Peter J Hills

Summary

Affiliation: Anglia Ruskin University
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint A spatial frequency account of the detriment that local processing of Navon letters has on face recognition
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, England
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 35:1427-42. 2009
  2. doi request reprint Sad people are more accurate at face recognition than happy people
    Peter J Hills
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF24 0JF, UK
    Conscious Cogn 20:1502-17. 2011
  3. doi request reprint First fixations in face processing: the more diagnostic they are the smaller the face-inversion effect
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 142:211-9. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Aberrant first fixations when looking at inverted faces in various poses: the result of the centre-of-gravity effect?
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK
    Br J Psychol 103:520-38. 2012
  5. doi request reprint A developmental study of the own-age face recognition bias in children
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge CB1 1PT, England
    Dev Psychol 48:499-508. 2012
  6. doi request reprint Attention misplaced: the role of diagnostic features in the face-inversion effect
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 1PT England
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 37:1396-406. 2011
  7. doi request reprint Sad people avoid the eyes or happy people focus on the eyes? Mood induction affects facial feature discrimination
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Broad Street, Cambridge, UK
    Br J Psychol 102:260-74. 2011
  8. doi request reprint The own-age face recognition bias in children and adults
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 64:17-23. 2011
  9. doi request reprint Cross-modal face identity aftereffects and their relation to priming
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 36:876-91. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint Identity adaptation is mediated and moderated by visualisation ability
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Broad Street, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
    Perception 37:1241-57. 2008

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. doi request reprint A spatial frequency account of the detriment that local processing of Navon letters has on face recognition
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, England
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 35:1427-42. 2009
    ..These results suggest that the Navon effect on subsequent face recognition is a perceptual phenomenon...
  2. doi request reprint Sad people are more accurate at face recognition than happy people
    Peter J Hills
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF24 0JF, UK
    Conscious Cogn 20:1502-17. 2011
    ..It is suggested that happy-induced participants do not process faces as elaborately as sad-induced participants...
  3. doi request reprint First fixations in face processing: the more diagnostic they are the smaller the face-inversion effect
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
    Acta Psychol (Amst) 142:211-9. 2013
    ..The results suggest that the first facial feature attended to is more predictive of recognition accuracy than the face orientation in which they are presented...
  4. doi request reprint Aberrant first fixations when looking at inverted faces in various poses: the result of the centre-of-gravity effect?
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK
    Br J Psychol 103:520-38. 2012
    ..These results are consistent with Barton et al.'s (2006) but not Williams and Henderson's (2007) findings: possible explanations for this are discussed with the caveat that the same images were used from learning to test...
  5. doi request reprint A developmental study of the own-age face recognition bias in children
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge CB1 1PT, England
    Dev Psychol 48:499-508. 2012
    ..These results show that the face recognition system is updated on the basis of recent experience and/or motivation to process faces, creating recognition biases...
  6. doi request reprint Attention misplaced: the role of diagnostic features in the face-inversion effect
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 1PT England
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 37:1396-406. 2011
    ..The results suggest that the first facial feature attended to is important for accurate face recognition and this may carry some of the effects of inversion...
  7. doi request reprint Sad people avoid the eyes or happy people focus on the eyes? Mood induction affects facial feature discrimination
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Broad Street, Cambridge, UK
    Br J Psychol 102:260-74. 2011
    ..The results are interpreted in terms of differential use of features attended to by happy and sad participants, whereby happy people are more likely to attend to eyes during face perception than sad people...
  8. doi request reprint The own-age face recognition bias in children and adults
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 64:17-23. 2011
    ..These results are discussed in terms of short-term experience with faces creating biases, and this rapidly changes with age...
  9. doi request reprint Cross-modal face identity aftereffects and their relation to priming
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 36:876-91. 2010
    ..The strongest aftereffects were found adapting to facial caricatures. These results are discussed in terms of cross-modal adaptation occurring at various loci within the face-recognition system analogous to priming...
  10. ncbi request reprint Identity adaptation is mediated and moderated by visualisation ability
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Broad Street, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
    Perception 37:1241-57. 2008
    ..These findings suggest non-facial identity cues can lead to a facial adaptation effect and that visualisation may be the mechanism behind this...
  11. doi request reprint Stereotype priming in face recognition: interactions between semantic and visual information in face encoding
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Broad Street, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
    Cognition 108:185-200. 2008
    ..These findings indicate that semantic information that is congruent with novel stereotypical faces facilitates their encoding...
  12. doi request reprint Navon letters affect face learning and face retrieval
    Michael B Lewis
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK
    Exp Psychol 56:258-64. 2009
    ..These results provide support for the TIPS explanation of the Navon effect...
  13. ncbi request reprint Temporal limitation of Navon effect on face recognition
    Peter J Hills
    School of Psychology, Tower Building, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff, Wales, UK
    Percept Mot Skills 104:501-9. 2007
    ..In Exp. 2 analysis of undergraduates' responses (9 men, 20 women, M age =19, selected by convenience) showed the decrease in the Navon effect could be prevented by alternating the Navon task with the face recognition task...
  14. ncbi request reprint Reducing the own-race bias in face recognition by shifting attention
    Peter J Hills
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 59:996-1002. 2006
    ..It is concluded that the ORB is a consequence of a failure of attention being directed to those features of other race faces that are useful for identification...
  15. pmc FIAEs in Famous Faces are Mediated by Type of Processing
    Peter J Hills
    Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University Cambridge, UK
    Front Psychol 3:256. 2012
    ..The results are interpreted in terms of how identity adaptation interacts with low-level adaptation and highlight differences in the representation of famous and unfamiliar faces...