Matthew C Fisher

Summary

Affiliation: Imperial College
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Proteomic and phenotypic profiling of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis shows that genotype is linked to virulence
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, St Mary s Hospital, Norfolk Place, London W21PG, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:415-29. 2009
  2. pmc Expression profiling the temperature-dependent amphibian response to infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Laia Ribas
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, UK
    PLoS ONE 4:e8408. 2009
  3. pmc Emerging fungal threats to animal, plant and ecosystem health
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, UK
    Nature 484:186-94. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Sex, drugs and recombination: the wild life of Aspergillus
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK
    Mol Ecol 21:1305-6. 2012
  5. pmc Multilocus microsatellite typing system for Penicillium marneffei reveals spatially structured populations
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, London W2 1PG, UK
    J Clin Microbiol 42:5065-9. 2004
  6. doi request reprint Endemic and introduced haplotypes of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Japanese amphibians: sink or source?
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London W21PG, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:4731-3. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Context-dependent amphibian host population response to an invading pathogen
    Benjamin J Doddington
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Ecology 94:1795-804. 2013
  8. pmc Chromosomal copy number variation, selection and uneven rates of recombination reveal cryptic genome diversity linked to pathogenicity
    Rhys A Farrer
    The Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Genet 9:e1003703. 2013
  9. pmc Multiple emergences of genetically diverse amphibian-infecting chytrids include a globalized hypervirulent recombinant lineage
    Rhys A Farrer
    Department Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:18732-6. 2011
  10. doi request reprint Factors driving pathogenicity vs. prevalence of amphibian panzootic chytridiomycosis in Iberia
    Susan F Walker
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London W2 1PG, UK
    Ecol Lett 13:372-82. 2010

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. doi request reprint Proteomic and phenotypic profiling of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis shows that genotype is linked to virulence
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, St Mary s Hospital, Norfolk Place, London W21PG, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:415-29. 2009
    ..We argue that future studies need to clarify the mechanism(s) and rate at which Bd is evolving, and the impact that such variation has on the host-pathogen dynamic...
  2. pmc Expression profiling the temperature-dependent amphibian response to infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Laia Ribas
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, UK
    PLoS ONE 4:e8408. 2009
    ..This study demonstrates the temperature-dependency of the amphibian response to infection by Bd and indicates the influence that changing climates may exert on the ectothermic host response to pathogens...
  3. pmc Emerging fungal threats to animal, plant and ecosystem health
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, UK
    Nature 484:186-94. 2012
    ..We argue that nascent fungal infections will cause increasing attrition of biodiversity, with wider implications for human and ecosystem health, unless steps are taken to tighten biosecurity worldwide...
  4. doi request reprint Sex, drugs and recombination: the wild life of Aspergillus
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK
    Mol Ecol 21:1305-6. 2012
    ....
  5. pmc Multilocus microsatellite typing system for Penicillium marneffei reveals spatially structured populations
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, London W2 1PG, UK
    J Clin Microbiol 42:5065-9. 2004
    ..multilocus.net/); this provides a powerful epidemiological tool for analyzing the underlying parameters that are responsible for the emergence of P. marneffei in human immunodeficiency virus-positive populations...
  6. doi request reprint Endemic and introduced haplotypes of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Japanese amphibians: sink or source?
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London W21PG, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:4731-3. 2009
    ..Their results show that Bd is widely prevalent in native species across Japan in at least three of the islands that make up the archipelago, proving for the first time that Asia harbours Bd...
  7. ncbi request reprint Context-dependent amphibian host population response to an invading pathogen
    Benjamin J Doddington
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Ecology 94:1795-804. 2013
    ..Our results illustrate the need to take into account the appropriate environmental scale and context when assessing the risk that an emerging pathogen presents to a naive population or species...
  8. pmc Chromosomal copy number variation, selection and uneven rates of recombination reveal cryptic genome diversity linked to pathogenicity
    Rhys A Farrer
    The Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Genet 9:e1003703. 2013
    ....
  9. pmc Multiple emergences of genetically diverse amphibian-infecting chytrids include a globalized hypervirulent recombinant lineage
    Rhys A Farrer
    Department Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:18732-6. 2011
    ....
  10. doi request reprint Factors driving pathogenicity vs. prevalence of amphibian panzootic chytridiomycosis in Iberia
    Susan F Walker
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London W2 1PG, UK
    Ecol Lett 13:372-82. 2010
    ..This study demonstrates the power of combining surveillance and molecular data to ascertain the drivers of new emerging infections diseases...
  11. doi request reprint Global emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and amphibian chytridiomycosis in space, time, and host
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, St Mary s Hospital, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United
    Annu Rev Microbiol 63:291-310. 2009
    ..We then consider the major host and pathogen factors that have led to the occurrence of chytridiomycosis in amphibian species, populations, and communities...
  12. ncbi request reprint Environmental detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a temperate climate
    Susan F Walker
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, St Mary s Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Dis Aquat Organ 77:105-12. 2007
    ..Our results emphasise the need to further investigate the life cycle of B. dendrobatidis to more completely understand the epidemiology of this emerging pathogen...
  13. pmc Persistence of the emerging pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis outside the amphibian host greatly increases the probability of host extinction
    Kate M Mitchell
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:329-34. 2008
    ..Although this model is able to predict clear trends, more precise predictions will only be possible when the life history of B. dendrobatidis, including free-living stages of the life cycle, is better understood...
  14. ncbi request reprint Epidemiological and genetic analysis of severe acute respiratory syndrome
    Christl A Donnelly
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London, UK
    Lancet Infect Dis 4:672-83. 2004
    ....
  15. pmc Clonality despite sex: the evolution of host-associated sexual neighborhoods in the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei
    Daniel A Henk
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002851. 2012
    ..marneffei overlap with three different bamboo rat host distributions suggesting that recombination within hosts may act to maintain population barriers within P. marneffei...
  16. pmc Low diversity Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii multilocus sequence types from Thailand are consistent with an ancestral African origin
    Sitali P Simwami
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 7:e1001343. 2011
    ..96 - 27,177.76). Further high-density sampling of global Cng STs is now necessary to resolve the temporal sequence underlying the global emergence of this human pathogen...
  17. pmc Using false discovery rates to benchmark SNP-callers in next-generation sequencing projects
    Rhys A Farrer
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, St Mary s Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK
    Sci Rep 3:1512. 2013
    ..We benchmark this method against other SNP callers using our FDR method with three fungal genomes, finding that it was able achieve a high level of accuracy. These tools are available at http://cfdr.sourceforge.net/...
  18. pmc The gut fungus Basidiobolus ranarum has a large genome and different copy numbers of putatively functionally redundant elongation factor genes
    Daniel A Henk
    The Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e31268. 2012
    ..This suggests that gene or genome duplication may be an important feature of B. ranarum evolution, and also suggests that B. ranarum may have mechanisms in place that favor the preservation of functionally overlapping genes...
  19. pmc Genetic diversity, recombination, and divergence in animal associated Penicillium dipodomyis
    Daniel A Henk
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e22883. 2011
    ..dipodomyis lineage diverged from closely related species also found in cheek pouches of Kangaroo Rats and their stored seeds about 11 million years ago, a similar divergence time as Dipodomys from its sister rodent taxa...
  20. doi request reprint Invasive pathogens threaten species recovery programs
    Susan F Walker
    Curr Biol 18:R853-4. 2008
  21. pmc The emerging amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis globally infects introduced populations of the North American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana
    Trenton W J Garner
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London NW1 4RY, UK
    Biol Lett 2:455-9. 2006
    ..These factors taken together with our study suggest that the global threat of B. dendrobatidis disease transmission posed by bullfrogs is significant...
  22. pmc Chytrid fungus in Europe
    Trenton W J Garner
    Emerg Infect Dis 11:1639-41. 2005
  23. pmc Role of Cannomys badius as a natural animal host of Penicillium marneffei in India
    Harish Gugnani
    Department of Medical Mycology, University of Delhi, India
    J Clin Microbiol 42:5070-5. 2004
    ..This demonstrates the utility of an MLMT-based approach to elucidating the epidemiology of P. marneffei...
  24. pmc Penicillium marneffei infection and recent advances in the epidemiology and molecular biology aspects
    Nongnuch Vanittanakom
    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
    Clin Microbiol Rev 19:95-110. 2006
    ..Future investigations pertaining to the roles of these genes in host-fungus interactions may provide the key knowledge to understanding the pathogenicity of P. marneffei...
  25. pmc Climate change and outbreaks of amphibian chytridiomycosis in a montane area of Central Spain; is there a link?
    Jaime Bosch
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2 28006 Madrid, Spain
    Proc Biol Sci 274:253-60. 2007
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint Isolation and identification of the human pathogen Pythium insidiosum from environmental samples collected in Thai agricultural areas
    Jidapa Supabandhu
    Department of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
    Med Mycol 46:41-52. 2008
    ..insidiosum infection for individuals working in endemic agricultural areas...
  27. ncbi request reprint Fungal multilocus sequence typing--it's not just for bacteria
    John W Taylor
    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 3102, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 6:351-6. 2003
    ..mode can help answer questions common to all emerging diseases: is the disease due to the recent spread of a pathogen, to the emergence of a virulent strain of an existing pathogen, or to a change in the environment that promotes disease?..