Tim M Blackburn

Summary

Affiliation: Institute of Zoology
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Using aliens to explore how our planet works
    Tim M Blackburn
    Institute of Zoology, ZSL, Regents Park, London NW1 4RY, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:9-10. 2008
  2. doi request reprint A proposed unified framework for biological invasions
    Tim M Blackburn
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Trends Ecol Evol 26:333-9. 2011
  3. doi request reprint Threats to avifauna on oceanic islands revisited
    Tim M Blackburn
    Institute of Zoology, ZSL, Regent s Park, London NW1 4RY, United Kingdom
    Conserv Biol 22:492-4; discussion 495-7. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Establishment of exotic parasites: the origins and characteristics of an avian malaria community in an isolated island avifauna
    John G Ewen
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Ecol Lett 15:1112-9. 2012
  5. pmc Can unified theories of biodiversity explain mammalian macroecological patterns?
    Kate E Jones
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:2554-63. 2011
  6. doi request reprint The influence of numbers on invasion success
    Tim M Blackburn
    Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK Institute of Zoology, ZSL, Regent s Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK Distinguished Scientist Fellowship Program, King Saud University, PO Box 2455, Riyadh, 1145, Saudi Arabia School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005, Australia
    Mol Ecol 24:1942-53. 2015
  7. doi request reprint Sympatric speciation in birds is rare: insights from range data and simulations
    Albert B Phillimore
    Division of Biology and Natural Environment Research Council Centre for Population Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 171:646-57. 2008
  8. pmc Spatial turnover in the global avifauna
    Kevin J Gaston
    Biodiversity and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1567-74. 2007
  9. pmc Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness
    Richard G Davies
    Biodiversity and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1189-97. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Energy, range dynamics and global species richness patterns: reconciling mid-domain effects and environmental determinants of avian diversity
    David Storch
    Ecol Lett 9:1308-20. 2006

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. pmc Using aliens to explore how our planet works
    Tim M Blackburn
    Institute of Zoology, ZSL, Regents Park, London NW1 4RY, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:9-10. 2008
  2. doi request reprint A proposed unified framework for biological invasions
    Tim M Blackburn
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Trends Ecol Evol 26:333-9. 2011
    ..The unified framework combines previous stage-based and barrier models, and provides a terminology and categorisation for populations at different points in the invasion process...
  3. doi request reprint Threats to avifauna on oceanic islands revisited
    Tim M Blackburn
    Institute of Zoology, ZSL, Regent s Park, London NW1 4RY, United Kingdom
    Conserv Biol 22:492-4; discussion 495-7. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Establishment of exotic parasites: the origins and characteristics of an avian malaria community in an isolated island avifauna
    John G Ewen
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Ecol Lett 15:1112-9. 2012
    ..This has resulted in an increased number and greater taxonomic diversity of AM parasites now in New Zealand...
  5. pmc Can unified theories of biodiversity explain mammalian macroecological patterns?
    Kate E Jones
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:2554-63. 2011
    ..Specifically, we suggest that UTBs need to incorporate the dimensions of geographical space, species' traits and time to reconcile theory with pattern...
  6. doi request reprint The influence of numbers on invasion success
    Tim M Blackburn
    Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK Institute of Zoology, ZSL, Regent s Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK Distinguished Scientist Fellowship Program, King Saud University, PO Box 2455, Riyadh, 1145, Saudi Arabia School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005, Australia
    Mol Ecol 24:1942-53. 2015
    ..We finish by suggesting some further steps to advance our understanding of the influence of numbers on invasion success, particularly as they relate to the genetics of the process...
  7. doi request reprint Sympatric speciation in birds is rare: insights from range data and simulations
    Albert B Phillimore
    Division of Biology and Natural Environment Research Council Centre for Population Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 171:646-57. 2008
    ..Our simulations demonstrate that the observed patterns are most consistent with a model in which allopatric speciation is dominant but in which sympatric speciation is also present and contributes 5% of speciation events...
  8. pmc Spatial turnover in the global avifauna
    Kevin J Gaston
    Biodiversity and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1567-74. 2007
    ....
  9. pmc Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness
    Richard G Davies
    Biodiversity and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1189-97. 2007
    ..Rather a global perspective confirms the primary importance of mountain ranges in high-energy areas...
  10. ncbi request reprint Energy, range dynamics and global species richness patterns: reconciling mid-domain effects and environmental determinants of avian diversity
    David Storch
    Ecol Lett 9:1308-20. 2006
    ..This model also accurately predicts the latitudinal variation in species richness and variation of species richness both within and between realms, thus representing a compelling mechanism for the major trends in global biodiversity...
  11. ncbi request reprint Variations on a theme: sources of heterogeneity in the form of the interspecific relationship between abundance and distribution
    Tim M Blackburn
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    J Anim Ecol 75:1426-39. 2006
    ....
  12. pmc Human impacts and the global distribution of extinction risk
    Richard G Davies
    Biodiversity and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:2127-33. 2006
    ..These results underline the importance of a global perspective on the mechanisms driving spatial patterns of extinction risk, and the key role of anthropogenic factors in driving the current extinction crisis...
  13. pmc Global patterns of geographic range size in birds
    C David L Orme
    Division of Biology, Imperial College London, Ascot, Berkshire, United Kingdom
    PLoS Biol 4:e208. 2006
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint A phylogenetic analysis of the allometry of diving
    Lewis G Halsey
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 167:276-87. 2006
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Macroecology is distinct from biogeography
    Tim M Blackburn
    Nature 418:723. 2002
  16. ncbi request reprint Avian extinction and mammalian introductions on oceanic islands
    Tim M Blackburn
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Science 305:1955-8. 2004
    ....
  17. pmc Global patterns of introduction effort and establishment success in birds
    Phillip Cassey
    Laboratoire d Ecologie, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75230 Paris, France
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S405-8. 2004
    ..Apart from effort, only habitat generalism relates to establishment success in birds...
  18. ncbi request reprint Global hotspots of species richness are not congruent with endemism or threat
    C David L Orme
    Division of Biology and
    Nature 436:1016-9. 2005
    ..Consequently, the different types of hotspots also vary greatly in their utility as conservation tools...
  19. pmc Prehistoric bird extinctions and human hunting
    Richard P Duncan
    Ecology and Entomology Group, Division of Soil, Plant and Ecological Sciences, PO Box 84, Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand
    Proc Biol Sci 269:517-21. 2002
    ..This result cannot be attributed to preservation biases and provides clear evidence that selective hunting contributed significantly to prehistoric bird extinctions at this site...
  20. pmc Causes of exotic bird establishment across oceanic islands
    Phillip Cassey
    University of Birmingham School of Biosciences Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2059-63. 2005
    ..However, they also reveal a strong negative interaction across regions between establishment success and predation; exotic birds are more likely to fail on islands with species-rich mammalian predator assemblages...
  21. pmc Brain size and resource specialization predict long-term population trends in British birds
    Susanne Shultz
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Population and Evolutionary Biology Research Group, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 272:2305-11. 2005
    ..These results suggest that flexibility in resource use and behaviour are the most important characteristics for determining a species' ability to cope with large-scale habitat changes...
  22. pmc Habitat conversion and global avian biodiversity loss
    Kevin J Gaston
    Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 270:1293-300. 2003
    ..This loss is shared across a range of temperate and tropical land-use types...
  23. pmc A comparison of random draw and locally neutral models for the avifauna of an English woodland
    Andrew M Dolman
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    BMC Ecol 4:8. 2004
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Global distribution and conservation of rare and threatened vertebrates
    Richard Grenyer
    Department of Biology, Gilmer Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA
    Nature 444:93-6. 2006
    ..Instead, priority areas for biodiversity conservation must be based on high-resolution data from multiple taxa...
  25. pmc Big brains, enhanced cognition, and response of birds to novel environments
    Daniel Sol
    Centre de Recerca Ecològica i Aplicacions Forestals, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia, Spain
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:5460-5. 2005
    ..These findings provide strong evidence for the hypothesis that enlarged brains function, and hence may have evolved, to deal with changes in the environment...
  26. doi request reprint Eggshell colour does not predict measures of maternal investment in eggs of Turdus thrushes
    Phillip Cassey
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, Birmingham University, Birmingham, UK
    Naturwissenschaften 95:713-21. 2008
    ....
  27. pmc Evolutionary responses of discontinuous gas exchange in insects
    Craig R White
    Department of Environmental Biology, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:8357-61. 2007
    ..This result supports the hygric hypothesis. We conclude that the DGCs of insects reduce respiratory water loss while ensuring adequate gas exchange...
  28. pmc A survey of publication bias within evolutionary ecology
    Phillip Cassey
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S451-4. 2004
    ..We find that results published without effect sizes are a biased sample of those that are published. This further complicates the already difficult task of compiling quantitative literature reviews and meta-analytic studies...
  29. pmc Basal metabolic rate of birds is associated with habitat temperature and precipitation, not primary productivity
    Craig R White
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:287-93. 2007
    ..Instead, BMR was negatively associated with Ta and Tr, and positively associated with PCV...