ncbi request reprint Parasitic plants indirectly regulate below-ground properties in grassland ecosystems
    Richard D Bardgett
    Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK
    Nature 439:969-72. 2006
    ..Our study provides evidence that parasitic plants act as a major driver of both above-ground and below-ground properties of grassland ecosystems...
  6. pmc Increased plant carbon translocation linked to overyielding in grassland species mixtures
    Gerlinde B De Deyn
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e45926. 2012
    ..These results demonstrate a mechanistic coupling between changes in intraspecific plant carbon physiology and increased community level productivity in grassland systems...
  7. pmc Extensive management promotes plant and microbial nitrogen retention in temperate grassland
    Franciska T de Vries
    Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e51201. 2012
    ..Moreover, they support the notion that microbial communities might be the key to improved N retention through tightening linkages between plants and microbes and reducing N availability...
  8. ncbi request reprint Warming effects on greenhouse gas fluxes in peatlands are modulated by vegetation composition
    Susan E Ward
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ, UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP, UK
    Ecol Lett 16:1285-93. 2013
    ....
  9. pmc Inter-specific competition, but not different soil microbial communities, affects N chemical forms uptake by competing graminoids of upland grasslands
    Eduardo Medina-Roldán
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e51193. 2012
    ..Our results also suggest that coexistence of these species in mountain grasslands is likely based on non-equilibrium mechanisms such as disturbance and/or soil heterogeneity...
  10. doi request reprint Legacy effects of drought on plant growth and the soil food web
    Franciska Trijntje de Vries
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ, UK
    Oecologia 170:821-33. 2012
    ..Our results show that plant belowground inputs have the potential to affect the recovery of belowground communities after drought, with implications for the functions they perform, such as C and N cycling...
  11. doi request reprint Abiotic drivers and plant traits explain landscape-scale patterns in soil microbial communities
    Franciska T de Vries
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
    Ecol Lett 15:1230-9. 2012
    ....
  12. pmc Soil food web properties explain ecosystem services across European land use systems
    Franciska T de Vries
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:14296-301. 2013
    ....
  13. pmc Plant species richness, identity and productivity differentially influence key groups of microbes in grassland soils of contrasting fertility
    Gerlinde B De Deyn
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK
    Biol Lett 7:75-8. 2011
    ..This suggests that AMF abundance in soil is more sensitive to changes in plant species diversity per se and plant species composition than are abundances of saprophytic microbes...
  14. doi request reprint Plant functional traits and soil carbon sequestration in contrasting biomes
    Gerlinde B De Deyn
    Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Soil and Ecosystem Ecology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK
    Ecol Lett 11:516-31. 2008
    ..We propose that a trait-based approach will help to develop strategies to preserve and promote carbon sequestration...
  15. pmc Heterotrophic microbial communities use ancient carbon following glacial retreat
    Richard D Bardgett
    Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK
    Biol Lett 3:487-90. 2007
    ..Our findings suggest the existence of an initial stage of heterotrophic microbial community development that precedes autotrophic community assembly and is sustained, in part, by ancient carbon...
  16. doi request reprint Grazing-induced effects on soil properties modify plant competitive interactions in semi-natural mountain grasslands
    Eduardo Medina-Roldán
    Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ, UK
    Oecologia 170:159-69. 2012
    ..Finally, we discuss the relevance of our findings for plant community dynamics in grazed, semi-natural grasslands...
  17. pmc Direct uptake of soil nitrogen by mosses
    Edward Ayres
    Lancaster University, Soil and Ecosystem Ecology Laboratory, Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK
    Biol Lett 2:286-8. 2006
    ..Finally, soil N uptake may place some moss species at greater risk from N pollution than previously appreciated...
  18. ncbi request reprint The impact of synthetic pyrethroid and organophosphate sheep dip formulations on microbial activity in soil
    Tatiana K Boucard
    Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
    Environ Pollut 153:207-14. 2008
    ..01% SP- or OP-amended soils. This study suggests that the growth, activity, physiological status and/or structure of soil microbial community may be affected by sheep dips...
  19. ncbi request reprint Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbon
    James Heath
    Department of Biological Sciences, Institute of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YQ, UK
    Science 309:1711-3. 2005
    ....
  20. doi request reprint Large old trees influence patterns of delta13C and delta15N in forests
    Pascale Weber
    Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Zuercherstrasse 111, CH 8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 22:1627-30. 2008
    ..Our results indicate that large old trees control below-ground conditions in their immediate surroundings, and that stable isotopes might act as markers for the spatial and temporal extent of these below-ground effects...
  21. ncbi request reprint Ecosystem properties and forest decline in contrasting long-term chronosequences
    David A Wardle
    Department of Forest Vegetation Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE901 83 Umeå, Sweden
    Science 305:509-13. 2004
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Preferential uptake of soil nitrogen forms by grassland plant species
    Alexandra Weigelt
    Chair of Biogeography, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany
    Oecologia 142:627-35. 2005
    ..Our findings indicate that species-specific differences in direct uptake of different N forms combined with total N acquisition could explain changes in competitive dominance of grass species in grasslands of differing fertility...
  23. ncbi request reprint Soil invertebrates disrupt carbon flow through fungal networks
    David Johnson
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, UK
    Science 309:1047. 2005
    ..Our findings emphasize the importance of multitrophic interactions in regulating respiration of recent plant photosynthate from soil...
  24. ncbi request reprint Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function
    Pete Manning
    Natural Environment Research Council Centre for Population Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, UK
    Ecol Lett 9:1015-24. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that direct effects of N deposition on ecosystem function could be relatively strong in comparison with the indirect effects of plant community change...
  25. ncbi request reprint Ecological linkages between aboveground and belowground biota
    David A Wardle
    Landcare Research, Post Office Box 69, Lincoln, New Zealand
    Science 304:1629-33. 2004
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint The unseen majority: soil microbes as drivers of plant diversity and productivity in terrestrial ecosystems
    Marcel G A van der Heijden
    Department of Animal Ecology, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Institute of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Ecol Lett 11:296-310. 2008
    ..Overall, this review shows that soil microbes must be considered as important drivers of plant diversity and productivity in terrestrial ecosystems...
  27. ncbi request reprint Exploitation of immunofluorescence for the quantification and characterization of small numbers of Pasteuria endospores
    Sofia R Costa
    Nematode Interactions Unit, Rhizosphere Biology Programme, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, UK
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 58:593-600. 2006
    ..Based on visual assessment of endospore fluorescence, a quantitative method was developed to characterize endospore populations, which were shown to vary according to their host...