Matthew C Fisher

Summary

Affiliation: Imperial College
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Global emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and amphibian chytridiomycosis in space, time, and host
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, St Mary s Hospital, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United
    Annu Rev Microbiol 63:291-310. 2009
  2. ncbi request reprint Context-dependent amphibian host population response to an invading pathogen
    Benjamin J Doddington
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Ecology 94:1795-804. 2013
  3. pmc Multiple emergences of genetically diverse amphibian-infecting chytrids include a globalized hypervirulent recombinant lineage
    Rhys A Farrer
    Department Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:18732-6. 2011
  4. doi request reprint Proteomic and phenotypic profiling of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis shows that genotype is linked to virulence
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, St Mary s Hospital, Norfolk Place, London W21PG, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:415-29. 2009
  5. pmc Persistence of the emerging pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis outside the amphibian host greatly increases the probability of host extinction
    Kate M Mitchell
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:329-34. 2008
  6. pmc Clonality despite sex: the evolution of host-associated sexual neighborhoods in the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei
    Daniel A Henk
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002851. 2012
  7. pmc Using false discovery rates to benchmark SNP-callers in next-generation sequencing projects
    Rhys A Farrer
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, St Mary s Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK
    Sci Rep 3:1512. 2013
  8. pmc Emerging fungal threats to animal, plant and ecosystem health
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, UK
    Nature 484:186-94. 2012
  9. ncbi request reprint Environmental detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a temperate climate
    Susan F Walker
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, St Mary s Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Dis Aquat Organ 77:105-12. 2007

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. doi request reprint Global emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and amphibian chytridiomycosis in space, time, and host
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, St Mary s Hospital, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United
    Annu Rev Microbiol 63:291-310. 2009
    ..We then consider the major host and pathogen factors that have led to the occurrence of chytridiomycosis in amphibian species, populations, and communities...
  2. ncbi request reprint Context-dependent amphibian host population response to an invading pathogen
    Benjamin J Doddington
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Ecology 94:1795-804. 2013
    ..Our results illustrate the need to take into account the appropriate environmental scale and context when assessing the risk that an emerging pathogen presents to a naive population or species...
  3. pmc Multiple emergences of genetically diverse amphibian-infecting chytrids include a globalized hypervirulent recombinant lineage
    Rhys A Farrer
    Department Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:18732-6. 2011
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Proteomic and phenotypic profiling of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis shows that genotype is linked to virulence
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, St Mary s Hospital, Norfolk Place, London W21PG, UK
    Mol Ecol 18:415-29. 2009
    ..We argue that future studies need to clarify the mechanism(s) and rate at which Bd is evolving, and the impact that such variation has on the host-pathogen dynamic...
  5. pmc Persistence of the emerging pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis outside the amphibian host greatly increases the probability of host extinction
    Kate M Mitchell
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 275:329-34. 2008
    ..Although this model is able to predict clear trends, more precise predictions will only be possible when the life history of B. dendrobatidis, including free-living stages of the life cycle, is better understood...
  6. pmc Clonality despite sex: the evolution of host-associated sexual neighborhoods in the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei
    Daniel A Henk
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002851. 2012
    ..marneffei overlap with three different bamboo rat host distributions suggesting that recombination within hosts may act to maintain population barriers within P. marneffei...
  7. pmc Using false discovery rates to benchmark SNP-callers in next-generation sequencing projects
    Rhys A Farrer
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, St Mary s Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK
    Sci Rep 3:1512. 2013
    ..We benchmark this method against other SNP callers using our FDR method with three fungal genomes, finding that it was able achieve a high level of accuracy. These tools are available at http://cfdr.sourceforge.net/...
  8. pmc Emerging fungal threats to animal, plant and ecosystem health
    Matthew C Fisher
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London W2 1PG, UK
    Nature 484:186-94. 2012
    ..We argue that nascent fungal infections will cause increasing attrition of biodiversity, with wider implications for human and ecosystem health, unless steps are taken to tighten biosecurity worldwide...
  9. ncbi request reprint Environmental detection of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a temperate climate
    Susan F Walker
    Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, St Mary s Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
    Dis Aquat Organ 77:105-12. 2007
    ..Our results emphasise the need to further investigate the life cycle of B. dendrobatidis to more completely understand the epidemiology of this emerging pathogen...