Petroula Proitsi

Summary

Affiliation: King's College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Missense substitutions associated with behavioural disturbances in Alzheimer's disease (AD)
    Petroula Proitsi
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK
    Brain Res Bull 88:394-405. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Alzheimer's disease and age-related macular degeneration have different genetic models for complement gene variation
    Petroula Proitsi
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London, UK
    Neurobiol Aging 33:1843.e9-17. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Association of serotonin and dopamine gene pathways with behavioral subphenotypes in dementia
    Petroula Proitsi
    Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, London, UK
    Neurobiol Aging 33:791-803. 2012
  4. doi request reprint A blood gene expression marker of early Alzheimer's disease
    Katie Lunnon
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, King s Health Partners Centre for Neurodegeneration Research, London, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 33:737-53. 2013
  5. doi request reprint Entorhinal cortex thickness predicts cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease
    Latha Velayudhan
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, London, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 33:755-66. 2013
  6. pmc Deep sequencing of the Nicastrin gene in pooled DNA, the identification of genetic variants that affect risk of Alzheimer's disease
    Michelle K Lupton
    MRC Centre for Neurodegeneration Research, Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e17298. 2011
  7. doi request reprint Combinatorial markers of mild cognitive impairment conversion to Alzheimer's disease--cytokines and MRI measures together predict disease progression
    Simon J Furney
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry and National Institute of Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, London, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 26:395-405. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Alzheimer's disease susceptibility variants in the MS4A6A gene are associated with altered levels of MS4A6A expression in blood
    Petroula Proitsi
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK
    Neurobiol Aging 35:279-90. 2014
  9. doi request reprint The role of ABCA1 gene sequence variants on risk of Alzheimer's disease
    Michelle K Lupton
    Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, London, UK QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia
    J Alzheimers Dis 38:897-906. 2014
  10. doi request reprint Complement activation as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease
    Mohammed Aiyaz
    Kings College London Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London, UK
    Immunobiology 217:204-15. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications17

  1. doi request reprint Missense substitutions associated with behavioural disturbances in Alzheimer's disease (AD)
    Petroula Proitsi
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK
    Brain Res Bull 88:394-405. 2012
    ..Larger studies and more systematic approaches will delineate the association of missense substitutions with behavioural symptoms in AD...
  2. ncbi request reprint Alzheimer's disease and age-related macular degeneration have different genetic models for complement gene variation
    Petroula Proitsi
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London, UK
    Neurobiol Aging 33:1843.e9-17. 2012
    ..Our study provides further support to the hypothesis that while activation of the alternative complement pathway is central to AMD pathogenesis, it is less involved in AD...
  3. doi request reprint Association of serotonin and dopamine gene pathways with behavioral subphenotypes in dementia
    Petroula Proitsi
    Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, London, UK
    Neurobiol Aging 33:791-803. 2012
    ..This multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) model efficiently captured the complexity of the interrelations between genetic variation, behavioral symptoms, and clinical variables...
  4. doi request reprint A blood gene expression marker of early Alzheimer's disease
    Katie Lunnon
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, King s Health Partners Centre for Neurodegeneration Research, London, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 33:737-53. 2013
    ..However, we accept these results could also represent a marker of diseases sharing common etiology...
  5. doi request reprint Entorhinal cortex thickness predicts cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease
    Latha Velayudhan
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, London, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 33:755-66. 2013
    ..Focusing on structural analyses that predict decline can identify those individuals at greatest risk for future cognitive loss. This may have potential for increasing the efficacy of early intervention...
  6. pmc Deep sequencing of the Nicastrin gene in pooled DNA, the identification of genetic variants that affect risk of Alzheimer's disease
    Michelle K Lupton
    MRC Centre for Neurodegeneration Research, Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e17298. 2011
    ..994, CI 1.105-14.439, p = 0.035). This finding warrants further investigation in a larger cohort and adds weight to the hypothesis that rare variation explains some of genetic heritability still to be identified in Alzheimer's disease...
  7. doi request reprint Combinatorial markers of mild cognitive impairment conversion to Alzheimer's disease--cytokines and MRI measures together predict disease progression
    Simon J Furney
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry and National Institute of Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, London, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 26:395-405. 2011
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Alzheimer's disease susceptibility variants in the MS4A6A gene are associated with altered levels of MS4A6A expression in blood
    Petroula Proitsi
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK
    Neurobiol Aging 35:279-90. 2014
    ..Inhibiting MS4A6A may therefore promote a more neuroprotective phenotype, although further work is needed to establish whether this is the case...
  9. doi request reprint The role of ABCA1 gene sequence variants on risk of Alzheimer's disease
    Michelle K Lupton
    Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, London, UK QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia
    J Alzheimers Dis 38:897-906. 2014
    ..In addition they highlight the importance of high throughput sequencing in the identification of rare variation undetected by GWAS, but with the potential to have a strong effect on risk of LOAD. ..
  10. doi request reprint Complement activation as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease
    Mohammed Aiyaz
    Kings College London Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London, UK
    Immunobiology 217:204-15. 2012
    ..An accurate biomarker that has sufficient predictive, diagnostic and prognostic value would provide a significant opportunity to develop and test for effective novel therapies in the treatment of AD...
  11. pmc Association of plasma clusterin concentration with severity, pathology, and progression in Alzheimer disease
    Madhav Thambisetty
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, England
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 67:739-48. 2010
    ..Blood-based analytes may be indicators of pathological processes in Alzheimer disease (AD)...
  12. doi request reprint Candidate blood proteome markers of Alzheimer's disease onset and progression: a systematic review and replication study
    Steven J Kiddle
    King s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health and Biomedical Research Unit for Dementia at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation, London, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 38:515-31. 2014
    ..This suggests that AD pathology does affect the blood proteome with some consistency...
  13. doi request reprint Mitochondrial dysfunction and immune activation are detectable in early Alzheimer's disease blood
    Katie Lunnon
    Institute of Psychiatry, King s Health Partners Centre for Neurodegeneration Research, King s College London, London, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 30:685-710. 2012
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Evidence of altered phosphatidylcholine metabolism in Alzheimer's disease
    Luke Whiley
    Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Institute of Psychiatry, Kings s College London, London, UK
    Neurobiol Aging 35:271-8. 2014
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Cross-region reduction in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in Alzheimer's disease brain
    Daniel Condliffe
    Institute of Psychiatry, King s College London, London, UK
    Neurobiol Aging 35:1850-4. 2014
    ..Our study further implicates a role for epigenetic alterations in AD. ..
  16. doi request reprint Risk of developing dementia in people with diabetes and mild cognitive impairment
    Latha Velayudhan
    National Institute for Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, Section of Old Age Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 196:36-40. 2010
    ..Diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive dysfunction, but it is not clear whether the disorder increases the risk of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to dementia...
  17. ncbi request reprint Positional pathway screen of wnt signaling genes in schizophrenia: association with DKK4
    Petroula Proitsi
    Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King s College, London, United Kingdom
    Biol Psychiatry 63:13-6. 2008
    ..This diverse evidence suggests that wnt signaling genes, defined as pathway participants, modifiers or targets, are good candidates as susceptibility factors...