Robert Dickinson

Summary

Affiliation: Imperial College
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Competitive inhibition at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor by the anesthetics xenon and isoflurane: evidence from molecular modeling and electrophysiology
    Robert Dickinson
    Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 107:756-67. 2007
  2. pmc Bench-to-bedside review: Molecular pharmacology and clinical use of inert gases in anesthesia and neuroprotection
    Robert Dickinson
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Crit Care 14:229. 2010
  3. ncbi request reprint Competitive inhibition at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediates xenon neuroprotection against hypoxia-ischemia
    Paul Banks
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Department of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 112:614-22. 2010
  4. ncbi request reprint Neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury by xenon, but not argon, is mediated by inhibition at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine site
    Katie Harris
    Ph D Student, Masters student, Professor of Biophysics and Anaesthetics, Lecturer in Anaesthetics, Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine, and Intensive Care Section, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Biophysics Section, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 119:1137-48. 2013
  5. ncbi request reprint Identification of two mutations (F758W and F758Y) in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine-binding site that selectively prevent competitive inhibition by xenon without affecting glycine binding
    Scott P Armstrong
    Biophysics Section, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 117:38-47. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint Xenon improves neurologic outcome and reduces secondary injury following trauma in an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury*
    Rita Campos-Pires
    1Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care Section, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom 2Department of Anaesthesiology, Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany 3Department of Anaesthesiology, Klinikum Hanau, Hanau, Germany 4Mouse Behavioral Outcome Unit, Focus Program Translational Neurosciences, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany 5Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Crit Care Med 43:149-58. 2015
  7. ncbi request reprint Determinants of the anesthetic sensitivity of two-pore domain acid-sensitive potassium channels: molecular cloning of an anesthetic-activated potassium channel from Lymnaea stagnalis
    Isabelle Andres-Enguix
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, and Division of Biology, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ
    J Biol Chem 282:20977-90. 2007

Collaborators

  • Nicholas P Franks
  • Kristin Engelhard
  • Marco Gruss
  • Serge C Thal
  • Scott P Armstrong
  • Rita Campos-Pires
  • Katie Harris
  • Paul Banks
  • Isabelle Andres-Enguix
  • Christian Werner
  • Clara Luh
  • Konstantin Radyushkin
  • Anne Sebastiani
  • Tobias Hirnet
  • Louise Kiru
  • Thomas J W McKitrick
  • Paul J Banks
  • Christopher J Edge
  • Rohan Babla
  • Catharine H Geldart
  • Constantinos Simillis
  • Alex Caley
  • Pietro D Spanu
  • Raquel Yustos
  • Mark A Schumacher
  • Mervyn Maze

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint Competitive inhibition at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor by the anesthetics xenon and isoflurane: evidence from molecular modeling and electrophysiology
    Robert Dickinson
    Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 107:756-67. 2007
    ..However, the site of action of these agents on the NMDA receptor is unknown. The authors show that xenon and isoflurane compete for the binding of the coagonist glycine on the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit...
  2. pmc Bench-to-bedside review: Molecular pharmacology and clinical use of inert gases in anesthesia and neuroprotection
    Robert Dickinson
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Crit Care 14:229. 2010
    ..We summarize recent in vitro and in vivo studies on the actions of helium and the other inert gases, and discuss their potential to be used as neuroprotective agents...
  3. ncbi request reprint Competitive inhibition at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediates xenon neuroprotection against hypoxia-ischemia
    Paul Banks
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Department of Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 112:614-22. 2010
    ..Xenon inhibits NMDA receptors by competing with glycine at the glycine-binding site. We test the hypothesis that inhibition of the NMDA receptor at the glycine site underlies xenon neuroprotection against hypoxia-ischemia...
  4. ncbi request reprint Neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury by xenon, but not argon, is mediated by inhibition at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine site
    Katie Harris
    Ph D Student, Masters student, Professor of Biophysics and Anaesthetics, Lecturer in Anaesthetics, Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine, and Intensive Care Section, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Biophysics Section, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 119:1137-48. 2013
    ..The authors investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of the inert gases such as xenon, argon, krypton, neon, and helium in an in vitro model of traumatic brain injury...
  5. ncbi request reprint Identification of two mutations (F758W and F758Y) in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine-binding site that selectively prevent competitive inhibition by xenon without affecting glycine binding
    Scott P Armstrong
    Biophysics Section, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Anesthesiology 117:38-47. 2012
    ..Here we identify specific amino acids important for xenon binding to the NMDA receptor, with the aim of finding silent mutations that eliminate xenon binding but leave normal receptor function intact...
  6. ncbi request reprint Xenon improves neurologic outcome and reduces secondary injury following trauma in an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury*
    Rita Campos-Pires
    1Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care Section, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom 2Department of Anaesthesiology, Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany 3Department of Anaesthesiology, Klinikum Hanau, Hanau, Germany 4Mouse Behavioral Outcome Unit, Focus Program Translational Neurosciences, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany 5Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Crit Care Med 43:149-58. 2015
    ..To determine the neuroprotective efficacy of the inert gas xenon following traumatic brain injury and to determine whether application of xenon has a clinically relevant therapeutic time window...
  7. ncbi request reprint Determinants of the anesthetic sensitivity of two-pore domain acid-sensitive potassium channels: molecular cloning of an anesthetic-activated potassium channel from Lymnaea stagnalis
    Isabelle Andres-Enguix
    Biophysics Section, Blackett Laboratory, and Division of Biology, Imperial College, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ
    J Biol Chem 282:20977-90. 2007
    ..The L159A mutation in LyTASK disrupts the stereoselective response to isoflurane while having no effect on the pH sensitivity of the channel, suggesting this critical amino acid may form part of an anesthetic binding site...