Nicholas P Franks

Summary

Affiliation: Imperial College
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi The TREK K2P channels and their role in general anaesthesia and neuroprotection
    Nicholas P Franks
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Trends Pharmacol Sci 25:601-8. 2004
  2. pmc Molecular targets underlying general anaesthesia
    Nicholas P Franks
    Biophysics Section, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ
    Br J Pharmacol 147:S72-81. 2006
  3. doi Sleep and general anesthesia
    Nicholas P Franks
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Imperial College, South Kensington, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Can J Anaesth 58:139-48. 2011
  4. doi General anaesthesia: from molecular targets to neuronal pathways of sleep and arousal
    Nicholas P Franks
    Blackett Laboratory Biophysics Section, Imperial College, South Kensington, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Nat Rev Neurosci 9:370-86. 2008
  5. doi Competitive inhibition at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediates xenon neuroprotection against hypoxia-ischemia
    Paul Banks
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Department of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 112:614-22. 2010
  6. ncbi Xenon and hypothermia combine to provide neuroprotection from neonatal asphyxia
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anaesthetics and Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Ann Neurol 58:182-93. 2005
  7. pmc GABAergic inhibition of histaminergic neurons regulates active waking but not the sleep-wake switch or propofol-induced loss of consciousness
    Anna Y Zecharia
    Biophysics Section, Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 32:13062-75. 2012
  8. ncbi Xenon preconditioning reduces brain damage from neonatal asphyxia in rats
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anaesthetics, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 26:199-208. 2006
  9. ncbi Xenon mitigates isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis in the developing rodent brain
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 106:746-53. 2007
  10. ncbi Competitive inhibition at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor by the anesthetics xenon and isoflurane: evidence from molecular modeling and electrophysiology
    Robert Dickinson
    Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 107:756-67. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications38

  1. ncbi The TREK K2P channels and their role in general anaesthesia and neuroprotection
    Nicholas P Franks
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Trends Pharmacol Sci 25:601-8. 2004
    ....
  2. pmc Molecular targets underlying general anaesthesia
    Nicholas P Franks
    Biophysics Section, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ
    Br J Pharmacol 147:S72-81. 2006
    ....
  3. doi Sleep and general anesthesia
    Nicholas P Franks
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Imperial College, South Kensington, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Can J Anaesth 58:139-48. 2011
    ..In this review, we examine the evidence that anesthetic-induced loss of consciousness may be caused by actions on the neuronal pathways that produce natural sleep...
  4. doi General anaesthesia: from molecular targets to neuronal pathways of sleep and arousal
    Nicholas P Franks
    Blackett Laboratory Biophysics Section, Imperial College, South Kensington, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Nat Rev Neurosci 9:370-86. 2008
    ..Recent work suggests that the thalamus and the neuronal networks that regulate its activity are the key to understanding how anaesthetics cause loss of consciousness...
  5. doi Competitive inhibition at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediates xenon neuroprotection against hypoxia-ischemia
    Paul Banks
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Department of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 112:614-22. 2010
    ..Xenon inhibits NMDA receptors by competing with glycine at the glycine-binding site. We test the hypothesis that inhibition of the NMDA receptor at the glycine site underlies xenon neuroprotection against hypoxia-ischemia...
  6. ncbi Xenon and hypothermia combine to provide neuroprotection from neonatal asphyxia
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anaesthetics and Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Ann Neurol 58:182-93. 2005
    ..If applied to humans, these data suggest that low (subanesthetic) concentrations of xenon in combination with mild hypothermia may provide a safe and effective therapy for perinatal asphyxia...
  7. pmc GABAergic inhibition of histaminergic neurons regulates active waking but not the sleep-wake switch or propofol-induced loss of consciousness
    Anna Y Zecharia
    Biophysics Section, Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 32:13062-75. 2012
    ..GABA(B) receptors on histaminergic neurons were dispensable for all behaviors examined. Synaptic inhibition of histaminergic cells by GABA(A) receptors, however, was essential for habituation to a novel environment...
  8. ncbi Xenon preconditioning reduces brain damage from neonatal asphyxia in rats
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anaesthetics, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK
    J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 26:199-208. 2006
    ..These studies provide evidence for xenon's preconditioning effect, which might be caused by a pCREB-regulated synthesis of proteins that promote survival against neuronal injury...
  9. ncbi Xenon mitigates isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis in the developing rodent brain
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 106:746-53. 2007
    ..Therefore, the current study sought to investigate xenon's putative protective properties against anesthetic-induced neuronal apoptosis...
  10. ncbi Competitive inhibition at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor by the anesthetics xenon and isoflurane: evidence from molecular modeling and electrophysiology
    Robert Dickinson
    Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 107:756-67. 2007
    ..However, the site of action of these agents on the NMDA receptor is unknown. The authors show that xenon and isoflurane compete for the binding of the coagonist glycine on the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit...
  11. doi The involvement of hypothalamic sleep pathways in general anesthesia: testing the hypothesis using the GABAA receptor beta3N265M knock-in mouse
    Anna Y Zecharia
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 29:2177-87. 2009
    ..Overall, our results support the idea that GABAergic anesthetics such as propofol exert their effects, at least in part, by modulating hypothalamic sleep pathways...
  12. doi Neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury by xenon, but not argon, is mediated by inhibition at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine site
    Katie Harris
    Ph D Student, Masters student, Professor of Biophysics and Anaesthetics, Lecturer in Anaesthetics, Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine, and Intensive Care Section, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Biophysics Section, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 119:1137-48. 2013
    ..The authors investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of the inert gases such as xenon, argon, krypton, neon, and helium in an in vitro model of traumatic brain injury...
  13. doi Identification of two mutations (F758W and F758Y) in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine-binding site that selectively prevent competitive inhibition by xenon without affecting glycine binding
    Scott P Armstrong
    Biophysics Section, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 117:38-47. 2012
    ..Here we identify specific amino acids important for xenon binding to the NMDA receptor, with the aim of finding silent mutations that eliminate xenon binding but leave normal receptor function intact...
  14. pmc An unexpected role for TASK-3 potassium channels in network oscillations with implications for sleep mechanisms and anesthetic action
    Daniel S J Pang
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:17546-51. 2009
    ..These results imply a previously unexpected role for TASK-3 channels in the cellular mechanisms underlying these behaviors and suggest that endogenous modulators of these channels may regulate theta oscillations...
  15. pmc Bench-to-bedside review: Molecular pharmacology and clinical use of inert gases in anesthesia and neuroprotection
    Robert Dickinson
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Crit Care 14:229. 2010
    ..We summarize recent in vitro and in vivo studies on the actions of helium and the other inert gases, and discuss their potential to be used as neuroprotective agents...
  16. pmc The effects of hypoxia on the modulation of human TREK-1 potassium channels
    Alex J Caley
    Biophysics Section, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    J Physiol 562:205-12. 2005
    ..We further show that the protocol used by previous workers to prepare hypoxic solutions of arachidonic acid results in the removal of the compound from solution...
  17. ncbi Identification of anesthetic binding sites on human serum albumin using a novel etomidate photolabel
    Damian P Bright
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Biol Chem 282:12038-47. 2007
    ..The acyl azide etomidate may prove to be a useful new photolabel to identify anesthetic binding sites on the GABA(A) receptor or other putative targets...
  18. ncbi The two-pore-domain K(+) channels TREK-1 and TASK-3 are differentially modulated by copper and zinc
    Marco Gruss
    Biophysics Section, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Mol Pharmacol 66:530-7. 2004
    ..These observations provide a novel explanation for how copper and zinc might affect neuronal excitability under both normal physiological conditions, as well as during diseases in which copper or zinc homeostasis has been disrupted...
  19. ncbi Dexmedetomidine produces its neuroprotective effect via the alpha 2A-adrenoceptor subtype
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anaesthetics, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH, UK
    Eur J Pharmacol 502:87-97. 2004
    ..Our data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of dexmedetomidine is mediated by activation of the alpha2A adrenergic receptor subtype...
  20. pmc A propofol binding site on mammalian GABAA receptors identified by photolabeling
    Grace M S Yip
    1 Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College, London, UK 2
    Nat Chem Biol 9:715-20. 2013
    ..The binding site is located within the β subunit at the interface between the transmembrane domains and the extracellular domain and lies close to known determinants of anesthetic sensitivity in the transmembrane segments TM1 and TM2. ..
  21. doi The neuroprotective effects of xenon and helium in an in vitro model of traumatic brain injury
    Mark Coburn
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Crit Care Med 36:588-95. 2008
    ..The "inert" gas xenon has been shown to be an effective neuroprotectant in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models of neuronal injury. We examined its neuroprotective properties in an in vitro model of traumatic brain injury...
  22. ncbi Two-pore-domain K+ channels are a novel target for the anesthetic gases xenon, nitrous oxide, and cyclopropane
    Marco Gruss
    Biophysics Section, Department of Biological Sciences, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Mol Pharmacol 65:443-52. 2004
    ..Finally, we show that Glu306, an amino acid that has previously been found to be important in the modulation of TREK-1 by arachidonic acid, membrane stretch and internal pH, is critical for the activating effects of the anesthetic gases...
  23. ncbi Determinants of the anesthetic sensitivity of two-pore domain acid-sensitive potassium channels: molecular cloning of an anesthetic-activated potassium channel from Lymnaea stagnalis
    Isabelle Andres-Enguix
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, and Division of Biology, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ
    J Biol Chem 282:20977-90. 2007
    ..The L159A mutation in LyTASK disrupts the stereoselective response to isoflurane while having no effect on the pH sensitivity of the channel, suggesting this critical amino acid may form part of an anesthetic binding site...
  24. ncbi Expansion of gas bubbles by nitrous oxide and xenon
    Rodrigo Benavides
    Biophysics Section, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Anesthesiology 104:299-302. 2006
    ....
  25. ncbi Xenon exerts age-independent antinociception in Fischer rats
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anesthetics and Intensive Care, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 100:1313-8. 2004
  26. doi Are extrasynaptic GABAA receptors important targets for sedative/hypnotic drugs?
    Catriona M Houston
    Biophysics Section, Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 32:3887-97. 2012
    ..These issues will be important when considering drug strategies designed to target extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors in the treatment of sleep disorders and other neurological conditions...
  27. ncbi Seeing the light: protein theories of general anesthesia. 1984
    Nicholas P Franks
    Biophysics Section, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 101:235-7. 2004
    ..The obvious mechanism suggested by our results is that general anaesthetics, despite their chemical and structural diversity, act by competing with endogenous ligands for binding to specific receptors...
  28. ncbi Feasibility and safety of delivering xenon to patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery while on cardiopulmonary bypass: phase I study
    Geoffrey G Lockwood
    Hammersmith Hospitals Trust, London, UK
    Anesthesiology 104:458-65. 2006
    ....
  29. ncbi Determinants of the sensitivity of AMPA receptors to xenon
    Andrew J R Plested
    Biophysics Section, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 100:347-58. 2004
    ..In contrast, glutamate receptors, the most important class of fast excitatory neurotransmitter-gated receptor channels, have received much less attention, and their role in the production of the anesthetic state remains controversial...
  30. ncbi Combination of xenon and isoflurane produces a synergistic protective effect against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury in a neuronal-glial co-culture model
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anaesthetics and Intensive Care, Imperial College, London, UK
    Anesthesiology 99:748-51. 2003
  31. ncbi Neuroprotective interaction produced by xenon and dexmedetomidine on in vitro and in vivo neuronal injury models
    Nishanthan Rajakumaraswamy
    Departments of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH, United Kingdom
    Neurosci Lett 409:128-33. 2006
    ..The long-term neurological function data corroborated these morphological data. Our study demonstrates that the combination of xenon and Dex offers neuroprotection additively in vitro and synergistically in vivo...
  32. ncbi The neuroprotective effect of xenon administration during transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice
    H Mayumi Homi
    Department of Anesthesiology Multidisciplinary Neuroprotection Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Anesthesiology 99:876-81. 2003
    ..However, its putative neuroprotective properties have not been evaluated in focal cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this study was to determine if xenon offers neuroprotection in a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion...
  33. ncbi Xenon attenuates cardiopulmonary bypass-induced neurologic and neurocognitive dysfunction in the rat
    Daqing Ma
    Department of Anesthetics, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 98:690-8. 2003
    ....
  34. ncbi The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine converges on an endogenous sleep-promoting pathway to exert its sedative effects
    Laura E Nelson
    Department of Anaesthetics, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 98:428-36. 2003
    ..The authors investigated whether the sedative, or hypnotic, action of the general anesthetic dexmedetomidine (a selective alpha -adrenoceptor agonist) activates endogenous nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep-promoting pathways...
  35. ncbi Effects of xenon on in vitro and in vivo models of neuronal injury
    Stefan Wilhelm
    Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 96:1485-91. 2002
    ..Because of the pivotal role that NMDA receptors play in neuronal injury, the authors investigated the efficacy of xenon as a neuroprotectant in both in vitro and in vivo paradigms...
  36. ncbi The common chemical motifs within anesthetic binding sites
    Edward J Bertaccini
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Anesth Analg 104:318-24. 2007
    ..These structures show anesthetic-protein interactions at the atomic level...
  37. ncbi The differential effects of nitrous oxide and xenon on extracellular dopamine levels in the rat nucleus accumbens: a microdialysis study
    Sachiyo Sakamoto
    Department of Anesthesiology, Kansai Medical University, 10 15 Fumizono cho, Moriguchi Shi, Osaka 570 8507, Japan
    Anesth Analg 103:1459-63. 2006
    ..These data suggest that the difference in neuropsychological activity between nitrous oxide and xenon is partly due to their differential effects on the mesolimbic dopamine system...
  38. ncbi Rested and refreshed after anesthesia? Overlapping neurobiologic mechanisms of sleep and anesthesia
    Laura E Nelson
    Anesthesiology 100:1341-2. 2004