Andrew Clarke

Summary

Affiliation: British Antarctic Survey
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Temperature, metabolic power and the evolution of endothermy
    Andrew Clarke
    Biological Sciences, British Antarctic Survey, NERC, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ET, UK
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 85:703-27. 2010
  2. pmc Evolutionary dynamics at high latitudes: speciation and extinction in polar marine faunas
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:3655-66. 2010
  3. ncbi request reprint Protein synthesis, RNA concentrations, nitrogen excretion, and metabolism vary seasonally in the Antarctic holothurian Heterocucumis steineni (Ludwig 1898)
    Keiron P P Fraser
    British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OET, United Kingdom
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:556-69. 2004
  4. pmc Antarctic ecology from genes to ecosystems: the impact of climate change and the importance of scale
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, NERC, Cambridge, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:5-9. 2007
  5. pmc Climate change and the marine ecosystem of the western Antarctic Peninsula
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, NERC, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:149-66. 2007
  6. doi request reprint Dinosaur energetics: setting the bounds on feasible physiologies and ecologies
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK
    Am Nat 182:283-97. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Adult antarctic krill feeding at abyssal depths
    Andrew Clarke
    Biological Sciences, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge CB3 0ET, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 18:282-5. 2008
  8. pmc Climate, energy and diversity
    Andrew Clarke
    Biological Sciences, British Antarctic Survey, NERC, Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:2257-66. 2006
  9. doi request reprint Scaling of basal metabolic rate with body mass and temperature in mammals
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK
    J Anim Ecol 79:610-9. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint Growth in the slow lane: protein metabolism in the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna (Strebel 1908)
    Keiron P P Fraser
    British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 OET, UK
    J Exp Biol 210:2691-9. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. doi request reprint Temperature, metabolic power and the evolution of endothermy
    Andrew Clarke
    Biological Sciences, British Antarctic Survey, NERC, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ET, UK
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 85:703-27. 2010
    ..Large dinosaurs were warm, but were not endotherms, and the metabolic status of pterosaurs remains unresolved...
  2. pmc Evolutionary dynamics at high latitudes: speciation and extinction in polar marine faunas
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 365:3655-66. 2010
    ..Molecular techniques to produce phylogenies, coupled with further palaeontological work to root these phylogenies in time, will be essential to further progress...
  3. ncbi request reprint Protein synthesis, RNA concentrations, nitrogen excretion, and metabolism vary seasonally in the Antarctic holothurian Heterocucumis steineni (Ludwig 1898)
    Keiron P P Fraser
    British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OET, United Kingdom
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:556-69. 2004
    ..concinna, while the proportional decrease in protein synthesis rates is similar in both species...
  4. pmc Antarctic ecology from genes to ecosystems: the impact of climate change and the importance of scale
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, NERC, Cambridge, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:5-9. 2007
    ....
  5. pmc Climate change and the marine ecosystem of the western Antarctic Peninsula
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, NERC, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:149-66. 2007
    ..The complexity of the Southern Ocean food web and the nonlinear nature of many interactions mean that predictions based on short-term studies of a small number of species are likely to be misleading...
  6. doi request reprint Dinosaur energetics: setting the bounds on feasible physiologies and ecologies
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK
    Am Nat 182:283-97. 2013
    ..It would appear that dinosaurs exhibited a range of metabolic levels to match the broad spectrum of ecological niches they occupied...
  7. doi request reprint Adult antarctic krill feeding at abyssal depths
    Andrew Clarke
    Biological Sciences, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge CB3 0ET, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 18:282-5. 2008
    ..These observations revise significantly our understanding of the depth distribution and ecology of Antarctic krill, a central organism in the Southern Ocean ecosystem...
  8. pmc Climate, energy and diversity
    Andrew Clarke
    Biological Sciences, British Antarctic Survey, NERC, Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 273:2257-66. 2006
    ..If we are to make progress in elucidating these mechanisms, it is important to distinguish climatic effects on species' distribution and abundance from processes linking energy supply to plant and animal diversity...
  9. doi request reprint Scaling of basal metabolic rate with body mass and temperature in mammals
    Andrew Clarke
    British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK
    J Anim Ecol 79:610-9. 2010
    ..All other things being equal, a polar mammal living at -10 degrees C has a body temperature approximately 2.7 degrees C warmer and a BMR higher by approximately 40% than a tropical mammal of similar size living at 25 degrees C...
  10. ncbi request reprint Growth in the slow lane: protein metabolism in the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna (Strebel 1908)
    Keiron P P Fraser
    British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 OET, UK
    J Exp Biol 210:2691-9. 2007
    ..In the absence of adaptation, predicted increases in Antarctic water temperatures would result in reduced, rather than increased, rates of protein synthesis and, in turn, possibly growth...
  11. ncbi request reprint Energetic cost of synthesizing proteins in Antarctic limpet, Nacella concinna (Strebel, 1908), is not temperature dependent
    Andrew D Bowgen
    British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 292:R2266-74. 2007
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Low-temperature protein metabolism: seasonal changes in protein synthesis and RNA dynamics in the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna Strebel 1908
    Keiron P P Fraser
    Natural Environment Research Council, British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ET, UK
    J Exp Biol 205:3077-86. 2002
    ..Calculations using theoretical energetic costs of protein synthesis suggest that Antarctic species may allocate a larger proportion of their metabolic budget to protein synthesis than do temperate or tropical species...
  13. pmc Body temperature predicts maximum microsatellite length in mammals
    William Amos
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Biol Lett 4:399-401. 2008
    ..Our results support a model of microsatellite evolution in which maximum length is limited by a temperature-dependent stability threshold...
  14. ncbi request reprint Antarctic marine biology
    David K A Barnes
    British Antarctic Survey, NERC, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ET, UK
    Curr Biol 21:R451-7. 2011
    ..Being isolated and difficult of access, there are large areas which have never been sampled or even visited, and much of the biology is very poorly known away from the proximity of research stations...
  15. pmc Introduction. Antarctic ecology: from genes to ecosystems. Part 2. Evolution, diversity and functional ecology
    Alex D Rogers
    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent s Park, London, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:2187-9. 2007
    ..The simplicity of Antarctic communities, especially from terrestrial systems, makes them ideal to investigate the ecological implications of climate change, which are difficult to identify in more complex systems...
  16. ncbi request reprint Trade-offs in thermal adaptation: the need for a molecular to ecological integration
    Hans O Portner
    Animal Ecophysiology, Alfred Wegener Institute fur Polar und Meeresforschung, Okophysiologie, Postfach 120161, D 27515 Bremerhaven, Germany
    Physiol Biochem Zool 79:295-313. 2006
    ..This understanding builds on a mechanistic analysis of the width and location of thermal windows on the temperature scale and also on study of the functional properties of relevant proteins and associated gene expression mechanisms...
  17. ncbi request reprint A reappraisal of the habitability of planets around M dwarf stars
    Jill C Tarter
    SETI Institute, Mountain View, California 94043, USA
    Astrobiology 7:30-65. 2007
    ..This paper presents the summary conclusions of an interdisciplinary workshop (http://mstars.seti.org) sponsored by the NASA Astrobiology Institute and convened at the SETI Institute...
  18. ncbi request reprint Myogenic cell cycle duration in Harpagifer species with sub-Antarctic and Antarctic distributions: evidence for cold compensation
    Julie C Brodeur
    Gatty Marine Laboratory, School of Biology, Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland, KY16 8LB, UK
    J Exp Biol 206:1011-6. 2003
    ..The results obtained are compatible with an evolutionary adjustment of cell cycle time for function at low temperature in the Antarctic species...
  19. ncbi request reprint Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide as signalling molecules in plants
    Steven J Neill
    Centre for Research in Plant Science, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY, UK
    J Exp Bot 53:1237-47. 2002
    ..Key signalling components that might provide targets for enhancing crop production are also identified...