Peter R Ellis

Summary

Affiliation: King's College London
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint A novel method for classifying starch digestion by modelling the amylolysis of plant foods using first-order enzyme kinetic principles
    Cathrina H Edwards
    Biopolymers Group, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, School of Medicine, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, SE1 9NH, London, UK
    Food Funct 5:2751-8. 2014
  2. ncbi request reprint Role of cell walls in the bioaccessibility of lipids in almond seeds
    Peter R Ellis
    Biopolymers Group, Department of Life Sciences, King s College London, University of London, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NN, UK
    Am J Clin Nutr 80:604-13. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Manipulation of lipid bioaccessibility of almond seeds influences postprandial lipemia in healthy human subjects
    Sarah E E Berry
    King s College London, Nutritional Sciences Division, Franklin Wilkins Building, London, UK
    Am J Clin Nutr 88:922-9. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint A novel xyloglucan from seeds of Afzelia africana Se. Pers.--extraction, characterization, and conformational properties
    Yilong Ren
    Department of Life Sciences, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, UK
    Carbohydr Res 340:997-1005. 2005
  5. pmc Effect of mastication on lipid bioaccessibility of almonds in a randomized human study and its implications for digestion kinetics, metabolizable energy, and postprandial lipemia
    Myriam M L Grundy
    From the Biopolymers Group, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, King s College London, United Kingdom MMLG, TG, PJB, Seeb, and PRE the Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, United Kingdom GM and KWW and the Department of Drug Science and Products for Health, University of Messina, Italy GM
    Am J Clin Nutr 101:25-33. 2015
  6. doi request reprint Infrared spectroscopy with heated attenuated total internal reflectance enabling precise measurement of thermally induced transitions in complex biological polymers
    Frederick J Warren
    King s College London, School of Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH, United Kingdom
    Anal Chem 85:3999-4006. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Studies of the effect of maltose on the direct binding of porcine pancreatic α-amylase to maize starch
    Frederick J Warren
    King s College London, School of Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, London, UK
    Carbohydr Res 358:67-71. 2012
  8. doi request reprint The surface structure of a complex substrate revealed by enzyme kinetics and Freundlich constants for α-amylase interaction with the surface of starch
    Frederick J Warren
    King s College London, School of Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH, UK
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1830:3095-101. 2013
  9. doi request reprint Stability of sugar solutions: a novel study of the epimerization kinetics of lactose in water
    Rim Jawad
    Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, U K
    Mol Pharm 11:2224-38. 2014
  10. doi request reprint Immersion mode material pocket dynamic mechanical analysis (IMP-DMA): a novel tool to study gelatinisation of purified starches and starch-containing plant materials
    Frederick J Warren
    King s College London, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH, United Kingdom
    Carbohydr Polym 90:628-36. 2012

Collaborators

  • David R Picout
  • Sarah E E Berry
  • Giuseppina Mandalari
  • Cyril W C Kendall
  • Richard M Faulks
  • Gary P Martin
  • J S Grant Reid
  • Furio Brighenti
  • Frederick J Warren
  • Peter J Butterworth
  • Terri Grassby
  • Paul G Royall
  • Yilong Ren
  • Andrea R Josse
  • Myriam M L Grundy
  • David J A Jenkins
  • Cathrina H Edwards
  • Hamung Patel
  • Rim Jawad
  • Benjamin B Perston
  • Rumana Tahir
  • Judith A Bryans
  • Livia S A Augustin
  • Simon B Ross-Murphy
  • Keith W Waldron
  • Peter J Milligan
  • Gillian T Rich
  • Richard Day
  • Carole Elleman
  • Suzanne L Slaughter
  • Mireille A Hassoun
  • Martin S J Wickham
  • Alex F Drake
  • Karen Lapsley
  • Tatiana Y Bogracheva
  • Cheryl Meares-Taylor
  • Patricia A Judd
  • A Venket Rao
  • Sara Salvatore
  • Edward Vidgen
  • Elizabeth C Jackson

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. doi request reprint A novel method for classifying starch digestion by modelling the amylolysis of plant foods using first-order enzyme kinetic principles
    Cathrina H Edwards
    Biopolymers Group, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, School of Medicine, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, SE1 9NH, London, UK
    Food Funct 5:2751-8. 2014
    ..Such predictions have implications for prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. ..
  2. ncbi request reprint Role of cell walls in the bioaccessibility of lipids in almond seeds
    Peter R Ellis
    Biopolymers Group, Department of Life Sciences, King s College London, University of London, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NN, UK
    Am J Clin Nutr 80:604-13. 2004
    ..A crucial and relevant aspect is the amount of these dietary components available for absorption in the intestine, which is a concept referred to as bioaccessibility...
  3. ncbi request reprint Manipulation of lipid bioaccessibility of almond seeds influences postprandial lipemia in healthy human subjects
    Sarah E E Berry
    King s College London, Nutritional Sciences Division, Franklin Wilkins Building, London, UK
    Am J Clin Nutr 88:922-9. 2008
    ..Plant cell walls are known to influence the rate and extent of lipid release from plant food tissues during digestion; however, the effect of cell wall structure on postprandial lipemia is unknown...
  4. ncbi request reprint A novel xyloglucan from seeds of Afzelia africana Se. Pers.--extraction, characterization, and conformational properties
    Yilong Ren
    Department of Life Sciences, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, UK
    Carbohydr Res 340:997-1005. 2005
    ..The chain flexibility of the polysaccharide is also discussed in the light of our recent measurements reported elsewhere [Biomacromolecules2004, 5, 2384-2391]...
  5. pmc Effect of mastication on lipid bioaccessibility of almonds in a randomized human study and its implications for digestion kinetics, metabolizable energy, and postprandial lipemia
    Myriam M L Grundy
    From the Biopolymers Group, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, King s College London, United Kingdom MMLG, TG, PJB, Seeb, and PRE the Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, United Kingdom GM and KWW and the Department of Drug Science and Products for Health, University of Messina, Italy GM
    Am J Clin Nutr 101:25-33. 2015
    ..The particle size and structure of masticated almonds have a significant impact on nutrient release (bioaccessibility) and digestion kinetics...
  6. doi request reprint Infrared spectroscopy with heated attenuated total internal reflectance enabling precise measurement of thermally induced transitions in complex biological polymers
    Frederick J Warren
    King s College London, School of Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH, United Kingdom
    Anal Chem 85:3999-4006. 2013
    ..This has the potential to allow more precise determination of the gelatinization parameters of high-amylose starches, for which gelatinization may take place over several tens of °C...
  7. doi request reprint Studies of the effect of maltose on the direct binding of porcine pancreatic α-amylase to maize starch
    Frederick J Warren
    King s College London, School of Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, London, UK
    Carbohydr Res 358:67-71. 2012
    ..5-fold weaker. Because of the relatively low affinity for maltose, it seems unlikely that inhibition by maltose of the initial stage of starch-amylase interaction normally plays any role in regulating intestinal digestion of starch...
  8. doi request reprint The surface structure of a complex substrate revealed by enzyme kinetics and Freundlich constants for α-amylase interaction with the surface of starch
    Frederick J Warren
    King s College London, School of Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH, UK
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1830:3095-101. 2013
    ..Understanding this key step in digestion should help with a molecular understanding for observed differences in starch digestion rates...
  9. doi request reprint Stability of sugar solutions: a novel study of the epimerization kinetics of lactose in water
    Rim Jawad
    Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, U K
    Mol Pharm 11:2224-38. 2014
    ....
  10. doi request reprint Immersion mode material pocket dynamic mechanical analysis (IMP-DMA): a novel tool to study gelatinisation of purified starches and starch-containing plant materials
    Frederick J Warren
    King s College London, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London, SE1 9NH, United Kingdom
    Carbohydr Polym 90:628-36. 2012
    ..Thus, a new hyphenated form of DMA is now available that permits the thermally induced transitions of particle water dispersions to be characterised...
  11. doi request reprint Study of the structure and properties of native and hydrothermally processed wild-type, lam and r variant pea starches that affect amylolysis of these starches
    Rumana Tahir
    Department of Biochemistry, Biopolymers Group, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, United Kingdom
    Biomacromolecules 12:123-33. 2011
    ..It is suggested that the complex behavior for r resulted from amylose gel formation between 60-90 °C. Amorphous amylopectin seems a better substrate for amylase than amorphous amylose...
  12. ncbi request reprint Solution properties of the xyloglucan polymer from Afzelia africana
    Yilong Ren
    Department of Life Sciences, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NN, United Kingdom
    Biomacromolecules 5:2384-91. 2004
    ..Measurement of dilute and semidilute solution rheology suggests that, like these polymers, and the related galactomannan series, it forms viscous solutions at higher concentrations via entanglements...
  13. doi request reprint Modelling of nutrient bioaccessibility in almond seeds based on the fracture properties of their cell walls
    Terri Grassby
    King s College London, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, UK
    Food Funct 5:3096-106. 2014
    ..Further work is warranted to evaluate the efficacy of this model to accurately predict nutrient bioaccessibility in a broad range of edible plants. ..
  14. ncbi request reprint The effect of consuming instant black tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy humans
    Judith A Bryans
    King s College London, School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NN, United Kingdom
    J Am Coll Nutr 26:471-7. 2007
    ..To determine the effects of black tea on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy humans in response to an oral glucose load...
  15. pmc A mechanistic approach to studies of the possible digestion of retrograded starch by α-amylase revealed using a log of slope (LOS) plot
    Hamung Patel
    King s College London, School of Medicine, Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, Biopolymers Group, Franklin Wilkins Building, 150, Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, UK
    Carbohydr Polym 113:182-8. 2014
    ..This suggests that retrograded starch is virtually inert to amylase action. Both k and C∞ were strongly related to the increase in degree of order of the α-glucan chains, monitored by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, in retrograded starch. ..
  16. ncbi request reprint The effect of guar galactomannan and water availability during hydrothermal processing on the hydrolysis of starch catalysed by pancreatic alpha-amylase
    Suzanne L Slaughter
    Biopolymers Group, Division of Life Sciences, King s College London, Franklin Wilkins Building, London, UK
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1571:55-63. 2002
    ..Thus, the effects of sNSP in lowering postprandial glycaemia not only involve modifications of gut physiology, but also include direct inhibition of the first stage in the biochemical degradation of starch...
  17. doi request reprint Release of protein, lipid, and vitamin E from almond seeds during digestion
    Giuseppina Mandalari
    Model Gut Platform and Sustainability of the Food Chain Platform, Institute of Food Research, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    J Agric Food Chem 56:3409-16. 2008
    ..Bioaccessibility is improved by increased residence time in the gut and is regulated by almond cell walls...
  18. ncbi request reprint Almonds and postprandial glycemia--a dose-response study
    Andrea R Josse
    Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5C 2T2
    Metabolism 56:400-4. 2007
    ..0), and 90-g (45.2 +/- 5.8) doses of almonds (r = -0.524, n = 36, P = .001). We conclude that, in addition to lowering serum cholesterol levels, almonds may also reduce the glycemic impact of carbohydrate foods with which they are eaten...
  19. ncbi request reprint Almonds decrease postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and oxidative damage in healthy individuals
    David J A Jenkins
    Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center and 3Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Michael s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5C 2T2, Canada
    J Nutr 136:2987-92. 2006
    ..Almonds are likely to lower this risk by decreasing the glycemic excursion and by providing antioxidants. These actions may relate to mechanisms by which nuts are associated with a decreased risk of CHD...