L L Hench

Summary

Affiliation: Imperial College
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Bioactive sol-gel foams for tissue repair
    Pilar Sepulveda
    Centre for Tissue Engineering and Repair, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 59:340-8. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Third-generation biomedical materials
    Larry L Hench
    Department of Materials and the Tissue Engineering Centre, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, UK
    Science 295:1014-7. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Bioactive evaluation of 45S5 bioactive glass fibres and preliminary study of human osteoblast attachment
    Daniel C Clupper
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2BP, UK
    J Mater Sci Mater Med 15:803-8. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Biomaterials: a forecast for the future
    L L Hench
    Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, UK
    Biomaterials 19:1419-23. 1998
  5. ncbi request reprint Characterization of melt-derived 45S5 and sol-gel-derived 58S bioactive glasses
    P Sepulveda
    Department of Materials, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 58:734-40. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint Osteoblast responses to tape-cast and sintered bioactive glass ceramics
    J E Gough
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res A 69:621-8. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Bioactive glass-induced osteoblast differentiation: a noninvasive spectroscopic study
    G Jell
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res A 86:31-40. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Dose-dependent behavior of bioactive glass dissolution
    J R Jones
    Centre for Tissue Regeneration, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, SW7 2BP, London, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 58:720-6. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Low-temperature synthesis, structure, and bioactivity of gel-derived glasses in the binary CaO-SiO2 system
    P Saravanapavan
    Centre for Tissue Engineering, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 54:608-18. 2001
  10. ncbi request reprint Gene-expression profiling of human osteoblasts following treatment with the ionic products of Bioglass 45S5 dissolution
    I D Xynos
    Department of Histochemistry, Hammersmith Campus, Imperial College School of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 55:151-7. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications44

  1. ncbi request reprint Bioactive sol-gel foams for tissue repair
    Pilar Sepulveda
    Centre for Tissue Engineering and Repair, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 59:340-8. 2002
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Third-generation biomedical materials
    Larry L Hench
    Department of Materials and the Tissue Engineering Centre, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, UK
    Science 295:1014-7. 2002
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Bioactive evaluation of 45S5 bioactive glass fibres and preliminary study of human osteoblast attachment
    Daniel C Clupper
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2BP, UK
    J Mater Sci Mater Med 15:803-8. 2004
    ..These results are encouraging, as cell adhesion is an important first step prior to proliferation and differentiation...
  4. ncbi request reprint Biomaterials: a forecast for the future
    L L Hench
    Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, UK
    Biomaterials 19:1419-23. 1998
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Characterization of melt-derived 45S5 and sol-gel-derived 58S bioactive glasses
    P Sepulveda
    Department of Materials, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 58:734-40. 2001
    ..5-164.7 m(2)/g and a large fraction of 6-9 nm pore sizes. These differences in texture, as well as variations in chemical composition, account for significant changes in the resorption and in vivo responses...
  6. ncbi request reprint Osteoblast responses to tape-cast and sintered bioactive glass ceramics
    J E Gough
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res A 69:621-8. 2004
    ..These responses were dependent upon Si and Na release profiles of the tape-cast discs, and development of the hydroxyapatite layer...
  7. ncbi request reprint Bioactive glass-induced osteoblast differentiation: a noninvasive spectroscopic study
    G Jell
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res A 86:31-40. 2008
    ..This technique could have important applications in the field of regenerative medicine by enabling rapid characterization of cell or organoid behavior on novel bioactive scaffolds without damage to either cell or biomaterial...
  8. ncbi request reprint Dose-dependent behavior of bioactive glass dissolution
    J R Jones
    Centre for Tissue Regeneration, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, SW7 2BP, London, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 58:720-6. 2001
    ..This result must be taken into account when carrying out in vitro cell-culture studies to simulate conditions in vivo and in experiments using extracts of the bioactive glass powders...
  9. ncbi request reprint Low-temperature synthesis, structure, and bioactivity of gel-derived glasses in the binary CaO-SiO2 system
    P Saravanapavan
    Centre for Tissue Engineering, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 54:608-18. 2001
    ..These results indicate that the binary gel-derived CaO-SiO2 system exhibits a level of bioactivity over a similar molar range of SiO2 content as the previously studied ternary CaO-P2O5-SiO2 system...
  10. ncbi request reprint Gene-expression profiling of human osteoblasts following treatment with the ionic products of Bioglass 45S5 dissolution
    I D Xynos
    Department of Histochemistry, Hammersmith Campus, Imperial College School of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 55:151-7. 2001
    ..The identification of differentially expressed genes by cDNA microarray analysis has offered new insights into the mode of action of bioactive glasses and has proven to be an effective tool in evaluating their osteoproductive properties...
  11. ncbi request reprint In vitro dissolution of melt-derived 45S5 and sol-gel derived 58S bioactive glasses
    P Sepulveda
    Department of Materials, Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 61:301-11. 2002
    ..Thus, particle size range, glass type, and powder volume fraction can be used as a means to control the release rate of active ions that stimulate the gene expression and cellular response for tissue proliferation and repair...
  12. ncbi request reprint Osteoblast attachment and mineralized nodule formation on rough and smooth 45S5 bioactive glass monoliths
    J E Gough
    Department of Materials, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd, London, SW7 2BP, UK
    J Biomed Mater Res A 68:640-50. 2004
    ..This may have implications to bone tissue engineering using bioactive glasses...
  13. ncbi request reprint Bacteriostatic action of a novel four-component bioactive glass
    M Bellantone
    Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res 51:484-90. 2000
    ..01% of that of the control culture. In comparison, BG did not possess antimicrobial properties over the concentration range investigated (0.1-40.0 mg/mL)...
  14. ncbi request reprint Spectroscopic study of human lung epithelial cells (A549) in culture: living cells versus dead cells
    I Notingher
    Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Department of Materials, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    Biopolymers 72:230-40. 2003
    ..The differences in the 1190-1385 cm(-1) spectral region also suggest a decrease in the amount of nucleic acids and proteins. Using curve fitting, we quantify these spectral differences that can be used as markers of cell death...
  15. ncbi request reprint Preparation of bioactive glass-polyvinyl alcohol hybrid foams by the sol-gel method
    M M Pereira
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, UK
    J Mater Sci Mater Med 16:1045-50. 2005
    ..The surface area and mesopore volume decreased as polymer concentration increased in the hybrids. The strain at fracture of the hybrid foams was substantially greater than pure gel-glass foams...
  16. ncbi request reprint Mechanical properties of bioactive glasses, glass-ceramics and composites
    I D Thompson
    Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London
    Proc Inst Mech Eng H 212:127-36. 1998
    ..The development of a simple quality index has enabled some of the materials described within this paper to be ranked by their ability to replace bone, thus enabling possible new research directions to be emphasized...
  17. pmc Discrimination between ricin and sulphur mustard toxicity in vitro using Raman spectroscopy
    I Notingher
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    J R Soc Interface 1:79-90. 2004
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Bioglass (R) stimulation of embryonic long-bones in altered loading environments
    J Maroothynaden
    Centre for Tissue Regeneration and Repair, Imperial College, London, UK
    J Gravit Physiol 8:P79-80. 2001
    ..e. implant/tissue stress-shielding, space-flight...
  19. ncbi request reprint In situ monitoring of cell death using Raman microspectroscopy
    S Verrier
    Department of Materials, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    Biopolymers 74:157-62. 2004
    ..These changes are the effects of the complex molecular mechanisms during the induction of cell death, such as protein cleavage due to the activation of caspases, followed by DNA fragmentation...
  20. ncbi request reprint In vitro bioactivity of S520 glass fibers and initial assessment of osteoblast attachment
    D C Clupper
    Centre for Tissue Engineering, Materials Department, Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res A 67:285-94. 2003
    ..At 14 days, nodule formation was observed, and these nodules stained positive for alizarin red, demonstrating Ca deposition and, therefore mineralization...
  21. ncbi request reprint Development and in vitro characterisation of novel bioresorbable and bioactive composite materials based on polylactide foams and Bioglass for tissue engineering applications
    J A Roether
    Centre for Composite Materials, Imperial College, London, UK
    Biomaterials 23:3871-8. 2002
    ..The high bioactivity of the PDLLA foam/Bioglass composites indicates the potential of the materials for use as bioactive, resorbable scaffolds in bone tissue engineering...
  22. ncbi request reprint Dose- and time-dependent effect of bioactive gel-glass ionic-dissolution products on human fetal osteoblast-specific gene expression
    Ioannis Christodoulou
    Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine TERM Centre, Imperial College, Faculty of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Campus, London, UK
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 74:529-37. 2005
    ..The data overall suggest that no significant effect can be ascribed to the ionic products of 58S bioactive gel-glass dissolution tested here and their ability to stimulate osteoblastic marker gene expression...
  23. ncbi request reprint Optimising bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue engineering
    Julian R Jones
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Biomaterials 27:964-73. 2006
    ..Bioactive glass foam scaffolds sintered at 800 degrees C for 2 h fulfill the criteria for an ideal scaffold for tissue engineering applications...
  24. ncbi request reprint Enhanced derivation of osteogenic cells from murine embryonic stem cells after treatment with ionic dissolution products of 58S bioactive sol-gel glass
    Robert C Bielby
    Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Centre, Imperial College London, Faculty of Medicine, UK
    Tissue Eng 11:479-88. 2005
    ..83 +/- 7% for dexamethasone alone). This study demonstrates the capacity of an entirely inorganic material to stimulate differentiation of ES cells toward a lineage with therapeutic potential in tissue-engineering applications...
  25. ncbi request reprint Fabricating sol-gel glass monoliths with controlled nanoporosity
    Mohammad Ahmad
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Biomed Mater 2:6-10. 2007
    ..Conventional sol-gel processing yields pores an order of magnitude larger. Gelling time was also reduced from many hours to a few minutes, without using a gelling agent, and large crack-free monoliths were synthesized within 1 week...
  26. ncbi request reprint Controlling ion release from bioactive glass foam scaffolds with antibacterial properties
    Julian R Jones
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ
    J Mater Sci Mater Med 17:989-96. 2006
    ..Bioactive glass scaffolds, containing 2 mol% silver, released silver ions at a rate that was similar to that which has previously been found to be bactericidal but not high enough to be cytotoxic to bone cells...
  27. ncbi request reprint Extracellular matrix formation and mineralization on a phosphate-free porous bioactive glass scaffold using primary human osteoblast (HOB) cells
    Julian R Jones
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Biomaterials 28:1653-63. 2007
    ..The 70S30C bioactive glass scaffolds therefore fulfil many of the criteria for an ideal scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications...
  28. doi request reprint Hierarchical porous materials for tissue engineering
    Julian R Jones
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Philos Transact A Math Phys Eng Sci 364:263-81. 2006
    ..This paper describes how the structure and properties of the scaffolds are being optimized with respect to cell response and that tissue culture techniques must be optimized to enable growth of new bone in vitro...
  29. ncbi request reprint Binary CaO-SiO(2) gel-glasses for biomedical applications
    Priya Saravanapavan
    Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Centre, Department of Materials, Imperial College London, UK
    Biomed Mater Eng 14:467-86. 2004
    ..This report summarises the findings of the past and the present and also outlines potential of these calcium silicate gel-glasses in the field of biomaterials...
  30. ncbi request reprint Time- and concentration-dependent effects of dissolution products of 58S sol-gel bioactive glass on proliferation and differentiation of murine and human osteoblasts
    Robert C Bielby
    Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Centre, Imperial College London, Faculty of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London SW10 9NH, UK
    Tissue Eng 10:1018-26. 2004
    ..These data demonstrate the bioactive effects of dissolution products derived from sol-gel materials on primary osteoblasts and complements in vivo studies that indicate the suitability of this material as a bone graft substitute...
  31. ncbi request reprint Factors affecting the structure and properties of bioactive foam scaffolds for tissue engineering
    Julian R Jones
    Tissue Engineering Centre, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 68:36-44. 2004
    ..The in vitro dissolution and bioactivity of the bioactive foams were compared to that of unfoamed monoliths and powders (< 20 microm in diameter) of the same composition...
  32. ncbi request reprint Bioactivity of gel-glass powders in the CaO-SiO2 system: a comparison with ternary (CaO-P2O5-SiO2) and quaternary glasses (SiO2-CaO-P2O5-Na2O)
    Priya Saravanapavan
    Tissue Engineering Centre, Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res A 66:110-9. 2003
    ..It was shown that the simple two-component SiO2-CaO gel-glass powder is bioactive with comparable dissolution rates as the clinically used melt-derived 45S5 Bioglass powder and extensively studied sol-gel-derived 58S gel-glass powder...
  33. ncbi request reprint Nodule formation and mineralisation of human primary osteoblasts cultured on a porous bioactive glass scaffold
    Julie Elizabeth Gough
    Manchester Materials Science Centre, UMIST, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS, UK
    Biomaterials 25:2039-46. 2004
    ..Undiluted dissolution products from the foams however caused significant apoptosis suggesting an ion concentration dependent response...
  34. ncbi request reprint PDLLA/Bioglass composites for soft-tissue and hard-tissue engineering: an in vitro cell biology assessment
    Sophie Verrier
    Department of Materials and Centre for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, UK
    Biomaterials 25:3013-21. 2004
    ....
  35. ncbi request reprint Assessment of polyglycolic acid mesh and bioactive glass for soft-tissue engineering scaffolds
    Richard M Day
    Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, St Mark s Hospital and Academic Institute, Watford Road, Harrow HA1 3UJ, UK
    Biomaterials 25:5857-66. 2004
    ..The apparent ability of 45S5 Bioglass incorporated into scaffolds to increase neovascularization would be extremely beneficial during the engineering of larger soft-tissue constructs...
  36. pmc Broad-spectrum bactericidal activity of Ag(2)O-doped bioactive glass
    Maria Bellantone
    Department of Materials, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, United Kingdom
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 46:1940-5. 2002
    ..Our observations of the dissolution profiles of Ag(+) from AgBG in the presence and absence of bacteria are consistent with silver accumulation by the bacteria...
  37. ncbi request reprint Bioactive glasses for in situ tissue regeneration
    Larry L Hench
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, UK
    J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 15:543-62. 2004
    ..Gene activation by controlled ion release provides the conceptual basis for molecular design of a third generation of biomaterials optimised for in situ tissue regeneration...
  38. ncbi request reprint Structural studies of bioactivity in sol-gel-derived glasses by X-ray spectroscopy
    Laura J Skipper
    School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7NR, United Kingdom
    J Biomed Mater Res A 70:354-60. 2004
    ....
  39. ncbi request reprint Progress in Raman spectroscopy in the fields of tissue engineering, diagnostics and toxicological testing
    Chris A Owen
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Mater Sci Mater Med 17:1019-23. 2006
    ..Secondly, the aim is to optimise the technique as a research tool for the non-invasive real time investigation of cell/material interactions in the fields of tissue engineering and toxicology testing...
  40. ncbi request reprint The use of advanced diffraction methods in the study of the structure of a bioactive calcia: silica sol-gel glass
    Robert John Newport
    School of Physical Sciences, Ingram Building, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7NH, UK
    J Mater Sci Mater Med 17:1003-10. 2006
    ....
  41. ncbi request reprint The story of Bioglass
    Larry L Hench
    Department of Materials and Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Centre, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ
    J Mater Sci Mater Med 17:967-78. 2006
    ..The steps of discovery, characterization, in vivo and in vitro evaluation, clinical studies and product development are summarized along with the technology transfer processes...
  42. ncbi request reprint Preparation of poly(L-lactic acid)-polysiloxane-calcium carbonate hybrid membranes for guided bone regeneration
    Hirotaka Maeda
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso cho, Showa Ku, Nagoya 466 8555, Japan
    Biomaterials 27:1216-22. 2006
    ..The membrane coated with silicon-containing HCA had much higher cell-proliferation ability than the membrane...
  43. ncbi request reprint In situ non-invasive spectral discrimination between bone cell phenotypes used in tissue engineering
    Ioan Notingher
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BP, United Kingdom
    J Cell Biochem 92:1180-92. 2004
    ..This study proves the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to identify in situ phenotypic differences in living cells...
  44. ncbi request reprint Characterization of human fetal osteoblasts by microarray analysis following stimulation with 58S bioactive gel-glass ionic dissolution products
    Ioannis Christodoulou
    Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine TERM Centre, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Campus, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH, UK
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 77:431-46. 2006
    ..These data suggest that 58S ionic dissolution products possibly mediate the bioactive effect of 58S through components of the IGF system and MAPK signaling pathways...