Elizabeth Pellicano

Summary

Affiliation: Institute of Education
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Bridging autism, science and society: moving toward an ethically informed approach to autism research
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, London, UK
    Autism Res 4:271-82. 2011
  2. doi request reprint Testing the predictive power of cognitive atypicalities in autistic children: evidence from a 3-year follow-up study
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education CRAE, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, UK
    Autism Res 6:258-67. 2013
  3. pmc Reduced gaze aftereffects are related to difficulties categorising gaze direction in children with autism
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, 25 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA UK
    Neuropsychologia 51:1504-9. 2013
  4. doi request reprint When the world becomes 'too real': a Bayesian explanation of autistic perception
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK
    Trends Cogn Sci 16:504-10. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Individual differences in executive function and central coherence predict developmental changes in theory of mind in autism
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, 25 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA, UK
    Dev Psychol 46:530-44. 2010
  6. pmc Children with autism are neither systematic nor optimal foragers
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, London WC1H 0AA, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:421-6. 2011
  7. doi request reprint Mutual eye gaze facilitates person categorization for typically developing children, but not for children with autism
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, London, England
    Psychon Bull Rev 16:1094-9. 2009
  8. doi request reprint The development of core cognitive skills in autism: a 3-year prospective study
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Department of Psychology and Human Development, Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, 25 Woburn Square, London, United Kingdom
    Child Dev 81:1400-16. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Global visual processing and self-rated autistic-like traits
    Emma J Grinter
    School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, WA, Australia
    J Autism Dev Disord 39:1278-90. 2009
  10. doi request reprint Perception of shapes targeting local and global processes in autism spectrum disorders
    Emma J Grinter
    School of Psychology, University of Western Australia
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 51:717-24. 2010

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. ncbi request reprint Bridging autism, science and society: moving toward an ethically informed approach to autism research
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, London, UK
    Autism Res 4:271-82. 2011
    ..We conclude by arguing for a new range of democratic mechanisms that could enable the scientific community, autistics, and other concerned parties to respond collectively to such entrenched ethical disputes...
  2. doi request reprint Testing the predictive power of cognitive atypicalities in autistic children: evidence from a 3-year follow-up study
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education CRAE, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, UK
    Autism Res 6:258-67. 2013
    ..Instead, early variation in executive function plays a key role in helping to shape autistic children's emerging behaviors, including their social communication and repetitive behaviors and interests...
  3. pmc Reduced gaze aftereffects are related to difficulties categorising gaze direction in children with autism
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, 25 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA UK
    Neuropsychologia 51:1504-9. 2013
    ..These results show that the mechanisms coding gaze are less flexible in autism and offer a potential new explanation for these children's difficulties discriminating subtle deviations in gaze direction...
  4. doi request reprint When the world becomes 'too real': a Bayesian explanation of autistic perception
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK
    Trends Cogn Sci 16:504-10. 2012
    ..In this account, we consider how hypo-priors might explain key features of autism - the broad range of sensory and other non-social atypicalities--in addition to the phenomenological differences in autistic perception...
  5. doi request reprint Individual differences in executive function and central coherence predict developmental changes in theory of mind in autism
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, 25 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA, UK
    Dev Psychol 46:530-44. 2010
    ....
  6. pmc Children with autism are neither systematic nor optimal foragers
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, London WC1H 0AA, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:421-6. 2011
    ..Rather, children with autism showed difficulties exploring and exploiting the large-scale space, which might instead be attributed to constraints (rather than benefits) in their cognitive repertoire...
  7. doi request reprint Mutual eye gaze facilitates person categorization for typically developing children, but not for children with autism
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, London, England
    Psychon Bull Rev 16:1094-9. 2009
    ..These findings suggest that difficulties in gaze processing in autism extend beyond sociocommunicative inferences to include basic person-perception judgments...
  8. doi request reprint The development of core cognitive skills in autism: a 3-year prospective study
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Department of Psychology and Human Development, Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, 25 Woburn Square, London, United Kingdom
    Child Dev 81:1400-16. 2010
    ..Moreover, autistic children demonstrated significant changes over time in ToM and EF, but not CC, over the 3-year period. The challenges these findings pose for a multiple-deficits account are discussed...
  9. doi request reprint Global visual processing and self-rated autistic-like traits
    Emma J Grinter
    School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, WA, Australia
    J Autism Dev Disord 39:1278-90. 2009
    ..Overall the results indicate that individuals with high levels of autistic-like traits have difficulties with global integration in the visual pathways, which may at least partly explain their superior EFT performance...
  10. doi request reprint Perception of shapes targeting local and global processes in autism spectrum disorders
    Emma J Grinter
    School of Psychology, University of Western Australia
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 51:717-24. 2010
    ..However, support for a similar pattern of visual processing in the ventral visual stream is less consistent. Critical to resolving the inconsistency is the assessment of local and global form processing ability...
  11. doi request reprint Do autistic symptoms persist across time? Evidence of substantial change in symptomatology over a 3-year period in cognitively able children with autism
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education, London, United Kingdom and University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
    Am J Intellect Dev Disabil 117:156-66. 2012
    ..The presence of a significant proportion of children showing considerable progress over the 3-year period challenges assumptions of diagnostic continuity and highlights the potential long-term benefits of early intervention...
  12. doi request reprint Atypical updating of face representations with experience in children with autism
    Louise Ewing
    ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia
    Dev Sci 16:116-23. 2013
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Processing slow and fast motion in children with autism spectrum conditions
    Catherine Manning
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education CRAE, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London
    Autism Res 6:531-41. 2013
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Central coherence in typically developing preschoolers: does it cohere and does it relate to mindreading and executive control?
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    School of Psychology, University of Western Australia
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 46:533-47. 2005
    ..Individuals with autism are at the extreme (weak) end of the continuum of coherence. There has been debate over whether CC is independent from other psychological functions such as theory of mind and executive control...
  15. ncbi request reprint Recognizing the un-real McCoy: priming and the modularity of face recognition
    Therese F Faulkner
    University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia
    Psychon Bull Rev 9:327-34. 2002
    ..Neither effect could be explained as a speed-accuracy tradeoff. These results fail to support Fodor's conjecture that face processing is encapsulated...
  16. doi request reprint The development of speed discrimination abilities
    Catherine Manning
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education CRAE, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, United Kingdom
    Vision Res 70:27-33. 2012
    ..The reasonably late development of speed processing abilities may be due to inherent limits in the integration of neuronal responses in motion-sensitive areas in early childhood...
  17. ncbi request reprint Are preschoolers sensitive to configural information in faces?
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    School of Psychology, University of Western Australia
    Dev Sci 9:270-7. 2006
    ..This effect was lost when faces were inverted. The results suggest that adult-like styles of face processing are present from 4 years of age...
  18. doi request reprint 'Sometimes I want to play by myself': Understanding what friendship means to children with autism in mainstream primary schools
    Lynsey Calder
    Institute of Education, University of London, UK
    Autism 17:296-316. 2013
    ..These findings highlight the need to ascertain the perspectives of young people with autism on their friendships and to consider the social and ethical implications of when and how to intervene...
  19. doi request reprint Reevaluating the selectivity of face-processing difficulties in children and adolescents with autism
    Louise Ewing
    ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
    J Exp Child Psychol 115:342-55. 2013
    ..Instead, our results are consistent with a more pervasive perceptual atypicality that may affect autistic processing of non-face stimuli as well as face stimuli...
  20. ncbi request reprint Holistic processing of faces in preschool children and adults
    Elizabeth Pellicano
    University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia
    Psychol Sci 14:618-22. 2003
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Reputation management: evidence for ability but reduced propensity in autism
    Eilidh Cage
    Centre for Research in Autism and Education CRAE, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck College, London, UK
    Autism Res 6:433-42. 2013
    ..Results indicate that, while individuals with autism may have the ability to think about reputation, a reduced expectation of reciprocal behavior from others may reduce the degree to which they engage in reputation management...
  22. doi request reprint Four-to-six-year-old children use norm-based coding in face-space
    Linda Jeffery
    School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia
    J Vis 10:18. 2010
    ....