T W J Garner

Summary

Affiliation: Institute of Zoology
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc The emerging amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis globally infects introduced populations of the North American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana
    Trenton W J Garner
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London NW1 4RY, UK
    Biol Lett 2:455-9. 2006
  2. doi request reprint Using itraconazole to clear Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection, and subsequent depigmentation of Alytes muletensis tadpoles
    T W J Garner
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London NW1 4RY, UK
    Dis Aquat Organ 83:257-60. 2009
  3. doi request reprint European phylogeography of the common frog (Rana temporaria): routes of postglacial colonization into the British Isles, and evidence for an Irish glacial refugium
    A G F Teacher
    Wildlife Epidemiology, Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Heredity (Edinb) 102:490-6. 2009
  4. pmc Evidence for directional selection at a novel major histocompatibility class I marker in wild common frogs (Rana temporaria) exposed to a viral pathogen (Ranavirus)
    Amber G F Teacher
    School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 4:e4616. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Population genetic patterns suggest a behavioural change in wild common frogs (Rana temporaria) following disease outbreaks (Ranavirus)
    Amber G F Teacher
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:3163-72. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Fatal chytridiomycosis in the tyrrhenian painted frog
    Jon Bielby
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Ecohealth 6:27-32. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Dermocystid infection and associated skin lesions in free-living palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus) from Southern France
    Milagros González-Hernández
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, United Kingdom
    Parasitol Int 59:344-50. 2010
  8. pmc Anthropogenic influence on prevalence of 2 amphibian pathogens
    Valerie St-Amour
    Emerg Infect Dis 14:1175-6. 2008
  9. pmc Persistence of the emerging pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis outside the amphibian host greatly increases the probability of host extinction
    Kate M Mitchell
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:329-34. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Environmental detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a temperate climate
    Susan F Walker
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, St Mary s Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Dis Aquat Organ 77:105-12. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. pmc The emerging amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis globally infects introduced populations of the North American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana
    Trenton W J Garner
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London NW1 4RY, UK
    Biol Lett 2:455-9. 2006
    ..These factors taken together with our study suggest that the global threat of B. dendrobatidis disease transmission posed by bullfrogs is significant...
  2. doi request reprint Using itraconazole to clear Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection, and subsequent depigmentation of Alytes muletensis tadpoles
    T W J Garner
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London NW1 4RY, UK
    Dis Aquat Organ 83:257-60. 2009
    ..However, we cannot recommend itraconazole as a treatment for this species as depigmentation of tadpoles was observed. Further research is required to determine the putative hepatotoxicity of this treatment...
  3. doi request reprint European phylogeography of the common frog (Rana temporaria): routes of postglacial colonization into the British Isles, and evidence for an Irish glacial refugium
    A G F Teacher
    Wildlife Epidemiology, Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Heredity (Edinb) 102:490-6. 2009
    ..This local genetic differentiation may be a consequence of a local glacial refuge, possibly combined with natural colonization or introduction from Western Europe...
  4. pmc Evidence for directional selection at a novel major histocompatibility class I marker in wild common frogs (Rana temporaria) exposed to a viral pathogen (Ranavirus)
    Amber G F Teacher
    School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 4:e4616. 2009
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Population genetic patterns suggest a behavioural change in wild common frogs (Rana temporaria) following disease outbreaks (Ranavirus)
    Amber G F Teacher
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:3163-72. 2009
    ..While the majority of studies consider demographic outcomes following disease outbreaks, our results indicate that emerging infectious diseases could also result in behavioural changes...
  6. doi request reprint Fatal chytridiomycosis in the tyrrhenian painted frog
    Jon Bielby
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Ecohealth 6:27-32. 2009
    ....
  7. doi request reprint Dermocystid infection and associated skin lesions in free-living palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus) from Southern France
    Milagros González-Hernández
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, United Kingdom
    Parasitol Int 59:344-50. 2010
    ..We discuss the potential significance of the presence of this pathogen in the context of the population health of palmate newts...
  8. pmc Anthropogenic influence on prevalence of 2 amphibian pathogens
    Valerie St-Amour
    Emerg Infect Dis 14:1175-6. 2008
  9. pmc Persistence of the emerging pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis outside the amphibian host greatly increases the probability of host extinction
    Kate M Mitchell
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:329-34. 2008
    ..Although this model is able to predict clear trends, more precise predictions will only be possible when the life history of B. dendrobatidis, including free-living stages of the life cycle, is better understood...
  10. ncbi request reprint Environmental detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a temperate climate
    Susan F Walker
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, St Mary s Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Dis Aquat Organ 77:105-12. 2007
    ..Our results emphasise the need to further investigate the life cycle of B. dendrobatidis to more completely understand the epidemiology of this emerging pathogen...
  11. pmc Chytrid fungus in Europe
    Trenton W J Garner
    Emerg Infect Dis 11:1639-41. 2005